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View Full Version : Ya know, if you wanna steam vegtables....



Chopstick
01-13-2006, 05:16 PM
Ya need to put some water in the pan.

I've been practicing for about 45 minutes walking around the table saying what's that funny smell. I had a bowl of pinto beans blow the crap out of my microwave just the other day.

It seems that here lately I cannot operate a kitchen utensil without something blowing up or catchin on fire.

Still I ain't as bad as some fellas. A few years ago one of the women at work had to rush home in the middle of the day. It was a cold day and her husband had some spray cans of paint out in the garage. Well, he wanted to paint something and the cans were too cold. He put them in the oven to warm them up and forgot about them. I'll bet there was some interesting color schemes in that kitchen once they got the fire put out.

/ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Gayle in MD
01-14-2006, 06:49 AM
Here are a few suggestions on microwave steaming. For the pintos, put some plastic wrap over the bowl, but leave a small area open. You can also put a paper plate over the bowl to keep your micro clean.

I hardly use anything but the microwave for veggies. Corn on the cob, for example, is delicious in the microwave. Just put it in a zip lock bag, but don't shuck it, and don't zip it all the way, put a little bit of water in the bag, and steam it. It is absolutely delicious that way. You have to put some oven mits on to shuck it after you take it out, but the silks and everything come off easier than if you shuck it in advance of cooking it, and the flavor is even beter than if shucked in advance. Skinny ears are the best.

Did you know that frozen veggies are healthier and more flavorful than fresh ones, because they are fast frozen at just the right point of ripening.

But, when you cook southern style fresh green beans and new potatoes and ham, they are best cooked in a pot, slowly, with vadalia onions, MMMMMMMMMMMMM....

Frozen broccoli, for example, has so much ice on it, you can just put it in a bowl with no water, usually, season it the way you like, cover tightly with plastic warp, steam it on high. Peas and beans will blow up if the plastic wrap is air tight.



/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

DickLeonard
01-16-2006, 08:29 AM
Gayle now I think I am listening to Martha. Thanks for the cooking tips.####

SpiderMan
01-16-2006, 09:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Gayle in MD:</font><hr>
I hardly use anything but the microwave for veggies. Corn on the cob, for example, is delicious in the microwave. Just put it in a zip lock bag, but don't shuck it, and don't zip it all the way, put a little bit of water in the bag, and steam it. It is absolutely delicious that way. <hr /></blockquote>

I've been doing corn in the microwave for years. You don't need any plastic wrap or baggies at all, just leave the shucks on and it will come out perfect. About one minute for an ear (I don't like mine overcooked). I just take them straight from the market to the microwave, then peel-n-eat.

For potatos, you do want to wrap them. Use a light coat of oil, butter, or bacon grease (if you're a southerner you have a jar of that saved in the 'fridge) and wrap in plastic wrap. After cooking, the skins will be tender and tasty, you'll eat the whole thing, so be sure to wash well before cooking.

SpiderMan

Chopstick
01-16-2006, 02:58 PM
I didn't know you could do corn in a microwave that way. I have a button for doing frozen vegatables that works pretty good. I've been tossin the corn the the steamer top with the string beans.

I wish I could find some kind of frozen string beans. The frozen ones they have down here are terrible. Peas aren't too good either. Frozen corn works out great. We don't get real good quality fresh corn in Flarda. Most of the time the frozen stuff is better.

We only get a decent batch of string beans down here about every three months. I buy a bag when they are here but they won't keep good so I have to eat em every day till they're gone. I tried putting them in that vaccuam thing and freezing them but it didn't work out.

I wind up throwing out a lot of vegatables. Since I live alone and they don't sell bags small enough for me to eat it all before it spoils. I wish I knew more about preserving vegatables the correct way.

SpiderMan
01-17-2006, 07:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> I wind up throwing out a lot of vegatables. Since I live alone and they don't sell bags small enough for me to eat it all before it spoils. I wish I knew more about preserving vegatables the correct way. <hr /></blockquote>

Hey Charlie - I've known you most of my life, and I know you're a convenience type. Rather than learning to preserve vegetables, you should spend your time locating the best fresh-food markets.

I do gardening and home canning, but I'm into self-sufficiency and minimal waste, and also I just enjoy gardening and canning. Your $30 ice chests are throwaways rather than something you rinse out after a trip. We just think differently! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan

Chopstick
01-17-2006, 10:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> I wind up throwing out a lot of vegatables. Since I live alone and they don't sell bags small enough for me to eat it all before it spoils. I wish I knew more about preserving vegatables the correct way. <hr /></blockquote>

Hey Charlie - I've known you most of my life, and I know you're a convenience type. Rather than learning to preserve vegetables, you should spend your time locating the best fresh-food markets.

I do gardening and home canning, but I'm into self-sufficiency and minimal waste, and also I just enjoy gardening and canning. Your $30 ice chests are throwaways rather than something you rinse out after a trip. We just think differently! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

So, what is a convenience type. There are no reliable sources of fresh produce in this area. I would have a garden if I lived somewhere else. I threw away one nasty cheap ice chest because I already had a replacement rather than waste time time trying to clean it. At least when you pull a bottle of water out of my chest it won't taste like a dead ladyfish.

I was at the grocery store the other day and the clerk asked me if I had one of their stupid discount cards. I asked if it would save me time. He said no, it would save you money. I said I have money, what I need is time. To me time is more valuable than a little bit of money. It has to be a lot of money before I would trade time for it.

SpiderMan
01-17-2006, 11:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> I wind up throwing out a lot of vegatables. Since I live alone and they don't sell bags small enough for me to eat it all before it spoils. I wish I knew more about preserving vegatables the correct way. <hr /></blockquote>

Hey Charlie - I've known you most of my life, and I know you're a convenience type. Rather than learning to preserve vegetables, you should spend your time locating the best fresh-food markets.

I do gardening and home canning, but I'm into self-sufficiency and minimal waste, and also I just enjoy gardening and canning. Your $30 ice chests are throwaways rather than something you rinse out after a trip. We just think differently! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>
I threw away one nasty cheap ice chest because I already had a replacement rather than waste time time trying to clean it. At least when you pull a bottle of water out of my chest it won't taste like a dead ladyfish.<hr /></blockquote>

Man, I didn't need a reminder for that one! "Captain Bob" would do well to get a second ice chest, so he doesn't have to keep refreshments and cut bait in the same box!

SpiderMan

SPetty
01-17-2006, 12:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> I wish I could find some kind of frozen string beans.

I buy a bag when they are here but they won't keep good so I have to eat em every day till they're gone. I tried putting them in that vaccuam thing and freezing them but it didn't work out.<hr /></blockquote>Here's some freezing information from an extension site:

When selecting beans for freezing, choose young tender beans that are at their peak of flavor and texture. They should snap when broken. If possible, harvest vegetables in the cool part of the morning and process as quickly as possible. If the freezing process is delayed, immerse vegetables in very cold water or refrigerate in shallow pans to preserve quality and nutrients.

To freeze beans, follow these steps.

First, wash; snip off tips, and sort for size. Cut or break into suitable pieces. Small beans can be frozen whole.

Next, blanch beans. There are two blanching methods.

Boiling water method - use one gallon of water per pound of vegetables. Bring water to a rolling boil and add vegetables. Cover and boil 3 minutes from the time you add vegetables to the water.

Steam blanching - put 1" of water into a kettle. Add a layer of vegetables. Cover and steam for about 4 to 4 &amp;frac; minutes.

Cool quickly in ice water.

Drain completely. Extra water forms too many ice crystals.

There are also two methods for packing beans - dry or tray pack.

With the dry pack method, beans are packed tightly into containers or freezer bags in order to exclude air. If freezer bags are used, be sure to press air out of the unfilled part of the bag before sealing.

The tray pack method involves putting a single layer of beans on a shallow pan and putting the pan into the freezer. When the beans are frozen, put them into a freezer bag or container. Be sure to put beans into a sealable container as soon as they are frozen.

Beans will maintain high quality for 12 to 18 months at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Longer storage decreases overall quality. It is best to use and enjoy the beans before the next harvest.

Chopstick
01-17-2006, 02:04 PM
I hope I get another chance to hook you up with one of these fish down here. I did my best last time. Those guys who went on down to the keys had a terrible time. The weather and water was exactly like I said it was going to be. The got the crap beat out of them on the rough water. I just took the money I would have spent on hotels and gas and hired guides. It was just plain bad luck that we didn't do any better.

Chopstick
01-17-2006, 02:05 PM
That's great. I have a vacuum bagger. I'm gonna go get some beans and try this.

Chopstick
01-17-2006, 02:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Gayle in MD:</font><hr> Here are a few suggestions on microwave steaming. For the pintos, put some plastic wrap over the bowl, but leave a small area open. You can also put a paper plate over the bowl to keep your micro clean.

<hr /></blockquote>

I put a folded up paper towel on top of the bowl. I never have seen one blow up that way. It blew the towel off and left a crater in the bowl like some pinto bean grenade had went off in there. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Gayle in MD
01-17-2006, 11:49 PM
Wow, maybe you should be glad you didn't eat those beans, LOL...maybe your micro is one that works better on the medium level. Were you cooking the beans on the high level? For peas and beans, you probably shouldn't use the high level.

Don't they sell Birds Eye frozen vegetables in Florida? Usually even the store brand frozen veggies are delicious.


Gayle in Md.