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supergreenman
01-23-2006, 02:55 PM
I'm looking for ways to light a fire under some of the guys on my wednesday team. We did quite well last year, played well as a team and had a lot of fun. Like any team we had our issues(showing up late being the most serious) but nothing really to cause serious problems.

Because of our standings last year we were bumped up to a higher division this year. This is where the problem is. This has really caused a rift in our team. It seems we have 2 lines of thought, the first being we were put in the higher division because of our abilities so step up to the plate and play. The second being the team isn't good enough for this division, isn't fair, we were bumped to fill a spot or because we beat the league organizers team in a tournament last year and all that crap. I totally disagree with line of thinking. I play on another team, and am a regular at tournaments around the city, and I'm not afraid to play anybody, I don't always win, but I love the challenge.

I know thier attitude is effecting thier play, and more than likely the the play of the rest of the team. How would you deal it? For the rest of this season anyways. I've already decided to put together a new team next year.

James

dg-in-centralpa
01-23-2006, 04:25 PM
Good luck /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif I have the same problem on my Tuesday team. We generally suck, but I have 6 out of 9 guys that have tables at home and only one other than myself will play during the week to practice. Not to sound negative, but I think you're fighting a losing battle.

DG - I have this problem year after year

supergreenman
01-23-2006, 05:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dg-in-centralpa:</font><hr> Good luck /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif I have the same problem on my Tuesday team. We generally suck, but I have 6 out of 9 guys that have tables at home and only one other than myself will play during the week to practice. Not to sound negative, but I think you're fighting a losing battle.

DG - I have this problem year after year <hr /></blockquote>

Want to join my team? /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

J

Brian in VA
01-23-2006, 05:44 PM
supergreenman,

I believe that you can't motivate anyone more than short term and that typically requires fear as the motivator. (Fear of losing one's job for example is a short term motivator to perform a task that doesn't align with one's valures for example.) True motivation, the long term variety that sticks, comes from within each person not from an outside source.

That said, you can't motivate your team mates. You can only hope to provide them with an opportunity to motivate themselves. My suggestion would be to ask everyone to come together in a team meeting, share your feelings about things and ask them what motivates them to play at all. Then look for ways to point out how playing the cards you've been dealt, bumped up to a new division etc, can be viewed in each person's motivational method. (Example, it sounds like you are motivated by the competition. This one is easy for you. Others may be motivated by a terrific performance but can't get there because the comp is too tough. Point out how learning more about their game and increasing their focus may help bring that great performance back.)

You may find that some can't explain what motivates them. Could be it's just a night out with the guys and the camaraderie that motivates them to participate. In that case, you may have to point out that for you to be fulfilled, you need the competitive spirit from everyone on your team and if they aren't going to hold up their end, you'll be looking for it elsewhere and that might get them moving in the right direction.

I don't claim to have all the answers here. I only know what I've learned leading sales and training teams in business and those are different breeds of cat. It may boil down to how hard you're willing to work and be the leader of this team. Good luck!

Brian in VA

Sid_Vicious
01-23-2006, 06:40 PM
Basically I feel you have little choice but to accept it. I will say one thing that might be of some help, get your guys to compete within the team they are on. Do this if you're the captain,,,somebody has to keep the scoresheet right? Make the low guy show up next match to do that chore. One time with that do-able, yet hassle, and you might see the individuals work at not being low, hence some effort you aren't seeing now. Worked for me. Jm2c...sid

dg-in-centralpa
01-23-2006, 07:05 PM
Brian, I agree with your points. All my guys are out to have fun and it's a night out away from the job, wife, and kids. They get pi$$ed if they miss easy shots, but none are willing to play between matches. Go figure. I've had offers to join other teams, but this one has been together for almost 10 years. I also play on a Thursday which is my more serious team.

DG

dg-in-centralpa
01-23-2006, 07:06 PM
Sure, just have plenty of Molson on hand.

DG - LOL

The_Doctor
01-24-2006, 04:31 AM
I've got an image of half of your team having a "oh its just not worth it" attitude. I read sports science &amp; physiology for my first degree back in the day, an the topic of motivating sports performers was always a tricky one. As has already been posted each person is motivated differently. The basics of motivating a performer as I remember was about goal setting. Short term goals to provide a constant feeling of satisfaction and them medium to long term goals to provide a direction. But if you let the performer know that this was to motivate them the whole process would fall apart.
What you could do is subtly set each player who feels its not worth it a goal. That goal needn't be to win the rack it could be as abstract as challenging one of your players to stay down on all of his shots (you could tell him you'll buy him a beer if he stays down on every shot). This takes their mind from the percieved goal of winning the rack (which they feel is too hard) and gives them a goal which is achievable, they achieve their short term goal and therefore feel happier with their performance, win or loose.
The problem is that without a fair bit of experience with attempting to motivate people its very difficult to know how a person is going to respond.
If its motivating people to practice then this is could be done by tapping into social needs. You could arrange a practice evening for the team which was mainly social but be wary trying to teach people who don't want to learn. I can't imagine that you will ever get people to practice properly who can't really be bothered.
So If you can get them to enjoy playing, then get them to achieve by changing the parameters of what is a success then you may be able to get your team on track. But it will probably be a struggle.
Andy.

pooltchr
01-24-2006, 06:02 AM
The real question seems to be why do your teammates play. If someone plays for the social reason, ie, a night out with friends and a couple of drinks, they probably aren't going to take the whole experience as seriously as you might. I have guys on my team who are more interested in the ball game on tv when their opponent is at the table than they are the match. Others are totally involved in the match. With league play, you have players of all different skill levels and different reasons for being there. To put together a team of highly motivated players is tough.
League night for me is more about the competition, but I know that everyone on my team isn't going to be like me, so the whole league experience becomes more of a social event. Yes, we want to win, but we also have fun. If I want real competition, I go for tournament play.
You just have to accept league play for what it is...fun!
Steve

Cane
01-24-2006, 07:07 AM
SGM, pooltchr is probably right. If the ones that are the "problem" just do league as a social thing, then you'll probably never motivate them to do any better... they're just having fun! To most, League Night is a night to drink a few beers and hit a few balls, and nothing more. To some, it's fierce competition. Hard to take someone who wants to drink beer and have fun and get them into a "destroy" mode, ya know.

Later,
Bob

supergreenman
01-24-2006, 09:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dg-in-centralpa:</font><hr> Sure, just have plenty of Molson on hand.

DG - LOL <hr /></blockquote>

I just happen to come from the Molson land of plenty /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

James

supergreenman
01-24-2006, 09:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cane:</font><hr> SGM, pooltchr is probably right. If the ones that are the "problem" just do league as a social thing, then you'll probably never motivate them to do any better... they're just having fun! To most, League Night is a night to drink a few beers and hit a few balls, and nothing more. To some, it's fierce competition. Hard to take someone who wants to drink beer and have fun and get them into a "destroy" mode, ya know.

Later,
Bob <hr /></blockquote>

Steve and Bob, you're totally hit the nail on the head. They joined the team last year for a night out, to have a good time.
This year they aren't having such a good time. I was hoping that if they played to thier abilities and started winning some they'd start having a better time, but as brian said, I guess the motivation part is mostly up to them.

James