PDA

View Full Version : Bob Jewett: 14.1 use of equipment question



Paul_Mon
01-23-2006, 07:05 PM
Bob,
In a game of 14.1 where the table is NOT marked with the outline of the rack and a referee is not being used. Can a player use the rack to determine if a potential break ball will interfere with the rack? Players routinely do this at the local pool hall and I tend to agree with allowing it.

Thanks..........Paul Mon

Bob_Jewett
01-24-2006, 11:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Paul_Mon:</font><hr> ...
In a game of 14.1 where the table is NOT marked with the outline of the rack and a referee is not being used. Can a player use the rack to determine if a potential break ball will interfere with the rack? Players routinely do this at the local pool hall and I tend to agree with allowing it. <hr /></blockquote>
The rules require the rack to be marked. If the rack is not marked, you are already not playing by the rules. You may as well do the best you can under the circumstances, which I think includes using the triangle to estimate when a ball is in the rack.

The real solution is to mark the table.

Deeman3
01-24-2006, 02:28 PM
Paul,

We have this same problem in that everyone does not want you marking up their table. We do as you do and use the rack. I think the pool gods will forgive us even if the purists don't! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Deeman

nAz
01-25-2006, 06:55 PM
lol I don't allow it,,, i like to tell my opponent that they been playing long enough to know if the OB is in the rack or not /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
I also play all ball fauls makes the game tougher when your jacked up over another ball.

I was planning on pencil drawing the outline of the rack at my local PH, now someone told me that you need to draw the out line from the outside of the rack but i believe he is wrong and it should be from the inside. can anyone confirm that?

walt8880
01-25-2006, 09:32 PM
From a purist point of view, would seem that you should mark the inside of the rack.

Practically though, unless you intend to rack the balls by hand and not use a mechanical racking device, would seem that you should mark the outside.

Where I play, they are marked by the outside of the rack, but I am not sure if that is "correct" or not.

Steve Lipsky
01-26-2006, 08:31 AM
I've experimented with drawing both lines on the same table. It actually worked out very well. You could plainly see not just where the edge of the balls would be (the inside line), but where the rack would be placed as well (the outside line).

It wasn't distracting at all, gave a lot of information, and the design itself actually looked pretty cool.

- Steve

Rich R.
01-26-2006, 09:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> I've experimented with drawing both lines on the same table. It actually worked out very well. You could plainly see not just where the edge of the balls would be (the inside line), but where the rack would be placed as well (the outside line).

It wasn't distracting at all, gave a lot of information, and the design itself actually looked pretty cool.

- Steve <hr /></blockquote>
Steve, I'm curious.
In NYC, where a lot of players still play straight pool, do the rooms put the rack outline on the tables?

In my area, 98% of the players don't even know what straight pool is and the tables, obviously, are not marked.
Some rooms don't even have counters that are appropriate for straight pool.

slow_roller
01-26-2006, 10:55 AM
My friend and I seem to be the only ones who play 14.1 at the place we play, and we use white chockboard chalk to lightly mark the outline (outside of the rack). It mostly brushes off when we're done.

Steve Lipsky
01-26-2006, 11:19 AM
Hey Rich. I honestly can't even remember what a pool table looks like WITHOUT the markings! I would imagine it'd be very distracting to me to not see them /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif.

And pretty much every "house" table in New York has overhead beads for counting/viewing.

Rich, you might have better weather and even a better standard of living... but if you don't have racklines and beads, what the hell are you doing out there?

/ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

- Steve

Rich R.
01-26-2006, 11:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> Hey Rich. I honestly can't even remember what a pool table looks like WITHOUT the markings! I would imagine it'd be very distracting to me to not see them /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif.

And pretty much every "house" table in New York has overhead beads for counting/viewing.

Rich, you might have better weather and even a better standard of living... but if you don't have racklines and beads, what the hell are you doing out there?

/ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

- Steve <hr /></blockquote>
Steve, I wouldn't bank on the "better weather" or the "standard of living" here, but there are certainly a lot of benefits to living in the Big City.

Thanks for the response.

Paul_Mon
01-26-2006, 04:09 PM
Thanks Bob. BTW, what are your thoughts on the Diamond racks. I really like the "sight" notch on the back of the rack. It makes racking 14 balls much more precise. I liked it so much that I've modified my own rack to do the same, on all three sides.

Paul Mon

Bob_Jewett
01-26-2006, 04:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Paul_Mon:</font><hr>... BTW, what are your thoughts on the Diamond racks. I really like the "sight" notch on the back of the rack. It makes racking 14 balls much more precise. I liked it so much that I've modified my own rack to do the same, on all three sides. ... <hr /></blockquote>
I didn't notice that -- I assume it is opposite the "this corner forward" mark.

What a lot of players didn't like was that the tip of the triangle sticks out much farther than on the typical rack, and the rack is fairly thick. This makes little difference at nine ball, but at 14.1 it puts a lot of break shots out of play.

Paul_Mon
01-26-2006, 05:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr> I didn't notice that -- I assume it is opposite the "this corner forward" mark.

What a lot of players didn't like was that the tip of the triangle sticks out much farther than on the typical rack, and the rack is fairly thick. This makes little difference at nine ball, but at 14.1 it puts a lot of break shots out of play. <hr /></blockquote>

Your assumption is correct. There is a notch in the center of the back side of the rack that could be aligned with a pencil mark on the cloth. Greg mentioned that it is all but impossible to see where the head ball is sitting on the spot. Never thought about the 14.1 racking differences. I wondered why it wasn't designed to be used in all three orientations. Manufacturing would have been easier and cheaper. The "Diamond" in the tip is a classy way to advertise and distinguish the product.