PDA

View Full Version : "Make it interesting, let's play for something"



Tom_In_Cincy
06-30-2002, 11:06 AM
I am sure that most of us have had this question or have used this as a prelude to playing someone.

When you are in the mood to play, and a friend or a player that you know, wants to play.. you or the player says.

Want to make it interesting? or, "I don't want to play-play, I need to play for something.."

Does playing for as little as 'talbe time' force you to concentrate more?
Do you play differently when there isn't something 'to make it interesting' on the match?

I know that I will play differently if the game or match is during a tournament or league play. Otherwise, when I play it is usually a practice game. I will try to execute different shots, strategies, banks (instead of safes), tough cuts (instead of banking or sateies). And, I find myself testing a more aggressive approach, when practicing during a match that is not league or tournament related.

But, I have seen players that like to keep their competitive edge (league and tournament matches) sharp by playing 'for something' to keep 'it interesting'.

My question is this, do you think that it is that easy to convince yourself that because a few dollars are on the match, that it puts you into the 'competitive mode'? And if so, does it really work?

SPetty
06-30-2002, 11:47 AM
Hi Tom,

I don't have a lot of experience playing for money, but it would have to be a bit more than a few bucks or table time to get my attention. However, if it didn't get my attention but was enough to get my opponent's attention and get their game up a notch, then I would see that I needed to take my game up a notch as well.

Q-guy
07-01-2002, 10:26 AM
It always seem, at least for me. If I play 100% for nothing my opponent will not. I usually hear something like, "why don't you just shoot the ball, we aren't playing for anything." Or they will start screwing around if they are getting beat as a defense mechanism for their ego. They won't try on purpose. I may also be accused of beating up on somebody. Either way, even just playing for time may at least guarantee me a decent match. I would rather play by myself, then practice with someone that won't try 100% to win.

phil in sofla
07-01-2002, 06:11 PM
I'd say I concentrate more when I'm playing TO something, just as much as if it is FOR something.

That is, playing games to be playing games, not keeping track, tends to leave my concentration a little loose. However, if I'm running a set to some total number of games that 'win' the set, or even just moving a quarter around the table, per game, either will concentrate my mind a considerable amount, even if the score isn't about a wager.

Ryan
07-01-2002, 09:29 PM
I'll be the first to say that I really don't care about the game unless there is something of value on the line. I don't care whether it's something as simple as a beer, I'll make a point to put in the extra effort.

If it's just a game, I really don't care. I don't take as long when lining up my shots, and I certainly don't waste my time playing safe. I'll take the most outrageous shots that I can find just because it's nothing more than practice. Afterall, what's the worst thing that can happen?

Rod
07-02-2002, 03:12 AM
I'm about the same here Phil. It needs to be an established goal to reach, whether it's for money or just to see who wins. To bang balls around is not productive to me.

cheesemouse
07-02-2002, 05:58 AM
Ryan,
I'm with you here. <blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr>If it's just a game, I really don't care. I don't take as long when lining up my shots, and I certainly don't waste my time playing safe. I'll take the most outrageous shots that I can find just because it's nothing more than practice. Afterall, what's the worst thing that can happen?<hr></blockquote>
...and while I don't mind just banging them around on occasion. After all it's a good time to shot those hair brained shots just to see what the % really are but that carrot on the end of the stick is where it's at for me. I'm so bad that I even offer the guys I instruct a chance to get the lesson for free... LOL /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

griffith_d
07-02-2002, 06:33 AM
Playing for something does nothing for me. I used to hustle, when I was not "blind", but that was 25 years ago.

I have always played to win at all times. I do let up, no matter what.

When people ask to play for money, I just say, "I will beat you for free".

Playing for money seemed to ruin pool for me. I would look for a sucker and take their money and after a couple of years I did not feel good about myself. I would not play anyone without the money. Then when people would know me in the place I played at, they would not play me for money.

Finally pool was not fun anymore, I picked on anyone who was a easy target. A couple of people would not pay, I said, "pay up or leave",...they left, as I am not a small person.

So you see, I got fed up playing for money and the all of the hustle.

Now, I just play in tournaments, where it makes me feel good to win. As of lately, I have taken 3rd (should have been 2nd) two weeks straight at Slick Willies in Houston. Tonight, I play again armed with my new Predator BK.

Wish me luck.

Griff

SpiderMan
07-02-2002, 08:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr>
My question is this, do you think that it is that easy to convince yourself that because a few dollars are on the match, that it puts you into the 'competitive mode'? And if so, does it really work?
<hr></blockquote>

Tom,

I've been playing for 15 or 20 years, and have never "gotten into" gambling. I'm not sure exactly why, but here's my best cut at an analysis:

Early on, hanging out at the Golden Cue and River City billiards in Memphis on weekends when I was home from college, I had plenty of opportunity to watch "real" players gambling. I was about 20 and had just started playing pool. I also had very little money, so it didn't even seem logical that I would fit into that scene.

Eventually I moved to Dallas, had become a somewhat better player with plenty of discretionary money, and of course got into a few money games with both strangers and familiars. Maybe I gambled with the wrong people, but I found that having money on the line often makes an otherwise well-mannered opponent prone to trash-talking, stick-waving, coin-jingling, and all other manner of sharking moves, rather than a higher level of concentration. Basically it seemed to turn ordinary men into assholes.

Then I discovered "weekly tournaments" and "leagues". These seem to me like an ideal avenue for putting something on the line while minimizing the personality problems that come with an opponent who cannot afford to lose. Once in the tournament, you can only increase your $ by winning rounds. You have already "posted up" everything that you stand to lose. A fine point, but nonetheless it seems to hold true. Tournament players generally have a higher-class demeanor than pick-up gamblers. I currently play in two tournaments and two leagues every week.

Several friends and I do play for drinks when we're playing sets together. I feel fine about this, because all of them have plenty of money and can afford to buy rounds all day. They don't want to be seen buying the drinks because of the ego thing, but the money won't hurt them at all. I also have some friends with less money, and I never offer to gamble with them because I would gain little and they would lose much (relatively).

I never have a problem with concentration due to no monetary risk. I hate to be seen racking. If I have a concentration problem it's more likely due to a late evening the night before.

I will gamble with someone that I know can afford to lose, or at least will be pragmatic about their losses. I will occasionally gamble with someone who walks up and challenges while I'm practicing, just to see if I can stun them, but that doesn't seem to happen very often. I play mostly at one place, and everyone in there knows the pecking order. I mostly get offers from gamblers who know they can beat me, and I'm not interested in trying to negotiate a spot with someone who will play only if it's a pretty sure income for them.

So basically I guess I gamble only with complete strangers (rarely) and with certain people that I know don't depend on it for a living. I don't think I have any problems with concentration, regardless of the stakes. As I may have noted, racking builds character but I'm already one of those so I don't need to be doing it.

SpiderMan

TonyM
07-02-2002, 11:30 PM
It works for me. Even if it is just for $10 a set, I definitely notice the increase in concentration and pressure. I think it helps me play better.

Tony
-doesn't play as well when it's just for fun.....