PDA

View Full Version : Junk Mail/Zero% CC Offers Concerns?



Sid_Vicious
02-04-2006, 10:52 AM
I have these thing pile up and started shredding them but there's so darn many so I wondered, "Is it really worth worrying about?" The trash pickup in the residential area I live in is seemingly safe enough, so could there be any real chance someone would dive into the dump and search the sea of black garbage bags? It's just such a hassle to manage these things. The easy answer is to say "Better safe than sorry", but think about this...culprits wanting these offers would be smarter to simply raid mailboxes on any given day. I'd burn them but there's a burn ban on.

Anyone simply toss them into the garbage without much thought?

Thanks...sid

wolfdancer
02-04-2006, 11:02 AM
Sid, I use a shredder....the other day, at the bottom of one of them "pre-approved" offers, there was a link to a site where you can opt out. I've mislaid that, but it sounds like a way to cut down on the junk mail.
I bought something from Amazon recently, and also got an Amazon CC (Chase bank)for the $30 off, first purchase deal.
It's a new card, and only been used that one time....but I got a bogus email, about updating my info on the card....scary...
Keep on shredding!!!!!

Deeman3
02-04-2006, 12:00 PM
I use a cheap home depot shredder. However, I just stick the envolopes in and let them rip. Unfortunately, it gets hobbled on the little pre-approved cards inside.

I can't beleive that many people respond to these mailings but I guess they do of they would stop sending them.


Deeman

SnakebyteXX
02-04-2006, 04:56 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr>
Anyone simply toss them into the garbage without much thought?

Thanks...sid <hr /></blockquote>

We used to toss them out with the trash but not any more.

First I bought a cheap little shredder that choked if you put more than one piece of paper at a time into it. Then I managed to score a used industrial strength shredder from our local Sallies for about forty bucks. This bad ass mo fo can eat telephone books (not really but it CAN take several envelopes at a time - including ones with those BS phony credit cards inside). I love it.

When it's winter time I feed most of that kind of stuff into our wood stove.

Either way - I never let it out of the house once we have it in our possession.

Snake

DickLeonard
02-06-2006, 06:33 AM
Wolfdancer the answer is to just return the the stamped envelope with your return address and nothing in it. I tried to stop the credit card offers from coming. Sometimes 10 a week they referred me to a service and the first thing they wanted was my SS number. I thought, they have you, how to escape the trap so let them pay twice to mail you.####

DickLeonard
02-06-2006, 06:33 AM
Wolfdancer the answer is to just return the the stamped envelope with your return address and nothing in it. I tried to stop the credit card offers from coming. Sometimes 10 a week they referred me to a service and the first thing they wanted was my SS number. I thought, they have you, how to escape the trap so let them pay twice to mail you.####

DickLeonard
02-06-2006, 06:33 AM
Wolfdancer the answer is to just return the the stamped envelope with your return address and nothing in it. I tried to stop the credit card offers from coming. Sometimes 10 a week they referred me to a service and the first thing they wanted was my SS number. I thought, they have you, how to escape the trap so let them pay twice to mail you.####

SpiderMan
02-06-2006, 08:25 AM
If you can be defrauded using something like an unsolicited credit card if it "gets out of the house", doesn't that mean that everyone could suffer the same loss "before" it enters the house? After all, thousands of these cards are in mail circulation at any given time, and the eventual recipients aren't even aware of them yet.

SpiderMan

eg8r
02-06-2006, 10:17 AM
While you are correct, why not still do something remove the opportunity after it leaves your house (just because it did not get stolen in the mail does not mean it cannot be stolen out of the trash). Quite possibly the guy dumpster diving might not ever look in your mailbox and just wait for you to throw it away. I try to do my part and remove as much temptation as possible. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r

SnakebyteXX
02-06-2006, 01:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> While you are correct, why not still do something remove the opportunity after it leaves your house (just because it did not get stolen in the mail does not mean it cannot be stolen out of the trash). Quite possibly the guy dumpster diving might not ever look in your mailbox and just wait for you to throw it away. I try to do my part and remove as much temptation as possible. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>

What you really want to protect against is someone gaining access to your SSI#, and or your drivers license. Armed with those two pieces of info a pro can start opening credit accounts and charging things in your name all over the country -

Most of the time you won't know that your identity has been stolen until weird charges begin to appear on your credit card or bills begin to arrive for credit accounts that you did not open. Sometimes you won't learn about the theft until after the accounts have been used and left unpaid. Often ID crooks will use different billing addresses than your own in order to divert the bills to a neutral location. You won't know this has been going on until the bills go into default and the companies that have issued the credit in your name come looking for you - often this results in notification by checking your annual credit report and discovering that you have a number of unexplained black marks.

Interestingly enough the three main credit reporting bureaus have a built in fraud alert safeguard that could prevent this from happening. The problem is that you have to request it - it's not automatic (I assume that this is the case because it would cost them too much $ to provide the protection to everyone regardless of expected fraud):

If you think your identity has been stolen, here's what to do:

1. Contact the fraud departments of any one of the three consumer reporting companies to place a fraud alert on your credit report. The fraud alert tells creditors to contact you before opening any new accounts or making any changes to your existing accounts. You only need to contact one of the three companies to place an alert. The company you call is required to contact the other two, which will place an alert on their versions of your report, too. Once you place the fraud alert in your file, you're entitled to order free copies of your credit reports, and, if you ask, only the last four digits of your Social Security number will appear on your credit reports.


web page (http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft/)

Keep in mind that you don't have to prove fraud to request this protection. You simply have to ask for it on the basis that you 'suspect' fraud (claim that your wife or husband's purse/wallet containing driver's license etc. has gone missing but you aren't sure if it's just lost of if it's actually been stolen) and they will initiate the protection - ususally the service will last for up to six months.

There are MANY ways that the ID theft jerks have of mining for information. Credit card apps that come in the mail are only one small area of vulnerability. Personally, I destroy ANYTHING that comes in the mail that might provide a bad guy with my ID info if carelessly discarded. This includes any accounting data (old bills etc.) that has passed the seven year time limit required by the IRS for tax documentation. All junk mail - period. Anything that might contain my SSI# anything from the DMV (other than Pink Slip etc.).

While we're on the subject - it's probably NOT a good idea to throw away old hard drives or to pass on a used computer without first removing the old drives. We had a recent incident in town involving a break-in at our chiropracter's office. The thieves only took one thing - the hard drive from the main office computer. That hard drive contained the SSI#'s of all the clients dumb enough to have provided it when requested along with their names and addresses. We were not included because I will not give out my SSI# unless I am absolutely certain that it is required and that the informatin will be fully protected.

Finally, for those of you who live on rural routes: We live on a rural mail route. We put up a locking mailbox a couple of years ago to make certain that ripping off our mailbox after the mail had been delivered would be a whole lot harder. So far - no mail theft.

Snake

Fran Crimi
02-06-2006, 02:10 PM
I agree. I think it's overkill to worry about shredding junk mail. They're simply solicitations designed to look important. They have no meaning and no importance. The only thing on them is your name and address, which most people can get by looking at your doorbell or mailbox.

Toss 'em.

That whole pre-approved nonsense is baloney. I get stuff in the mail all the time 'pre-approving' relations of mine who have been dead for 10 or more years. It's all bogus just to get your attention.

Fran

SpiderMan
02-06-2006, 02:47 PM
I guess I must just be an agitator. When I receive unsolicited credit cards in the mail (and I seem to get a couple a week), my first thought is to save them all up and then leave them laying on the counter at the local poolroom. It would serve the junk mailers right to have to eat the fraudulent charges. They don't have my signature on anything, and no financial information, and can't even prove I ever received their spam.

Up to now, I've just done like Fran, tossed them unopened into the trash. But I'm thinking about changing that .....

SpiderMan

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> While you are correct, why not still do something remove the opportunity after it leaves your house (just because it did not get stolen in the mail does not mean it cannot be stolen out of the trash). Quite possibly the guy dumpster diving might not ever look in your mailbox and just wait for you to throw it away. I try to do my part and remove as much temptation as possible. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>

Snapshot9
02-06-2006, 07:11 PM
When I get my mail there is a dumpster next to the apartment mailboxes, and I trash all ads and spam, credit card stuff, etc.. I still get mail addressed to my ex-wife, Linda, and we have been divorced 18 years.