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kevinkins
03-12-2006, 09:36 AM
I am an average player and want to upgrade my cue from the ones that came with the table last year. I tried a Cutec cue at a store and I'm interested in the fiberglass feel. The guy at the store says he sells way more wood cues. So what are the benefits of the fiberglass vs wood. Also, what weight should I buy? The guy said lighter is better. Should I go with the tip on the cue or go for a custom tip. I dont think my game warrents any thing over $100.

Thanks.

- Kevin

Sid_Vicious
03-12-2006, 09:52 AM
I feel your last statement answers you questions. Go ahead and buy around your thoughts of the games worth of a hundred, get the Cuetec. My attitude of a price is quite different, hence the moot answers(IMO) sid

ryushen21
03-12-2006, 11:27 AM
A lot of people aren't a big fan of cuetecs because the fiberglass eventually starts to feel really sticky. I would suggest that you invest a little bit more and get a mcdermott or a lucasi. both of those have wood shafts and run in the 120-150 price range.

PoolSharkAllen
03-12-2006, 03:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote kevinkins:</font><hr> I dont think my game warrents any thing over $100.
<hr /></blockquote>

Kevin, If you play a lot, you may want to spend more than $100 to get a better quality cue. As your game advances, you'll appreciate a better quality cue more. Take good care of the cue and it could last you many, many years for a relatively small investment.

PastPrime
03-12-2006, 05:01 PM
If you like the feel of the Cue Tek then go ahead and buy it. It will last a long time and if you WEAR A GLOVE it will always remain like new. I keep one in the trunk of my car in a ugly old polyester type case and use it a couple of times a year and its always ready. I personally have several very good Custom Cues and thats all I really use but it wouldn't bother me much to change if I had to.
Also, a Cue Tek cue would be a better buy for a $100 or less than a comparable cheap wooden cue unless you could find a good used sneaky pete or something similiar. The important thing is to get a Cue that feels good in your hands. If the balance or weight doesn't seem right then don't buy it. I hope you have a lot of fun with whatever you end up with...Lord knows you're going to learn humility!

jtlabs
03-12-2006, 09:16 PM
I use a scorpion cue, which is also fiberglass. It shoots straight and it feels very light in my hands(not too light), that is all I can ask for at this point. The way I figure it, if I can get good with a cheap fiberglass cue, then I can only imagine what kind of action I'll get with a custom cue.

Regards,
Jay

mikeindayton
03-13-2006, 12:49 AM
Hi Kevin, this is just an oppinion, but i've been playing for a few years and had the same outlook as you do when I started for about the first 2 years of my game.I started with a Players sneaky pete ($50)and then moved to a Mucci($250) and my game jumpped up about 25-30% with just the change of the cue (once i learned to use it because of the big difference) after about the 9th year again I switched to a Predator 2k4($429) and again my game jumpped up once again maybe another 10-15%. I've now have a Predator 4k7 ($869?) I guess what I'm getting at it depends how much you love the game, to how much you want to invest over time. I've never liked the fiberglass (have tried it) just not for me. Try some different cues if availible see which feels the best to you,worry about the $ when the time comes.
Maybe save some$, I payed for most of my cues through winning small tournements and saving the proceeds to buy cues,and accessories, just an idea! It does take time and patients though. Good Luck!!!


Shoot strong and live forever!!!!!!!!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

hondo
03-13-2006, 07:28 AM
Plus cuetecs are good for fighting your way out
of bars. What's not to like?


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote PastPrime:</font><hr> If you like the feel of the Cue Tek then go ahead and buy it. It will last a long time and if you WEAR A GLOVE it will always remain like new. I keep one in the trunk of my car in a ugly old polyester type case and use it a couple of times a year and its always ready. I personally have several very good Custom Cues and thats all I really use but it wouldn't bother me much to change if I had to.
Also, a Cue Tek cue would be a better buy for a $100 or less than a comparable cheap wooden cue unless you could find a good used sneaky pete or something similiar. The important thing is to get a Cue that feels good in your hands. If the balance or weight doesn't seem right then don't buy it. I hope you have a lot of fun with whatever you end up with...Lord knows you're going to learn humility! <hr /></blockquote>

BLACKHEART
03-13-2006, 09:14 AM
This is a joke. It's like saying "I WANT A NEW CAR ,BUT I ONLY WANT TO SPEND $400". Then save your money, until you can afford what you need. I see players every day playing with these really cheap cues. They're falling apart. They're warped. Thay are just plain junk, but they say that's all they can afford. BULLS--T, these are the same people in the bars, EVERY NIGHT spending large sums of cash of cash. If they would only put $10 a day into a sock, they could buy a decent Q. In the mean time, use all of the different cues you can &amp; figure out what you want &amp; need...JER

ryushen21
03-13-2006, 10:41 AM
Yep. I'll agree with you on that one. That is why a suggested mcdermott or lucasi. Both of those are good quality cues and are relatively close to the price range that he was looking for. I thought it was a good compromise.

Snapshot9
03-13-2006, 12:03 PM
If you are going to play on a regular basis, and want a decent cue, plan on $250. I have played 44 years, and a good Sneaky Pete is worth their weight in gold. I played with a Huebler
SP for 19 years. I still have a custom made SP. You get a lot of cue for the price. Lucasi is a good starter cue, Viking's butts are too big for me. My local cuemaker sells SP's for less than $200 (all joints, w-w, phenolic, SS). You can get a basic custom from him for $275 with choice of woods.

You have to view a cue purchase as an investment, and the 'dividends' it will pay you over the years.

kevinkins
03-13-2006, 06:34 PM
Thanks for the advice ... keep it coming. What is the benefit of fiberglass vs wood ... any pluses and minuses.

Kevin

ryushen21
03-13-2006, 09:32 PM
here is my 2c on the fiberglass vs. wood issue. Wood provides better feel, touch and response. Plus, the joints that i like are wood to wood. Fiberglass, i.e. cuetec, generally do not have the feel that i prefer. In addition cuetec has created severl of their own proprietary joints that, for me, hit too hard.

rackem
03-14-2006, 12:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote kevinkins:</font><hr> Thanks for the advice ... keep it coming. What is the benefit of fiberglass vs wood ... any pluses and minuses.

The only advantage of fiberglass over wood is: If you are not really serious about your game you can always put eyelets on it and turn it into a fishing pole /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif All kidding aside fiberglass will never give you the feel that a wooden cue does. There are perfectly serviceable well made imported cues that are available for less than $100. Please PM me if you need more info.

wolfsburg2
03-19-2006, 06:07 AM
I have owned 2 valley Sneaky Petes as well as 2 custom made Sp's. You can buy a cheap SP for about $60-70 from just about anywhere.

nick55
03-19-2006, 02:47 PM
i have a cuetec that i have played with for a few years, its my first cue, it was a good first cue but when i started looking for a new one i liked the feel of some sneaky petes better so after some searching i ended up w/ a predator sp and i love it and it has a much different (and better in my opinion) feel to it but i still have the cuetech and my friends/girlfriend use it a lot

kevinkins
03-20-2006, 04:28 PM
Also in another thread ...

I spent a few weeks looking into getting a new cue after having my table since last May. The cues I got with the table were fine. But after looking a various $100 cues at the shop over two Saturdays I decided to only upgrade to a $30 one piece cue. (Actually got two) It plays way better than my old cues and fits my skill level. Next year I will treat myself to a more expensive cue. I was very surprised that I did not have to go to $100 to see a difference in play.

- Kevin

bsmutz
03-20-2006, 05:04 PM
I've tried a fiberglass cue a couple of times. They felt sticky to me, too. They definitely won't warp, but they lack the feel of a good wood cue.