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ABQ_Poolhead
03-21-2006, 11:49 AM
Does anyone have a proven method for taking dings out of a cue shaft?

SpiderMan
03-21-2006, 01:09 PM
I use a hypodermic needle to place water droplets into the ding. After the water soaks in, I use a heat gun to cause the area to raise above the surrounding grade. Then lightly sand to knock down the high spot.

You may have to clean the shaft first in order to remove oils and patina that prevent absorbtion of the water droplet. I use rubbing alcohol on a rag for this.

I then seal with carnauba wax and burnish. It's slick as owlshit when I'm done.

SpiderMan

Bob_Jewett
03-21-2006, 02:43 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ABQ_Poolhead:</font><hr> Does anyone have a proven method for taking dings out of a cue shaft? <hr /></blockquote>
There's a whole section on it from a bunch of contributors in the RSB FAQ at http://www.sfbilliards.com/faq.html

See item #9. Most of them involve water, and some require steam.

PlynSets
03-22-2006, 12:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ABQ_Poolhead:</font><hr> Does anyone have a proven method for taking dings out of a cue shaft? <hr /></blockquote>

AQB, man o man you and I must be living similar lives in a parrallel universe as I just went through this recently. I lent my Schon to a friend of mine and luckily he used the shaft I don't primarilly play with, but there was a couple of dings in it. My g/f plays with a Joss and she's pretty new to the game so needless to say there were some dings in it as well. It's pretty nerve racking when your sitting there getting ready to do this and your adding up the $$$$ and not having a clue as to what your doing.

1st off relax.. Shafts aren't that much money as it turns out. I got a 1200.00 Schon, but a new shaft is only a couple hundred bucks at most from Schon. I also had the luxury of trying on the shaft I don't play with before progressing any further so I figured worse comes to worse I'm out a shaft I hardly ever use anyways. After doing it though I found it to be so easy I've been doing it for others at my pool hall for free, and as of recently people have been giving me 30 bucks (didn't ask for it, several offered) in appreciation.

Now as a machinist my mentallity was a "dent" is pushed in material.. I'm going to have to somehow "swell" that material all the way around it beyond the point of the dent so that the dent would become flush with the shaft and then knock off the high spots around it. After my first go at this I quickly learned that was not the case. I also got really technical with it masking off the areas with electrical tape so that just the dent was visible, and then applying hotwater on a towel etc.. etc.. Again in my humble opinion all not necesarry

This is my method of doing it, and I'm sure it might be laughed at, but the results speak for themselves. 1st things 1st.. If you don't have a Q-Wiz go buy one. I think there 7 bucks.. Order one online if you have too, it's essential to the plan here. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif Next get yourself some decent grit sandpaper. I've read where people use 800, 1000, 1200 etc.. Personally I use 600, and I did use 400 once in a pinch again yielding the same results.

First things first, go into your bathroom right now and turn on the sink to straight hot water, next Take your shaft, and under a light feel and look for the dents you want to remove. Take a pen/pencil whatever and mark where the dents are on the shaft. Right about now the water should be hot coming out of the faucet and steaming. Now I'm not sure if you live with a girl or are in good standing with her if you do, but dont' make the mistake of taking one of her "show towels" (That's one of them that sits on the hanger that your not suppose to use I guess?) and using it for this process. As it turns out it causes problems. Get a wash cloth and put a corner of it under the water. Doesn't matter if you get it a little wet, your not trying to just get the tip of it. Maybe a half inch to an inch way from the corner is fine. Squeeze the excess water out of the wash cloth. Take now hot wet towel and put it on the dent of the cue. Many would have you believe that if you touch anywhere except on the dent your in deep... Ya know. Simply not the case, so long as your not soaking the shaft your not going to have any issues. Put it on the dent applying light pressure to the dent and if it happens to be touching a little around the dent it isn't the end of the world.. (as some would have you believe again) Sit there for 3 - 5 minutes and your going to notice that your towel isn't exactly hot anymore. Remove the towel from the shaft and run your fingers over the spot.. Your going to notice it feels "sticky" for lack of a better term. That's normal so no worries. You'll also notice that your cue might have a kind of red or pink color to it on that area, that's normal as well so again no worries. Run your fingers across it to see if you can still feel the dent, odds are you can't. If you can, repeat directions above.

So now as your cue is evaporating off the water you'll notice it's getting less and less sticky.. While it's still warm / damp get your 600 out and tear off a 1 inch by 1 inch square.. Place the square on the shaft and put your index and middle finger on it.. Ever so gently (and I mean gently) Just rub the area you just swelled.. Your not trying to remove material here so again gently. Rub it back and forth slow to medium speed a few times and check it. With 600 etc.. Your barely removing anything (that's the gentle part again). Now get your Q-Wiz out and use the course side then the fine side.. Make sure you use a twisting motion with the Q-Wiz, and when your done the Que should have the surface finish of a mirror after it's burnished. You would be amazed at what you can take out with this method.

I'll explain my "theory" on this so it kind of makes sense. It's not swelling the whole area up past the point of the dent and then sanding it back down to flush. Wood is "springy" by nature (which is why we use it for pool cues). The dent has just been "compressed" and all your doing is giving it the means to spring back to it's original shape. The wood around the dent will swell, but it's very temporary and will begin to return back to it's original size almost by the time you start sanding. The light sanding is to "blend" any MINOR (and I'm talkign .003 of an inch here.. or less then the average human hair) inconsistencies between the two surfaces.. The Q-Wiz is to bring it back to a uniform finish.

This is something that I was scared to death to try, and now I do it on almost a nightly basis. I just last night fixed a guys cue that was knocked over onto a bar stool and judging by the dents bounced two or three times before it hit the floor. 3 major "gashes" for lack of a better term on the upper portion of his shaft. I was even amazed when they came out. Wood is pretty resilient (sp?) and is alot tougher then I think we give it credit for.

DJ

SPetty
03-22-2006, 03:22 PM
Howdy PlynSets,

That was a great read, thanks. That's almost the same conclusion I came to, so now that you've done the hard part of explaining it, I can simply adjust your explanations to fit what I do:

Rather than a washcloth, I use a q-tip to minimize the surrounding wood effects. I wet it with hot water and lay it on the ding until I feel like checking it and doing it again. Sometimes that's overnight.

I don't use sandpaper. After all is swelled and unswelled, I simply burnish 'til hot with leather. Occasionally there's still a small swell, but it does go away in time.

Anyway, interesting how we independently came to almost the same conclusion even in the face of so much different advice!

I don't care to use sandpaper because it removes material, and I don't care to use a glass or glass rod because it smashes the wood fibers.

lukeinva
03-22-2006, 10:19 PM
Just take an ice cube rub it over the dent, then take a buisness card or paper napkin and rub the shaft vigorusly (sp) until your hand cant take the heat, you may have to do this a couple times but the dent will pop out.

NBC-BOB
03-23-2006, 06:58 AM
I just turn on the tea kettle, and carefully steam them out.
Works great, and you don't wind up with a toothpick, from sanding.

Snapshot9
03-23-2006, 07:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote PlynSets:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote ABQ_Poolhead:</font><hr> Does anyone have a proven method for taking dings out of a cue shaft? <hr /></blockquote>

AQB, man o man you and I must be living similar lives in a parrallel universe as I just went through this recently. I lent my Schon to a friend of mine and luckily he used the shaft I don't primarilly play with, but there was a couple of dings in it. My g/f plays with a Joss and she's pretty new to the game so needless to say there were some dings in it as well. It's pretty nerve racking when your sitting there getting ready to do this and your adding up the $$$$ and not having a clue as to what your doing.

1st off relax.. Shafts aren't that much money as it turns out. I got a 1200.00 Schon, but a new shaft is only a couple hundred bucks at most from Schon. I also had the luxury of trying on the shaft I don't play with before progressing any further so I figured worse comes to worse I'm out a shaft I hardly ever use anyways. After doing it though I found it to be so easy I've been doing it for others at my pool hall for free, and as of recently people have been giving me 30 bucks (didn't ask for it, several offered) in appreciation.

Now as a machinist my mentallity was a "dent" is pushed in material.. I'm going to have to somehow "swell" that material all the way around it beyond the point of the dent so that the dent would become flush with the shaft and then knock off the high spots around it. After my first go at this I quickly learned that was not the case. I also got really technical with it masking off the areas with electrical tape so that just the dent was visible, and then applying hotwater on a towel etc.. etc.. Again in my humble opinion all not necesarry

This is my method of doing it, and I'm sure it might be laughed at, but the results speak for themselves. 1st things 1st.. If you don't have a Q-Wiz go buy one. I think there 7 bucks.. Order one online if you have too, it's essential to the plan here. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif Next get yourself some decent grit sandpaper. I've read where people use 800, 1000, 1200 etc.. Personally I use 600, and I did use 400 once in a pinch again yielding the same results.

First things first, go into your bathroom right now and turn on the sink to straight hot water, next Take your shaft, and under a light feel and look for the dents you want to remove. Take a pen/pencil whatever and mark where the dents are on the shaft. Right about now the water should be hot coming out of the faucet and steaming. Now I'm not sure if you live with a girl or are in good standing with her if you do, but dont' make the mistake of taking one of her "show towels" (That's one of them that sits on the hanger that your not suppose to use I guess?) and using it for this process. As it turns out it causes problems. Get a wash cloth and put a corner of it under the water. Doesn't matter if you get it a little wet, your not trying to just get the tip of it. Maybe a half inch to an inch way from the corner is fine. Squeeze the excess water out of the wash cloth. Take now hot wet towel and put it on the dent of the cue. Many would have you believe that if you touch anywhere except on the dent your in deep... Ya know. Simply not the case, so long as your not soaking the shaft your not going to have any issues. Put it on the dent applying light pressure to the dent and if it happens to be touching a little around the dent it isn't the end of the world.. (as some would have you believe again) Sit there for 3 - 5 minutes and your going to notice that your towel isn't exactly hot anymore. Remove the towel from the shaft and run your fingers over the spot.. Your going to notice it feels "sticky" for lack of a better term. That's normal so no worries. You'll also notice that your cue might have a kind of red or pink color to it on that area, that's normal as well so again no worries. Run your fingers across it to see if you can still feel the dent, odds are you can't. If you can, repeat directions above.

So now as your cue is evaporating off the water you'll notice it's getting less and less sticky.. While it's still warm / damp get your 600 out and tear off a 1 inch by 1 inch square.. Place the square on the shaft and put your index and middle finger on it.. Ever so gently (and I mean gently) Just rub the area you just swelled.. Your not trying to remove material here so again gently. Rub it back and forth slow to medium speed a few times and check it. With 600 etc.. Your barely removing anything (that's the gentle part again). Now get your Q-Wiz out and use the course side then the fine side.. Make sure you use a twisting motion with the Q-Wiz, and when your done the Que should have the surface finish of a mirror after it's burnished. You would be amazed at what you can take out with this method.

I'll explain my "theory" on this so it kind of makes sense. It's not swelling the whole area up past the point of the dent and then sanding it back down to flush. Wood is "springy" by nature (which is why we use it for pool cues). The dent has just been "compressed" and all your doing is giving it the means to spring back to it's original shape. The wood around the dent will swell, but it's very temporary and will begin to return back to it's original size almost by the time you start sanding. The light sanding is to "blend" any MINOR (and I'm talkign .003 of an inch here.. or less then the average human hair) inconsistencies between the two surfaces.. The Q-Wiz is to bring it back to a uniform finish.

This is something that I was scared to death to try, and now I do it on almost a nightly basis. I just last night fixed a guys cue that was knocked over onto a bar stool and judging by the dents bounced two or three times before it hit the floor. 3 major "gashes" for lack of a better term on the upper portion of his shaft. I was even amazed when they came out. Wood is pretty resilient (sp?) and is alot tougher then I think we give it credit for.

DJ <hr /></blockquote>

If it was a $200 cue, I could understand it, but to LOAN
a $1200 cue out is out of the realm of common sense to me.
Other people do not have the respect for your property like
you do. I don't let anyone borrow my cues, except maybe my
break cue to break with, amd it is not an expensive one.

PlynSets
03-23-2006, 04:21 PM
[ QUOTE ]
If it was a $200 cue, I could understand it, but to LOAN
a $1200 cue out is out of the realm of common sense to me.
Other people do not have the respect for your property like
you do. I don't let anyone borrow my cues, except maybe my
break cue to break with, amd it is not an expensive one.
<hr /></blockquote>

The guy is a stand up guy.. Point in fact he used to have a couple Schon's there were higher up the food chain then mine. He quit playing awhile back and sold everything vowed never to play again etc.. He wanted to goto the pool hall gave me a call and I couldn't go with him so I told him have at it. He's good for it if everything went south so I wasn't really worried. The dents just kinda happened. He takes care of everything he owns, so for all I know (being that I rarely if ever use that shaft) might've already been on there.

DJ

Wazoodust
04-19-2006, 12:53 PM
I've had good success with a steam iron and a towel. I first clean then wrap the shaft in a couple of layers of thowel, and then slowly iron over the shaft concentrating on the areas with the dings,sometimes I have to do this twice. After it cools, I lightly use a white scothbrite pad and reapply a finish to it. I've been able to remove almost any ding with this unless the grain of the wood is broken

walt8880
04-19-2006, 07:21 PM
This week I removed and inch long ding/scratch from my shaft using the damp towel, steam iron method.

Got it out and burnished with leather. Now can't even tell there was anything there.

Whole process took about 30-45 min. as I was being very careful. I did just "touch" the scratch area with 600 paper before the steaming to remove any finish to let the water/steam penetrate better. No sanding at all required after, only burnishing.

CaptainHook
04-20-2006, 01:15 PM
What was the method where you used a spoon? I remember someone telling me about that once?

Brad
04-20-2006, 01:24 PM
Buy a new shaft. It's only money!