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View Full Version : WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO MAKE A CUE?



BLACKHEART
07-04-2002, 08:14 PM
I just recomended this article to heater451 who posts here. I think you will find it interesting reading...JER
www.cuemakers.org/aca-maq.htm (http://www.cuemakers.org/aca-maq.htm)

Troy
07-04-2002, 08:37 PM
Precisely why I am happy to stay as a Repair Guy.

Troy

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: BLACKHEART:</font><hr> I just recomended this article to heater451 who posts here. I think you will find it interesting reading...JER
<a target="_blank" href=http://www.cuemakers.org/aca-maq.htm>www.cuemakers.org/aca-maq.htm</a> <hr></blockquote>

stickman
07-04-2002, 10:31 PM
This one is the one that opened my eyes. http://www.barringercues.com/howbilcueisb.html

I have great respect for cuemakers. I would like to accumulate the equipment to be able to do quality repairs, but don't think I have a desire to build them.

Q-guy
07-04-2002, 11:34 PM
I read that a while back. Don't you think he is a little cynical in his attitude. He said once in an article he spends $500.00 a month on tooling. Is he nuts! Except for cutters or an occasional tool repair, I think I could build cues the rest of my life with the tools I have right now and pass them on to someone else. He is trying to make what he does sound like more then it is. Building cues is just a trade like anything else. It is easily learned and with the right tools can be pursued by anyone interested. I think the reason many quit is they did not realize it was going to be a job. I also don't get why he feels you need to put in 80 hours a week. If you do things in an efficient manner and set up systems for your work, you can easily build 100 cues a year working a 40 hour week. The biggest problem is you are self employed and must manage your money and business. Something that may take as much skill as building the cues. I have been to cuemakers shops that have become hang outs for pool players with nothing better to do. They come for a tip and stay three hours. These guys wonder why they are a year behind on their orders. Where I am I have a 1200 foot free standing building on the back of my property and gates in the front. No one gets past the gates.

Voodoo Daddy
07-05-2002, 01:06 AM
I've been meaning to talk to you about that fence. When are you gonna let me come visit?

Big Steve...Voodoo's alter-ego

griffith_d
07-05-2002, 05:53 AM
I have seen this article,...it is a good one.

Griff

BLACKHEART
07-05-2002, 08:08 AM
Whenever you put something down on paper you leave yourself open to be picked apart, for what you've written. Although in this article, I didn't see anything about "$500 a month for tooling", he does say that he spent $1000 for the chuck on his lathe. I wouldn't know about things like that, I bought most of my stuff used. The article does have SOME merit in that there are definitly hazards &amp; costs that even I didn't imagine when I started. As I have explained to some would be cue makers,don't even think about making Qs til you tackle the problem of the spraying of the finish coat. Don't just think you'll spray them in your basement. The article is by no means perfect, but it does give you some grounding &amp; some base to start some planning. I have never made Qs full time, but even part time, I can make 30 Qs in the $500-$1000 range a year &amp; do repair work too. I think you are right that a 40 hour week should produce a goodly amount of $500 plus Qs. Cue making isn't brain surgery, but still in all, not everyone is cut out for it. I have been doing it for 16 years &amp; I still love it. I hope that some of those showing an interest now, will persue it as at least a part time thing...JER

07-05-2002, 09:26 AM
I can't determine from Mr Buss's article if he is trying to encourage people to become cue makers, discourage them, or merely point out that it isn't easy. Having been in business most of my life it is my observation that business is never easy or without risk. Making the worlds best cue and making money doing it requires much more than cue making skills. Success rarely happens without a good business plan. For everyone with talent I encourage them to proceed at their own level albeit cautiously.

PQQLK9
07-05-2002, 01:23 PM
A couple of nights ago on Nightline a Famous Guitar maker was asked how to make a guitar...his answer was to take a piece of wood and a knife and cut away everything that don't look like a guitar.....For all aspiring cuemakers substitute cue for guitar..../ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

heater451
07-05-2002, 04:27 PM
Wasn't that idea originally from DaVinci. . .or Michelangelo?

BLACKHEART
07-06-2002, 12:03 AM
I like that. I'm gonna use that, in the future. When people ask me , " how long does it take to make a pool cue" I usually say " It takes a week to put the finish on &amp; a little longer to make the cue"...JER

Cueless Joey
07-08-2002, 12:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Q-guy:</font><hr> I read that a while back. Don't you think he is a little cynical in his attitude. He said once in an article he spends $500.00 a month on tooling. Is he nuts! Except for cutters or an occasional tool repair, I think I could build cues the rest of my life with the tools I have right now and pass them on to someone else. He is trying to make what he does sound like more then it is. Building cues is just a trade like anything else. It is easily learned and with the right tools can be pursued by anyone interested. I think the reason many quit is they did not realize it was going to be a job. I also don't get why he feels you need to put in 80 hours a week. If you do things in an efficient manner and set up systems for your work, you can easily build 100 cues a year working a 40 hour week. The biggest problem is you are self employed and must manage your money and business. Something that may take as much skill as building the cues. I have been to cuemakers shops that have become hang outs for pool players with nothing better to do. They come for a tip and stay three hours. These guys wonder why they are a year behind on their orders. Where I am I have a 1200 foot free standing building on the back of my property and gates in the front. No one gets past the gates. <hr></blockquote>..........
QG, you hit the nail on the head on this one. My local cuemaker is a very good cuemaker but is not good in managing his time and priorities. He makes and repairs cues FULLTIME in his rented house. My cue which just needs a last coat of finish has been sitting for weeks now. He takes in way too much piddly repairs. I have no idea how a 30 dollar ferrule repair gets priority over a 900 dollar cue. He should do repairs AFTER all his cue work is done for the day. His phone rings all day. Why he takes them, I have no idea. What good is it for him to talk how good his cues are while he can't even finish his orders? I've been to his shop twice this week to check on my cue. Last Wednesday he was cutting and threading delrin buttcaps. I asked him why he just didn't have them manufactured. His reply was he likes MAKING all his parts. Then yesterday, he was cutting paper-based phenolics so he can make his version of Corsair's black beauty which noone has ordered yet. In the meantime, his unfinished cues sit in the shelf. 5 of which just needs one last coat and polish. Cuemaking is a business as you said QG. Alienating your customers will catch up to you eventually. Not being able to deliver cues in time due to bad time management is one good way to tick off customers.
Cuemaking is not rocket science. As you said setup is the key. If one lathe is already setup to turn down a dowel to an oversized forearm, why not turn down more dowels so you'll have a ton of oversized forearms in the shelf?