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View Full Version : RichR pictures of Valley Forge



DickLeonard
04-11-2006, 11:35 AM
Rich R I was going thru your pictures of the players and almost all of the players were shooting over their left eye. Are that many players left eye dominate or do they all need some stance correction.

I watched a junior playing and his fundamentals were flawless. Totally impressed me with his playing, he lost his match only due to his lack of height. He finished in the 5/6 position.####

Rich R.
04-11-2006, 12:57 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Rich R I was going thru your pictures of the players and almost all of the players were shooting over their left eye. Are that many players left eye dominate or do they all need some stance correction.

I watched a junior playing and his fundamentals were flawless. Totally impressed me with his playing, he lost his match only due to his lack of height. He finished in the 5/6 position.#### <hr /></blockquote>
Dick, I only take the pictures. I will leave it up to you, to analyze them. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

DickLeonard
04-20-2006, 09:37 AM
RichR were those pictures taken in Battle or were they posed for?####

dg-in-centralpa
04-20-2006, 09:46 AM
Mine was battle, but I lost. /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

DG

Rich R.
04-20-2006, 06:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> RichR were those pictures taken in Battle or were they posed for?#### <hr /></blockquote>
Dick, any of my pictures, of a player at a table playing pool, have been taken during the heat of battle. I happen to take a small bit of pride in that fact.
We all have our opinions of what makes a good picture. I find that I do not get what I want, in posed pictures. Therefore, I concentrate on taking pictures of actual matches. It is a little bit more difficult, but I believe the results are worth it. I hope everyone else agrees. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Terry
04-21-2006, 07:17 AM
Hi Rich, You must have a really good camera when your able to take indoor pictures without a flash and have the pictures that clear and bright, do you mind my asking you what model camera your were using? Very good pictures BTW.I bought a digital camera a couple of years ago and it is not very good indoors where their is any distance to the subject or low light and thats with the flash. Terry

Rich R.
04-21-2006, 09:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Terry:</font><hr> Hi Rich, You must have a really good camera when your able to take indoor pictures without a flash and have the pictures that clear and bright, do you mind my asking you what model camera your were using? <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="red">The camera I used for all of the pictures I posted is a Canon EOS 10D Digital SLR. At the time it was purchased, it was Canon's top of the line amateur camera and kind of a link to their professional cameras. Because of newer models, mine is obsolete now and, I believe, no longer available. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

In conjuntion with that camera, I was using a EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS USM zoom lens, which is an excellent lens for many situations, including low light photography. </font color>

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Terry:</font><hr>Very good pictures BTW.<hr /></blockquote>

<font color="red"> Thank you very much. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif </font color>

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Terry:</font><hr>I bought a digital camera a couple of years ago and it is not very good indoors where their is any distance to the subject or low light and thats with the flash. Terry <hr /></blockquote>
<font color="red">The average camera, digital or film, will not do a good job under pool tournament conditions and other low light situations.

If you check your manual, you will find that the light from the flash falls off fairly quickly, with distance. This is especially true, if you are only using a small built in flash on the camera. They are not very powerful.

In low light situations, with distance involved, turn off your flash and set your camera at all of the most sensitive settings and try working from there. Again, you will have to check your manual for the best way to do this, if it is possible with your camera.

Good luck. </font color>

TimFXF
04-21-2006, 10:48 AM
They don't sell the 10D anymore, but you can find them on ebay and at camera shops. They make a 20D and a 5D, but I've never used them. (I use the 1D Mark II's...)

The important factor is really the lens when shooting in low light. A 2.8 f-stop should do the trick, but you should play with the ISO settings to find the best mix of speed and quality. The problem with shooting a pool table is the light is concentrated on the table and falls off on the player as they shoot from the rails. If you're looking to get the shooters you might need to sacrifice overexposing the table a bit to expose for the players face. Of course there's always Photoshop to tweak the final images! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif