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CoconutMikey
04-24-2006, 08:53 AM
I find that when I put my bridge hand very close to the CB that I have a lot more control (stop and draw are very easy). I find it tougher to stop and draw when my bridge hand is farther from the CB. How far back to you place your bridge, on average?

randyg
04-24-2006, 09:01 AM
My Standard Operating Bridge Length is 8 inches. Back of cueball to thumb V.....SPF-randyg

bsmutz
04-24-2006, 10:12 AM
It varies depending on the stroke. When the cue ball is close to the object ball or the rail, I use a shorter bridge. Also when my stroking arm isn't in a normal position (jacked up, off to the side, etc.) I'll use a shorter bridge. My feeling is that the farther the bridge is away from the cue ball, the more variation in the cue tip placement on the cue ball due to small anomalies in the straightness of the stroke (back hand). Normally, 8" to 10".

Scott Lee
04-24-2006, 05:47 PM
Mine is the same as Randy's...about 8" on average.

Scott Lee

BurloakB
06-15-2006, 02:52 AM
I use 8-10" as well. For draw shots I may go with 8-9", and with follow shots I go with 9-10". If I'm playing a delicate safety I may go with a 5" bridge. Elevation and the cue ball being frozen to the rail changes everything, and each shot is it's own baby.

The bridge length shouldn't affect the quality of spin, it's purely mental. Most people change their grip tension when they have to use tops or bottoms, namely they grip too tightly. If they remember to keep a relaxed grip they'll spin the cue ball like crazy.

Follow (over-spin) is an illusion anyway, it's just natural roll and you get that hitting a half tip over center. Bottom does require a little more attention, but most people error on the side of forgetting to follow through.

I can generate as much spin with a 10" bridge as I can with a 6" bridge because I'm comfortable with long bridge lengths. Someone who feels more confident with a 6" bridge should stick to what feels best.

This is another one of those, "there is no right answer" queries.

randyg
06-16-2006, 04:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BurloakB:</font><hr> I use 8-10" as well. For draw shots I may go with 8-9", and with follow shots I go with 9-10". If I'm playing a delicate safety I may go with a 5" bridge. Elevation and the cue ball being frozen to the rail changes everything, and each shot is it's own baby.

The bridge length shouldn't affect the quality of spin, it's purely mental. Most people change their grip tension when they have to use tops or bottoms, namely they grip too tightly. If they remember to keep a relaxed grip they'll spin the cue ball like crazy.

Follow (over-spin) is an illusion anyway, it's just natural roll and you get that hitting a half tip over center. Bottom does require a little more attention, but most people error on the side of forgetting to follow through.

I can generate as much spin with a 10" bridge as I can with a 6" bridge because I'm comfortable with long bridge lengths. Someone who feels more confident with a 6" bridge should stick to what feels best.

This is another one of those, "there is no right answer" queries. <hr /></blockquote>

Once a player finds their Standard Operating Bridge Length which now includes their "Sweet Spot", changing bridge lengths could be very dangerous unless the back hand changes also. Being out ofg your Sweet Spot will certainly change the quality of your entire stroke....SPF-randyg

BurloakB
06-16-2006, 10:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> Once a player finds their Standard Operating Bridge Length which now includes their "Sweet Spot", changing bridge lengths could be very dangerous unless the back hand changes also. Being out ofg your Sweet Spot will certainly change the quality of your entire stroke....SPF-randyg <hr /></blockquote>
It's understood.

I move my hand all over the grip area, that's why the linen wrap is so long, because a dynamic player must grip wherever is required in order to keep their forearm perpendicular to the floor. Sometimes I'm gripping at the very back of the wrap, sometimes near the middle, but I'm always comfortable and not constricted, (or stretched).

I know the sensation of my cueing sweet spot, and can achieve it at any bridge length, short or long. The sweet spot has more to do with where I'm gripping the butt of my cue than how long my bridge is.

Besides, "Danger" is my middle name.

tjlmbklr
06-17-2006, 04:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Mine is the same as Randy's...about 8" on average.

Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>

You might remeber mine from my lessons Scott. I think mine was about half the cue lenght...LOL. But I decided to shorten it up. I found I have better control for tip posistion when I pull the trigger on the shot(s).

CoconutMikey, this is the reason you probably get better control. I also can stop on a dime, and draw with more accuracy when up close. But the only time I am less the 8" from the CB, is because the Cb is to close to the OB for follow through. That is one of the best things Scott tought me, choke up(back hand) on shots like that, and still swing the arm to full close, and you'll be amazed at what you can do with the rock from that close.

Sorry Scott I will try not to give away too many secrets...LOL

TJ

recoveryjones
06-23-2006, 10:58 PM
I noticed from watching some older Accu-stat straight pool videos that the bridges were for the most part around 8". In the newer 9 ball DVD's, I notice that 11"-12" is not at all uncommon.

My guessing is that nine ball requires a lot more around the table power shots, whilst sraight pool is more of a half table finnesse game.

I did notice that Buddy Hall had no trouble playing nine ball and generating power with a short bridge.He does however, nearly pull the cue right through his bridge hand and applies one of the sweetest smoothest strokes I've ever seen.

At the amatuer level if you unwantingly apply say 1/8 tip of right english with a short 8" bridge, you will probably be applying 1/4 tip of right english with a 12" bridge.
The merits of a short bridge seem to be a more accurate hit on the cue ball, while a longer bridge seems to generate more power.Most amatuers would probably do better with a shorter bridge.
RJ

Fran Crimi
06-24-2006, 06:21 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I did notice that Buddy Hall had no trouble playing nine ball and generating power with a short bridge. <hr /></blockquote>

See...no offense meant here, but this is how good information becomes bad information because important facts are left out.

If you're going to discuss Buddy's short bridge, make sure you mention his head height over the cue. The two go together. You would be doing your fellow players a disservice by leaving out such key information. Players who stand low to their shots traditionally don't use short bridge lengths because it's an issue of vision.

Fran

recoveryjones
06-24-2006, 10:27 AM
Good point you've brought up on head height and I'm glad you mentioned it.
RJ

Qtec
06-25-2006, 06:24 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I can generate as much spin with a 10" bridge as I can with a 6" bridge because I'm comfortable with long bridge lengths. Someone who feels more confident with a 6" bridge should stick to what feels best.

This is another one of those, "there is no right answer" queries. <hr /></blockquote>

I think there is a right answer! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

The length of the bridge can affect the timing of the stroke. Everything all depends on how hard you have to hit the ball.
I contend that you can't hit a ball as hard with a 6 inch bridge Vs a 10 inch bridge without affecting the stroke. If you need to bring the cue back 10 inches to smoothly execute the stroke, then you need a long bridge. Anything less and you will be 'forcing', which is never good.
When you are in stroke, the bridge length is not important. The bridge hand on the line of the shot is.
Generally speaking, the harder the shot the longer the bridge, but depending on what game you play, a close bridge is adequate and sometimes an advantage. eg more accurate striking on the QB, less margin of error.

If you can play with a long bridge , you can use the same bridge on almost every shot wicth might also be an advantage? You can also play soft shots with a long bridge!

It all depends on the player.

Qtec

BurloakB
06-25-2006, 07:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
I can generate as much spin with a 10" bridge as I can with a 6" bridge because I'm comfortable with long bridge lengths. Someone who feels more confident with a 6" bridge should stick to what feels best.

This is another one of those, "there is no right answer" queries. <hr /></blockquote>

I think there is a right answer! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

The length of the bridge can affect the timing of the stroke. Everything all depends on how hard you have to hit the ball.
I contend that you can't hit a ball as hard with a 6 inch bridge Vs a 10 inch bridge without affecting the stroke. If you need to bring the cue back 10 inches to smoothly execute the stroke, then you need a long bridge. Anything less and you will be 'forcing', which is never good.
When you are in stroke, the bridge length is not important. The bridge hand on the line of the shot is.
Generally speaking, the harder the shot the longer the bridge, but depending on what game you play, a close bridge is adequate and sometimes an advantage. eg more accurate striking on the QB, less margin of error.

If you can play with a long bridge , you can use the same bridge on almost every shot wicth might also be an advantage? You can also play soft shots with a long bridge!

It all depends on the player.

Qtec <hr /></blockquote>
I said, "This is another one of those, "there is no right answer" queries".

You said, [/i]"it all depends on the player".[/i]

Six or half a dozen.

If every player feels differently about it, then there cannot be one answer for everyone.

Stretch
06-25-2006, 02:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BurloakB:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
I can generate as much spin with a 10" bridge as I can with a 6" bridge because I'm comfortable with long bridge lengths. Someone who feels more confident with a 6" bridge should stick to what feels best.

This is another one of those, "there is no right answer" queries. <hr /></blockquote>

I think there is a right answer! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

The length of the bridge can affect the timing of the stroke. Everything all depends on how hard you have to hit the ball.
I contend that you can't hit a ball as hard with a 6 inch bridge Vs a 10 inch bridge without affecting the stroke. If you need to bring the cue back 10 inches to smoothly execute the stroke, then you need a long bridge. Anything less and you will be 'forcing', which is never good.
When you are in stroke, the bridge length is not important. The bridge hand on the line of the shot is.
Generally speaking, the harder the shot the longer the bridge, but depending on what game you play, a close bridge is adequate and sometimes an advantage. eg more accurate striking on the QB, less margin of error.

If you can play with a long bridge , you can use the same bridge on almost every shot wicth might also be an advantage? You can also play soft shots with a long bridge!

It all depends on the player.

Qtec <hr /></blockquote>
I said, "This is another one of those, "there is no right answer" queries".

You said, [/i]"it all depends on the player".[/i]

Six or half a dozen.

If every player feels differently about it, then there cannot be one answer for everyone. <hr /></blockquote>

When your talking bridge length eveyone is assumeing you have enough room to pick the most comforable bridge you like. I see the better players are quite careful getting the cueball into the open for good bridging/cueing even if it means attacking the next ball from a little sharper angle.

I think to be really successful though you need to practice a lot of different bridges. Open, Looped, off the rail, over balls, up close, far away. Your going to need them all, sometimes all in the same rack! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif St.