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CoconutMikey
04-26-2006, 05:34 AM
What drills do you use in a typical practice session and how long do you practice?

I start off by working just on cue ball control. I then work on my cut shots all over the table. Then sometimes I practice banks and kicks. Finally, I shoot about 10 racks of 9-ball and practice position.

How do you practice?

DickLeonard
04-26-2006, 06:27 AM
CoconutMikey. I was to play in a tournament game I warmed up with the balls all over the table. I never made two balls in a row.

I won the lag and ran 115 balls on my first shot. After that I saw the benefit of practicing your misses and saving your best for the tournaments.####

randyg
04-26-2006, 09:08 AM
I practice in semi-private conditions. I start with my Mother Drills for 15 minutes then move on. The next 5-10 minutes are spent practicing the things that went wrong during my last competition.

I never practice a week before competition.....SPF-randyg

SPetty
04-26-2006, 10:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> I never practice a week before competition.....<hr /></blockquote>Do you not pick up a cue for that week, or are you saying you don't do your practice routine? Do you shoot racks instead of practice the week before competition?

randyg
04-26-2006, 02:07 PM
SPETTY: No Mother Drills-No Practice. I SPARR as hard as I can. Any one of my friends are willing to take some cash off me, if they can. Find a few tournaments to play in. Do anything but get analytical in practice routines. It's just too late to install any thing new in our game a few weeks before a major tournament....SPF-randyg

wolfdancer
04-26-2006, 02:13 PM
Practice your misses before......good idea !!!

I have a superstition about winning all my pre-tournament practice games....
I practice similiar to how I used to see Gerda do, and finish off with some cut shots/ rail shots/ and draw shots.
RandyG would throw me out of his school...I'm too undisciplined for his practice regime. But if a guy really wants to improve....that looks like a way to go.
It only takes him 10 min to practice correcting his last tournament errors? The days jes ain't long enough to figger out what I did wrong last time.

pooltchr
04-26-2006, 03:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> It only takes him 10 min to practice correcting his last tournament errors? The days jes ain't long enough to figger out what I did wrong last time.
<hr /></blockquote>

You should take his class. One of the best things I got out of it was learning how to know what exactly went wrong when I miss a shot, and knowing what kind of adjustment to make to correct it.
I've seen his practice drills, one to cover just about any specific problem area you might encounter. Identify the problem, pick the drill to fix it, and then GO PLAY!!! It really works!
Steve

wolfdancer
04-26-2006, 04:17 PM
Steve, My friend recently went through the class, and felt like he got his money's worth.
He visited here, the same week i had the flu, but I did get to
see what the practice drills are like, and see the value of them. I might have gotten a little more insight into the course itself, but I just couldn't concentrate on pool that week.
At my age though, pool is just a social event for me, and I win enough to cover expenses. I'd have to get really serious to make over my entire game, get rid of this one of a kind stroke, and have some long range plans...
In the last issue of Golf Digest, the editors were worried about getting older, going from 49 to 50, and comparing that
age to the 14th hole of a round of golf.
I figure I'm either putting out on #16, or in the fairway on #17...and I'm hoping for a playoff, to extend the match ..

wolfdancer
04-26-2006, 04:33 PM
Steve, I checked out your site....pretty neat....good photos.
I saw a Bob and a Robert, name tags (what, no Billy Bobs?)
Can't figure out though which one is you?
Anyway, it looks like a great setting to attend a class on pool.
I can't tell you how bad the instruction was about 10 or 15 years ago. After wasting my hard earned welfare check (jes kidding) on a few "instructors" back then, I was turned off, and anything I learned from then on was courtesy of tapes, books, etc.
And learned it all without a decent setup, and without a stroke.

Scott Lee
04-26-2006, 06:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr>
I can't tell you how bad the instruction was about 10 or 15 years ago. After wasting my hard earned welfare check (jes kidding) on a few "instructors" back then, I was turned off, and anything I learned from then on was courtesy of tapes, books, etc.
And learned it all without a decent setup, and without a stroke.
<hr /></blockquote>

Jack...I take exception to that comment. You took a 2-hr lesson from me, several years ago, when you still lived in SF, before you moved to WA...and you told me your stroke was much improved because of it. Are you taking that back?

Scott

pooltchr
04-26-2006, 07:38 PM
Thanks for the compliment on the site. I can't take credit though. I have someone who keeps it up for me...I do well to remember how to sign on to the forums, much less build a web site.
In the last picture with the 5 instructors, they are left to right, John Hendrick, myself, RandyG, Bob (Cane) Nunley, and Michael Mercer.
And fun doesn't even begin to describe that weekend!!! I am really looking forward to doing it again this October.
Steve

ryushen21
04-26-2006, 08:06 PM
I have two different practice routines. If i find that i have fallen into a funk or something is just plain wrong with my game, i start out by watching the video of my lesson and reviewing the notes that i have taken from it. Then i go back and shoot all the drills from said video. Everything from stroke speed to draw shots to straight shots.

As far as my regular practice/just shooting around routine. I start out shooting 4 racks randomly spread out, no break shot. Then i shoot two races to 9 of nine ball against the ghost (1 shot handicap). Then i finish everything off with 5 racks of straight pool. I usually do that 2 to 3 times a week and it seems to keep me pretty sharp.

I also shoot league 1-2 nights per week. But i still need to develop my game more.

wolfdancer
04-27-2006, 12:21 AM
Scott, you were not meant to be included in the ten or 15 years ago, group. If I can borrow a phrase from the "Monk" your lesson "pointed the way"
I could give that pre lesson meatball the 7....

Stretch
04-27-2006, 10:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ryushen21:</font><hr> I have two different practice routines. If i find that i have fallen into a funk or something is just plain wrong with my game, i start out by watching the video of my lesson and reviewing the notes that i have taken from it. Then i go back and shoot all the drills from said video. Everything from stroke speed to draw shots to straight shots.

As far as my regular practice/just shooting around routine. I start out shooting 4 racks randomly spread out, no break shot. Then i shoot two races to 9 of nine ball against the ghost (1 shot handicap). Then i finish everything off with 5 racks of straight pool. I usually do that 2 to 3 times a week and it seems to keep me pretty sharp.

I also shoot league 1-2 nights per week. But i still need to develop my game more. <hr /></blockquote>

Sounds like a pretty well rounded routine. When your just in your shooting around mode with the balls spread out you might like to try spreading them out (nothing close to the rails) and running them down without going to a rail with the cue ball. It's an awsome drill and deceptively difficult. It realy develops good pattern play, cue ball control, and being on the right side of your next shot. St.

Scott Lee
04-27-2006, 05:02 PM
Steve...and THIS time I'll be there, for sure, too! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Scott

pooltchr
04-27-2006, 05:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Steve...and THIS time I'll be there, for sure, too! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Scott <hr /></blockquote>

I hope so! I still haven't met the new bride!!!
End of October. It's going to be a blast! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif
Steve

jimbojim
04-27-2006, 10:59 PM
I do a few racks with all the 15 balls on the table and I start the first shot with ball in hand and I try not to bump into any other balls. Once I'm warmed up, I do a few racks of 9-ball by myself and I use pocket change that I put under the Cueball and object ball and another for my desired cueball position after the shot and I practice the spins to have a good control.

After that, I practice what we call target pool, I have a binder full of exercices of setups to pocket a ball and pratice to put some english to position the cueball on a target with points and I calculate my average.

As for the conclusion, I go back to 9-ball again but no pocket change...the real deal.

BurloakB
06-15-2006, 02:21 AM
When practicing by myself I go in with a plan and stick to it. No more than 1.5 hours, unless warming up for an event. Then maybe 2 hours. An hour of disciplined practice beats 4 hours of ball banging anyday.

1. Start with playing the ghost 8ball just to loosen up, (3 racks).

2. Once in the groove, move on to playing the ghost 9ball, (3 racks).

3. Then onto playing the ghost straight pool, (2 racks). Might substitute one pocket depending on my mood.

4. Bank drill. String balls 1-9 in a straight line along center line of half a table Take ball in hand for each shot, working from closest to furthest from the pocket. Do right side and left side so as to not develop a weak or strong side. (2-4 minutes approx.).

5. Thin cut into side pocket drill. String balls 1-9 on a 45 degree angle across bottom half of table. Work from closest to furthest from pocket . Do right side and left side, same as above. (2-4 minutes).

6. Rail shots with hard angles drill. Place a ball mid-way up top half of the long rail. Cueball in hand from 45 degree angle and practice 5 shots with inside and 5 shots with outside english. Both sides of table for this one as well. If I miss, start over again until I don't miss.

7. Pot and draw position drill. Place 9 balls in a half moon around the side pocket about 1 inch apart. Start potting on one side and draw back into position for the next shot. No ball in hand here. A miss, I start over. Cueball cannot touch any rails. Work from both sides on this one as well.

8. Long Shot to position drill. Mark the OB and CB with paper reinforcement rings. Pot the OB and go one rail for position, then two rails, then three. Great for learning speed control and calculating an unfamiliar table's speed.

9. Combination drill. Set up random combos, all differing and attempt to pot the lead ball. Must also gain position on middle ball, as if these are my last two OB's before the money ball.

10. Jacked and rail shots drill. With the cueball close to object ball, play at least 10 tough shots from the jacked position. Cueball frozen to rail, play at least 10 long shots. This is my least favorite, but most important drill, has saved my butt many times.

There are several more that I do if I've had difficulty with a certain type of shot, but the above are the usual fare. Never takes more than 1.5 hours.

I much prefer to match up against a really strong player over practicing alone, but I realize the benefits of both.

chas1022
06-15-2006, 09:31 AM
I practice what I feel my game needs the most first. I always practice exercises that will improve my stroke or maintain it. I have set days that I practice certain things etc. Sunday- banks,combos,carooms,cut shots, follow drill, stroke practice. Monday-stroke drills,shots misc.,saftys,kicks, Tuesday-stroke exercises,shots from Kinisters tape workout 1-15, follow drill,6 pointed star, practice break. Wedsday- stroke exercise,speed drills, tangent line, cicle, L-drill, banks,saftys ,Thursday - same as Sunday, Friday -practice stroke and play some 8 ball and 9 ball. Saturday practice shooting system and basics. It seems to work for me. Lately I have been doing the mighty x for my stroke and I have gotten good results.