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Bassn7
05-05-2006, 09:04 AM
The game is 8-ball -
All instructors,teachers and players . . . throw some ideas my way. I've got to solve my "no balls on the break issue". This weakness is killing me against stronger bar box opponents. I'm trying to be specific to body position rather than cue ball position. I believe the 3 adjustments are: stand a bit taller, bridge slightly longer and hold the cue an bit further back. Am I right? Help.

dr_dave
05-05-2006, 09:21 AM
Here are some other ideas:
<ul type="square"> move your weight more forward in the stance (onto the front foot)
thrust your body forward during the stroke
drop your elbow and lift your body during the stroke and put your shoulder to work
exaggerate the follow-through
work out at the gym regularly
practice, practice, practice (the break shot, that is)[/list]Dave

PS: None of the stuff will be that useful if hurts the consistency and/or accuracy of the squareness of hit on the 1-ball (that's the most important variable).

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bassn7:</font><hr> The game is 8-ball -
All instructors,teachers and players . . . throw some ideas my way. I've got to solve my "no balls on the break issue". This weakness is killing me against stronger bar box opponents. I'm trying to be specific to body position rather than cue ball position. I believe the 3 adjustments are: stand a bit taller, bridge slightly longer and hold the cue an bit further back. Am I right? Help. <hr /></blockquote>

Stretch
05-05-2006, 11:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bassn7:</font><hr> The game is 8-ball -
All instructors,teachers and players . . . throw some ideas my way. I've got to solve my "no balls on the break issue". This weakness is killing me against stronger bar box opponents. I'm trying to be specific to body position rather than cue ball position. I believe the 3 adjustments are: stand a bit taller, bridge slightly longer and hold the cue an bit further back. Am I right? Help. <hr /></blockquote>

Speeking as a player yes. Your on the right track to developeing a harder break. Don't forget to widen your stance. It all starts from the ground up.

So while your on the road to a controled explosion /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif i have some other suggestions. Start practicing at least 3 different breaks. ie. Down the middle, A diamond over, off the side rail. My rule is never come up empty from the same spot more than twice. Plus, if i'm not makeing anything, but my oponent is, I'll break from the spot he is. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

I usually start out with a "firm" controlled break. If the rack spreads out and a ball drops then i don't change a thing! If i come up empty, then the next time same spot but up the speed. If still nothing, then like i said earlier you need to set up somewhere else. St.

Cornerman
05-05-2006, 12:39 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bassn7:</font><hr> The game is 8-ball -
All instructors,teachers and players . . . throw some ideas my way. I've got to solve my "no balls on the break issue". <hr /></blockquote>

Here are posts and subsequent thread that should give you some ideas for a power break.

Fred's Power Break Observations (http://forums.azbilliards.com/showpost.php?p=300066&amp;postcount=8)

Nick Varner Clinic and Breaking (http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=26621)

But, that being said, if making a ball is what you want to do, I seem to make a ball much more often with the second ball break. And normally, the resulting break (on a bar box, mind you) is usually runable by someone with runout skill. Which means I fail to run out more often than not.

But, on the power break, when I really get a good one, I don't make a ball half the time and it's duck soup for my opponent, provided he has runout skill. But, a wide open power broken rack normally doesn't take as much skill to runout compared to a second-ball broken rack.

Fred

randyg
05-05-2006, 04:12 PM
Dr. Dave. The most important variable is the squareness of the hit on the cueball then the object ball.

Making a ball on the break 50% of the time is above average.

Most players break better than they think....randyg

PoolSharkAllen
05-05-2006, 07:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Stretch:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bassn7:</font><hr> i have some other suggestions. Start practicing at least 3 different breaks. ie. Down the middle, A diamond over, off the side rail. My rule is never come up empty from the same spot more than twice. Plus, if i'm not makeing anything, but my oponent is, I'll break from the spot he is. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

I usually start out with a "firm" controlled break. If the rack spreads out and a ball drops then i don't change a thing! If i come up empty, then the next time same spot but up the speed. If still nothing, then like i said earlier you need to set up somewhere else. St. <hr /></blockquote>

Also periodically check the tightness of the rack and ask for a re-rack if necessary. Some people just don't rack the balls very well.

ceebee
05-07-2006, 12:28 PM
I have obtained success in the break stroke, by positioning the stroke length midways to my body balance. Without balance you can not hit the ball accurate or hard. That's my 2 cents &amp; all you get for free....

CarolNYC
05-09-2006, 05:28 AM
Is this Keith?

Anyways, Tiffany Nelson has one of the strongest breaks I've seen-I think her website is tiffanynelson.com,not sure-you'd have to go into WPBA website-you may find some breaking tips on her site!
Take care!
Carol

Alfie
05-09-2006, 08:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ceebee:</font><hr> I have obtained success in the break stroke, by positioning the stroke length midways to my body balance. <hr /></blockquote>How do you figure where your body balance is?

TIA