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Billy_Bob
05-07-2006, 09:25 AM
OK, don't laugh at me please...

I was playing snooker yesterday (I'm a beginner at this) and left myself with an easy cut shot into the corner. Easy on a 7 ft. table that is!

But on the large snooker table, I could not shoot the cut shot from straight behind the cue ball like I would on a 7 ft. table. I had to lean over the side of the table and shoot it sideways.

And shooting this sideways, bent over, and all contorted, I could not "see" the shot. I could not see where to aim like I normally do on a 7 ft. table. So I was way off on my aiming.

I think I have learned to aim for shooting cut shots when looking at the shot straight back from the cue ball and looking down from a birds eye view. (I would need a ladder to see this shot from above!)

So how do snooker players aim for cut shots when shooting bent over? Or is the idea to not shoot shots like this? Or maybe try to leave yourself for shots where you don't need to bend over the table - say leave the cue ball further away from the ball and closer to the rail?

Tips, hints, suggestions?

yegon
05-07-2006, 10:29 AM
my question is how can the snooker players make any balls. I thought I play pool reasonably well but when I tried snooker last time on the 12" table with those tiny pockets I could not make two balls in a row.

I gues it all goes down to training for 8 hours a day for 10+ years and you see all the angles. They seem to be able to make balls standing on their heads, I do not think being bent over bothers them a bit.

theinel
05-07-2006, 12:59 PM
Billy_Bob,

The snooker players have several solutions to this. The first is that they know pretty well what areas of the table will cause this to happen and they try to avoid leaving the cue ball there if they think the shot will be awkward. The second is to actually climb half-way up onto the table with one leg (knee, foot, shoe and all). It helps to be tall for that one. The third is to use the bridge (they call it the "rest" or the "long tackle" for the extra long version). Due to the size of the table they become very adept at using the different varieties of rests available to them.

I'm really envying you right now. The last snooker table in my area was taken out over a year ago and I haven't played since.

cushioncrawler
05-07-2006, 11:08 PM
Further to theinel'z reply -- i can add a 4th attack -- most snooker player'z uze a 3-piece cue -- the 3rd piece iz a short extra butt that screwz into the main-butt -- this often allowz them to reech directly, ie without uzing the jigger, but if so they need to adopt a very long bridge.

5th attack -- I have seen "them" (i am not a snooker player) even uze their extendable-butt (this iz a 4th piece) to help reech, ie once again not uzing the jigger, ie uzing a super-long bridge.

6th attack -- regarding the short extra butt in the 4th attack -- some playerz do it a slightly different way -- they unscrew their main-butt, and then screw in a super-long butt -- but, after, they havta screw this off, and then screw the main-butt back on again -- this iz a pain in the butt to watch.

I have allwayz wondered -- what iz a USA snooker table like? -- are they full size (12' by 6')?? -- are they az low az a USA pool table??? -- are the ballz the Canadian 2-1/8" (or the english 2-1/16") -- are the pockets 3-1/2" (or the Canadian 3-?/8")-- are the cushion rubberz the english "inverted L" type (i suspect that theze are much faster than pool cushionz).

Which remindz me -- all snooker tablez are in fact marked and spotted for the play of English Billiardz, ie the 3 ball game -- if they were simply for snooker, they wouldnt have a baulk line. But i woz wondering, Billy Bob -- do u ever see English Billiardz played, ie on a 12' table, ie in the USA.

Billy_Bob
05-08-2006, 08:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cushioncrawler:</font><hr>...Which remindz me -- all snooker tablez are in fact marked and spotted for the play of English Billiardz, ie the 3 ball game -- if they were simply for snooker, they wouldnt have a baulk line. But i woz wondering, Billy Bob -- do u ever see English Billiardz played, ie on a 12' table, ie in the USA.<hr /></blockquote>

I don't have easy access to any snooker tables and have only played a few times, so I will leave the table specs to others.

So far as English billiards, I am the only one who even knows what this is in my area. I've only had one other person willing to play this with me on my 7 ft table and he only was willing to play twice. It is a lot of work to keep spotting the balls and keep score.

I think it is a fun game and good practice which will help to develop skills for other games.

bsmutz
05-08-2006, 09:50 AM
BB, What I do is use the ghost ball method to see where I need to hit the object ball, then aim the cue ball to hit that spot. If you can't see the angle from the hit spot on the cue ball to the object ball contact point, you pretty much have to guess using your acquired knowledge from shooting these shots in the past. Fortunately they don't come up very often. Using the rest will get you in the right place to view the shot from behind the cue.
Cushioncrawler, Most of the tables available for play at pool halls in the US are 5'x10'. Occasionally you will find a 12' table. We mainly use the 2 1/8" balls. The pockets are usually less than two balls wide. Usually the rails are undercut, so not the inverted "L". I've never seen anyone playing billiards on anything other than a billiards table with no pockets. Those are most often 12' tables.

wolfdancer
05-08-2006, 11:37 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I've never seen anyone playing billiards on anything other than a billiards table with no pockets. Those are most often 12' tables. <hr /></blockquote>
Say, you wouldn't want to make a small wager on that, would you?
Billiards is played on a 5 by 10.....and in the early 1900's that was the prevalent game. One room in Detroit had over 90 billiards tables.
As pool gained in popularity, they just converted the 5 by 10's to pool tables. Most of the "old timers" (now I is one)
when I first began playing, had learned the game on a 5 by 10.
I've play a little on the 6 by 12's.....don't think I could make a ball anymore on one. Maybe your "best guess" theory might work for me.

wolfdancer
05-08-2006, 12:01 PM
I've perfected the "in-off"....now if it would only count for something in 8 or 9 ball.
I hear that you played better, your second time on that 10 ft'r. I might need a spot from both you and Bill, if I ever get back there. (Got to get me a "TomTom" first)

theinel
05-08-2006, 01:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cushioncrawler:</font><hr>I have allwayz wondered -- what iz a USA snooker table like? -- are they full size (12' by 6')?? -- are they az low az a USA pool table??? -- are the ballz the Canadian 2-1/8" (or the english 2-1/16") -- are the pockets 3-1/2" (or the Canadian 3-?/8")-- are the cushion rubberz the english "inverted L" type (i suspect that theze are much faster than pool cushionz).<hr /></blockquote>
I have only seen around ten snooker tables here in public rooms and they were an even split of 12x6 and 10x5. The 12x6s were all the antique, handcrafted, stately, and beautiful type of full height whereas the 10x5s were all lower quality mass produced tables closer to pool table height with oddly rounded center pockets. The 12x6s had the L cushions and the 10x5s had the more standard pool cushions if I remember correctly.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cushioncrawler:</font><hr>Which remindz me -- all snooker tablez are in fact marked and spotted for the play of English Billiardz, ie the 3 ball game -- if they were simply for snooker, they wouldnt have a baulk line. But i woz wondering, Billy Bob -- do u ever see English Billiardz played, ie on a 12' table, ie in the USA.<hr /></blockquote>
I have never seen English Billiards played by anyone other than me. I have an English friend originally from London who loves and is quite good at snooker (capable of centuries) and even he wont play EB. He usually mentions the phrase "paint drying" when the subject comes up. The only game I see played frequently is "golf" which I find entertaining although my English friend considers it an affront.

All but one of the tables I have run into here were covered in pool cloth which never bothered me until I got to play on the one covered in West of England cloth which changed the game dramatically. The speed wasn't that big of a factor but the nap took some adjustment. Man how I love that bright green.

SpiderMan
05-08-2006, 01:50 PM
Here's an "unusual" technique I sometimes use when faced with a long-reach shot:

1. Get behind the shot, even though it will be from a distance.

2. Lay your cue stick on the table, and align it perfectly for how you need to stroke the shot (even though you can't reach it).

3. Keeping your hand on the stick (for the benefit of those who would call it a foul to remove your hand), walk around the table to the spot from which you will actually execute the shot. Be careful not to move the stick.

4. Using your bridge hand, carefully lift the tip end of the shaft to the proper "contact" height. Make sure you lift it straight up, so as not to disturb the left/right position.

5. Stroke the shot with your other hand (the one you kept on the cue butt while walking around the table) by "sliding" the butt on the cloth. You don't need to lift the butt.

You'd be surprised how well this works, with very little practice.

I've never seen anyone else do this, but it really does work.

SpiderMan

cushioncrawler
05-08-2006, 04:13 PM
Thanks Billy Bob (&amp; others) for the info -- my apologies for hijacking yor thread -- which remindz me, the record break in the USA for english billiardz iz about 2,500, by my hero Walter Lindrum -- i have had lessonz on Wally'z old table, at hiz home, off one of hiz best friendz (Wally died in 1960, i never saw him play).

Billy_Bob
05-09-2006, 06:58 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr>...I might need a spot from both you and Bill, if I ever get back there...<hr /></blockquote>

Well being as I am lucky to run two balls in a row on that large snooker table, how about 1 point on the wire?

Actually I don't care who wins or loses. I'm having fun trying out something new. I'm kind of playing myself at this point. Trying to pocket two balls in a row, then try for 3 in a row, etc. At this point I'm very happy if I can get 3 in a row!

I think I need to try leaving the cue ball near the rail, but this will mean more long shots and they are killer on that large table!

Alan Morris
05-18-2006, 10:49 AM
Hi there,

If you are able you ought to come down to the DoubleTree Hotel in San Jose in California this August to watch the IBSF World Snooker Team Championships.

We are expecting over 300 players from up to fifty nations taking part in what will be the first major international snooker event to take place in the United States.

http://www.sanjosesnooker2006.us/

Best wishes.

Alan Morris.
Executive Director,
The United States Snooker Association.

SnookerUSA.com - the Official Website of the United States Snooker Association.
http://www.snookerusa.com/