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pigbrain
05-09-2006, 01:04 AM
if i using a snooker cue to play nineball,what is the advantage and the disadvantage?

Bob_Jewett
05-09-2006, 10:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pigbrain:</font><hr> if i using a snooker cue to play nineball,what is the advantage and the disadvantage? <hr /></blockquote>
Some think the tip doesn't last as long, but there is a very good snooker player where I play who uses his snooker cue for all pool games (9 ball, straight pool, eight ball, one pocket) except for the smash breaks. Go ahead and try it. There is a big advantage in not changing cues, especially if you are used to a low-squirt cue.

RonMont
05-09-2006, 12:02 PM
I use a Schuler cue that has many shafts available for it.
I use the snooker (euro) shaft with a 12mm tip. This is a very stiff shaft and is very accurate.
I believe a stiff cue shaft is the best starting point to improving your consistency

sack316
05-09-2006, 12:31 PM
I had an older gentleman on one of my teams a few sessions ago that used a snooker cue. Let's say he was well past his prime, to put it nicely. But every once in a while when the old back and bones weren't bothering him so much that evening, he would shoot the lights out. I couldn't get used to the difference, but I watched him do some things with the cue ball that I wasn't sure was possible before that point.

Sack

Fran Crimi
05-09-2006, 03:08 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RonMont:</font><hr> I use a Schuler cue that has many shafts available for it.
I use the snooker (euro) shaft with a 12mm tip. This is a very stiff shaft and is very accurate.
I believe a stiff cue shaft is the best starting point to improving your consistency
<hr /></blockquote>

The Schuler European taper is used primarily for 3 Cushion play, not for snooker. I used one for 9 Ball for about a year. It was okay but I had to use mostly an open bridge because of the sharp taper. It was an interesting experiment, though.

Fran

Fran Crimi
05-09-2006, 03:14 PM
Advantage: You'll see more of the cue ball due to the smaller tip size and ball striking accuracy will improve.

Disadvantage: Power shots (on pool balls which are much heavier than snooker balls) are tough, particularly if the cue is an especially light one. Also 11MM tips do pop off with power shots.

RonMont
05-09-2006, 05:09 PM
As you probably know the snooker shaft is available as a US model and a UK version. I mant to reference the snooker UK model not the European. Sorry for the confusion.
Best, Ron.

Njhustler1
05-09-2006, 05:15 PM
i see a lot of people do that in my apa bar table league. i guess on a table that small, it doesnt make that big a difference but i sure wouldnt do it.

pigbrain
05-09-2006, 05:38 PM
thank you all!
do you think a snooker cue will get higher squirt, generally speaking?
my cue stick tip is 9mm. i play 8ball commonly.

9_Ball_Junky
05-09-2006, 09:44 PM
JMO, smaller tip= better ball control, but one must be careful to finesse every shot possible, due to the tip and shaft size. i play 8-ball, 9-ball and snooker, as well as golf, with a McDermott with a 10mm tip...i love it. never thought full table draws were accomplished so easily until i got that cue, and its probably 25 years old.

Fran Crimi
05-10-2006, 05:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RonMont:</font><hr> As you probably know the snooker shaft is available as a US model and a UK version. I mant to reference the snooker UK model not the European. Sorry for the confusion.
Best, Ron.
<hr /></blockquote>

No, actually I wasn't aware that they made a UK shaft. Isn't 12mm a little wide for snooker, though?

Fran

Snapshot9
05-10-2006, 09:55 AM
There are some factors you have to consider:

1) A smaller tip means that the range of the cue ball for
hitting it where you have to is 'tighter' or closer tolerances.
2) Miscues happen more often with smaller tips.
3) There is a distinct difference on the way you play shape
for snooker as opposed to Pool, and most snooker players find that out if they start playing Pool. Playing shape on a Snooker table is much more restrictive than a Pool table because of tight rounded pockets, smaller balls, etc..
Many people playing Pool with a Snooker cue find out that
their are drawbacks which really undermines their overall
performance, irregardless of how good they can pot balls.

When I won the Annual Seniors Tournament in Oklahoma City 3 years ago, there was a local Mexican gentleman playing in the tournament with a 7mm tip on his cue. He had been playing several years and always shot with this cue. Not only did the cue make an annoying 'pinging' sound when he struck the cue ball, but he had trouble controlling the cueball, getting too much english several times, and had several miscues.

I probably could use a racquetball racquet for tennis too, but I don't think it would allow me my best game.

RonMont
05-10-2006, 11:43 AM
I prefer a stiff cue shaft. I have tried several of the available shafts, the snooker shaft is the stiffest of them all.
I have always used a 12mm tip for all games (except snooker). The good people at Schuler Cues made me a snooker UK with a 12mm tip. After using for a few months I can say it is all I could hope for.
Its power in 9 Ball is dynamite! Its very low deflection makes it a pleasure in all games.

Qtec
05-11-2006, 12:45 AM
[ QUOTE ]
2) Miscues happen more often with smaller tips. <font color="blue"> When I first started playing pool, I tried playing with my snooker cue which I had been playing with for 15 years. I did have a lot of miscues on long draw shots[ 10mm tip] but the biggest problem was the wieght. </font color>
3) There is a distinct difference on the way you play shape
for snooker as opposed to Pool, and most snooker players find that out if they start playing Pool. <font color="blue"> Of course but that has nothing to do with the cue. </font color> Playing shape on a Snooker table is much more restrictive than a Pool table because of tight rounded pockets, smaller balls, etc.. <font color="blue"> You dont see players playing long shots with IE. </font color>
Many people playing Pool with a Snooker cue find out that
their are drawbacks which really undermines their overall
performance, irregardless of how good they can pot balls.

<hr /></blockquote>
I agree. Pool players use pool cues for a reason. Even Steve Davis uses a pool cue now. So do I.

Qtec

Stretch
05-11-2006, 07:04 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
2) Miscues happen more often with smaller tips. <font color="blue"> When I first started playing pool, I tried playing with my snooker cue which I had been playing with for 15 years. I did have a lot of miscues on long draw shots[ 10mm tip] but the biggest problem was the wieght. </font color>
3) There is a distinct difference on the way you play shape
for snooker as opposed to Pool, and most snooker players find that out if they start playing Pool. <font color="blue"> Of course but that has nothing to do with the cue. </font color> Playing shape on a Snooker table is much more restrictive than a Pool table because of tight rounded pockets, smaller balls, etc.. <font color="blue"> You dont see players playing long shots with IE. </font color>
Many people playing Pool with a Snooker cue find out that
their are drawbacks which really undermines their overall
performance, irregardless of how good they can pot balls.

<hr /></blockquote>
I agree. Pool players use pool cues for a reason. Even Steve Davis uses a pool cue now. So do I.

Qtec <hr /></blockquote>

Qtec, i believe Davis had a special hybrid cue custom made. It has a 12 mm tip and a 3/4 length shaft, staight taper and likely a few onces heaver than his snooker cue.

It looks just like a snooker cue......on steroids /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif St.

Bob_Jewett
05-11-2006, 04:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pigbrain:</font><hr> ... do you think a snooker cue will get higher squirt, generally speaking?
my cue stick tip is 9mm. i play 8ball commonly. <hr /></blockquote>
As long as you don't see the problems mentioned above, I wouldn't worry about it.

In general, a snooker cue has less squirt, and I believe it will have less squirt for a pool ball than a snooker ball (smaller squirt angle for the same quality of spin).

Big Dave
05-11-2006, 04:38 PM
Surely the main problem using a snooker cue to play nine ball is that you will need to cue very accurately on every single shot, because if you don't have very good technique you'll be putting unintentional side on a shot every now and again.

Many UK snooker players, (small balls and rounded pockets) and "English pool" players (even smaller balls and tiny rounded pockets) have made the transition to the fairly new "American" pool table (big balls and absolutely enormous pockets) and even though they are used to tips as small as 7mm, even the most devote small tip fanatics eventually change to a more appropriate sized tip.

Tony Drago is currently playing with an 11mm tip, a huge concession to the American game.

The larger tips are frankly the correct too for the job!

JMHO ICBW

All the best,
Big Dave.

Bob_Jewett
05-12-2006, 08:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Big Dave:</font><hr> Surely the main problem using a snooker cue to play nine ball is that you will need to cue very accurately on every single shot, because if you don't have very good technique you'll be putting unintentional side on a shot every now and again.
... <hr /></blockquote>
My belief is that the quality of spin depends on how far from the center you strike the ball. That is, the spin/speed ratio (RPMs/MPH or whatever units you like) depends on how many mm off-center the tip strikes the ball. If you strike 2mm off center, you will have twice as many RPMs for a given speed of shot as if you strike 1mm off center.

This means that a tip with a sharper rounding will cause slightly more spin than a flatter tip because the actual contact point of the more rounded tip is farther from the center of the cue ball for a given offset of the axis of the stick. I think Ron Shepard has a detailed analysis of this in his on-line pool physics paper.

So, I agree that a more rounded tip will cause slightly more spin for a given stick offset from the center of the cue ball, but it's not a large effect.

Other people argue that you can be a lot more accurate with your spin with a smaller tip. I don't think that's true, either.

Another point to consider is that carom players, who need to be very accurate with their spin, often use 12mm or smaller tips.

My belief is that players usually use what other players are using and don't spend much time experimenting.

supergreenman
05-12-2006, 01:35 PM
I wouldn't use a nail gun to finish cabnets, I wouldn't use a snooker cue to play pool with. There's a reason they're designed different. Snooker balls are smaller and therefore get less spin from a snooker cues smaller tip than a regular CB would get.
there's a fellow at that plays in the local weekly 9-ball tournament that uses a snooker cue. I wouldn't stand a chance against him on the snooker table but I regularly beat him playing 9 ball. He just doesn't have the control of the cueball.

James

Big Dave
05-15-2006, 04:38 PM
I meant to say: "The larger tips are frankly the correct tool for the job!"

Teadaemon
05-23-2006, 04:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pigbrain:</font><hr> if i using a snooker cue to play nineball,what is the advantage and the disadvantage? <hr /></blockquote>

I think the honest answer here would be 'it depends' - if you're used to using a Snooker cue then it may be that you can shoot a better game of Pool with it than with a Pool cue, but I don't think I'd choose to use a Snooker cue if I wasn't already very comfortable with it.

Personally I use a 57", 17oz Snooker cue with a 9.5mm tip for nearly all my shots - I come from an English Pool background, and my current cue is in fact heavier and longer than the one I learned to play with, though the tip is almost exactly the same size.

I'll admit that my choice of cue isn't ideal for all situations I might find myself in on a Pool table, but at least as far as my game is concerned, it gives me my best game for ~90% of the shots, and as soon as I can get the cash together I'm buying a decent break cue to use for power shots (rather than using a house cue as I do currently).

Bob_Jewett
05-25-2006, 11:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pigbrain:</font><hr> if i using a snooker cue to play nineball,what is the advantage and the disadvantage? <hr /></blockquote>
So I asked the snooker guy who also plays pool whether he had any particular trouble with his snooker tip due to the pool balls. I also measured his (brass) ferrule. He said he had no particular problem with his 9mm tip. He has the high run in the 14.1 league I play in with a 113 on a double-shimmed GC3.