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07-07-2002, 11:29 PM
i have a chance to buy a snooker table 5x10 good idea or bad i mainly play on 8 or 9 foot tables

PoolChick02
07-08-2002, 12:11 AM
Well, I have a 5x10 snooker table at my house. My dad says it is good to practice on this because the pockets are tighter(giving you less room for error and helps the chance to make balls easier on regular 8 or 9 footers, where the pockets are generally a bit wider). Also, the 5x10 is larger and this helps with long shots to pocket them easier on the other tables.

He always tells me, "If you can make them easily here on the 5x10,you can make them anywhere." So, I guess if you get used to playing on that larger table, you are going to feel more confident about playing on the 8 or 9 footers.

PoolChick02~Just my opinion. Hope I helped.

07-08-2002, 01:07 AM
Hi,
Bet your getting it a GREAT price?
Been there done that! That monster table will, if anything, destroy your confidence rather than build it. Guaranteed your friends won't be racing over your rec-room to be tortured by it's unforgiving pockets.
Your cue's shaft is probably a 13mm which will be about 2 mm too big to accurately hit that 2-1/8" cue ball. If you can find a good used Brunswick Gold Crown 1 or 2 with the standard 4-7/8" pocket openings you will have one of best playing pool tables made. If that table becomes too easy you can always add facings to the rubber to decrease the size of the mouth of the pocket.
Finally, if you ever have to sell the table at some point, God forbid, you'll probably get much more than you paid for it.
The only UPSIDE of getting that 10' snooker table is that you will be able to store lots of boxes on & under it.
But that's just me. lol

BLACKHEART
07-08-2002, 07:32 AM
I'm prejudiced, because I love snooker. I used to take a couple of my team members to a pool hall, to play snooker, for an hour before our league. Those pockets on the 8' bar boxes looked like bushel baskets. It also slows you down a little, because you know you can't bang 'em in. I think it's a great idea & I think everyone will want to play on your new table...JER

heater451
07-08-2002, 08:55 AM
A snooker table will force you to have better mechanics, in order to make your shots, which should translate well to any other sized table.

The pocket size may not be an issue, since snooker balls are smaller as well, but you should understand the mouths of the pockets are different. The cushions are not cut at an angle, like a regular pool table. The ends of the cushions are rounded, making average "rob the pocket" shots nearly impossible.

I had a chat with JayM once, however, and he informed me of how to shoot the rounded-mouthed pockets. I may not be remembering this exactly right, but as I recall, he said that rail shots should be hit with pocket-speed, in order for the ball to drop before it reaches the cushion. Any shot with a 'fuller' view of the pocket, should be shot hard enough, to compress the cushion, and allow the ball to pass without rattling out.

If you have the room for it, I think it's a great idea. You can always go out, if you want to play on a regular pool table. Unfortunately, you have to learn snooker, as well as teach it. And, you're gonna have to like it, because it can be VERY frustrating.

Good luck, with the decision.

07-08-2002, 11:04 PM
I say you should take this sooper deal!! Put Simonis 860 on the snooker table, and then play on it with the regular sized pool balls. This will do much much more to straighten out your mechanics than playing with the snooker balls. Practice a long, smooth stroke, all shots including table length draws.

I had the great fortune to have a 6X12 snooker table with Simonis 860 on it to practice on for a few months when I lived in WA state. It did more for my game than one could possibly imagine. As soon as I can afford a house to put it in, I am going to buy a 6X12 for myself and practice on it incessantly. Good luck if you purchase it!!

Pogue

07-09-2002, 12:48 AM
well, were about 50 - 50 here and all the people i talk to are about the same. he's got a set of full size balls. i went and shot on it again this afternoon, yes it slows you down, really makes you work on my worst long shots.i have the space.
what i have come up from everyone i talked to, it's the moving it, setting it up, and give yourself six months to two years to get rid of, seems even if you get rid of it cheep do to the size.

07-09-2002, 02:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: BLACKHEART:</font><hr> I'm prejudiced, because I love snooker. I used to take a couple of my team members to a pool hall, to play snooker, for an hour before our league. Those pockets on the 8' bar boxes looked like bushel baskets. It also slows you down a little, because you know you can't bang 'em in. I think it's a great idea &amp; I think everyone will want to play on your new table...JER <hr></blockquote>


well, here's my problem with the idea of training on super tight pockets whether they are thripple shimmed crowns or snooker tables with pool balls or whatever:

i think you are developing a very good half-game. you're loosing your ability to see and execute the bigger shots. you can cheat a fair (4 3/4") table enough to get several more shot options in a game. i remember reading that when alison came here she had to spend time learning how to cheat a pocket.

what is it i don't understand? my friends would come play me on my own "trick" table? they'd be crazy to do so. i just keep one that is the best at being dependable and fair. it's tight enough that it's a little bit more challenge but that's offset by the fresh rails, great cloth and true rolls. if it's been vacuumed; zero rolloff ever.

anyway, that's what i think.

dan

cheesemouse
07-09-2002, 06:12 AM
JUSTA-BRIDGE,


When I lived on the left coast years ago there was an 'open golf/payball' table on a 12 footer that I would play in during the afternoon hours and then hit the barboxes at night for some serious action. After six hours on the snooker talble and then going to the boxes it is like shooting at the north to pocket balls. The only pit fall I remember is I liked everything I saw on the barboxes for a while and my decision making could suffer because I would go for anything and pass on those lock up safties that were staring me in the face. One thing practicing on a snooker table diffinitely imprints in your mind is how much margin of error there is when pocketing on a pooltable. I'd buy the table if I had the room, hell, I might buy and store the thing as they are hard to come buy now days.

SPetty
07-09-2002, 11:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: houstondan:</font><hr> well, here's my problem with the idea of training on super tight pockets whether they are thripple shimmed crowns or snooker tables with pool balls or whatever:

i think you are developing a very good half-game. you're loosing your ability to see and execute the bigger shots. you can cheat a fair (4 3/4") table enough to get several more shot options in a game. i remember reading that when alison came here she had to spend time learning how to cheat a pocket. <hr></blockquote>Hi Dan,

You guys are probably just talking about different games. In order to fully appreciate cheating the pocket and learning to cheat the pocket, you must first be able to put the object ball where you want to put it. I think the small pocket practicers are practicing putting the object ball where they want it. When they learn to do that well, then they can fully appreciate your gaping 4 3/4" pockets and the positioning possibilities from cheating the pockets. The problem, as you're pointing out, is that after they've learned to put the object ball where they want on these small pocket tables, then if that's all they have to practice on, their game may stall because they have no pockets to cheat. But, as you put it, their half-game will be very good and if most of their play is on bar-like boxes, it may very well be sufficient. While watching some master level players in Vegas, one of them pointed out to the other one - "You don't have to worry about getting position - these are bar boxes!" (or something like that)