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View Full Version : Contact Point, OB ALWAYS



Sid_Vicious
05-16-2006, 09:45 AM
I'll admit I don't systematically look at the contact point the CB is going to make on the OB, especially when cutting and drawing. Question is, "Is it absolutely important to make the detailed point of contaco upon the OB ALWAYS the last focal point?, or is this possibly dependent on the shot at hand? One example is, the long draws. Right or wrong, I somehow adjust to seeing an incidental low point which correspondes to the mirror image of my stroke point on the CB. Sincere question...sid

Cueless Joey
05-16-2006, 10:00 AM
Sid, try it for one session. Look at the contact point on the ob. Line up and shoot.
Don't even THINK where the opposite side or c.p. is on the cueball. Just line up and pause on the last stroke and feel if you're going to hit that contact point or not.
You might be shocked what your instinct is capable off.

pooltchr
05-16-2006, 10:38 AM
Sid,
I never look at the contact point when I am down on a shot. Unless you have a straight in shot, the contact point is not the same as the aiming point. I try to focus on the aiming point when I am ready to pull the trigger on a shot.
Steve

mybreak
05-16-2006, 10:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> Sid,
I never look at the contact point when I am down on a shot. Unless you have a straight in shot, the contact point is not the same as the aiming point. I try to focus on the aiming point when I am ready to pull the trigger on a shot.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Now here's a post that EVERYBODY should be latched onto with a death grip and trying to learn how because it's where it's at. Unfortunately, it'll fall on deaf ears and either be misunderstood, disregarded, or unquestioned.

Stretch
05-16-2006, 11:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> Sid,
I never look at the contact point when I am down on a shot. Unless you have a straight in shot, the contact point is not the same as the aiming point. I try to focus on the aiming point when I am ready to pull the trigger on a shot.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Steve, what do you use for an aiming point on thin cuts? St.

pooltchr
05-16-2006, 11:28 AM
I will probably regret opening this topic up again, but I use the SAM aiming method that Randy teaches. It gives a specific aim point based on the degree of cut angle. Beyond a 30 degree cut, it does require a bit of visulation. It works for me.
Steve

bsmutz
05-16-2006, 12:10 PM
There are some shots where I am not looking at the CP on the OB last. One shot that I've found that is more consistent for me is when the cue ball is on the rail and I have a long path to the object ball. I've discovered that if I don't hit the cue ball in the center longitudinally, then it will swerve from my intended path. Since I'm not sure which side of center I will accidentally hit, it is very hard to compensate for, so once I feel I am on the correct shot line, I look at the cue ball last to make sure that I am hitting it in the middle.

RonMont
05-16-2006, 01:10 PM
Hi Sid, there are those that would say it dosen't matter. If you are groved in on the shot looking at ether ball would work in fact, closing the eyes should also work. I have to admit I never try that. I do look at the cue ball last when shooting over balls or other cases when my stance/stroke is not normal.
By the way I use an aiming spot (1 1\8" behind the OB)rather than the contact point. If I can see the line through the OB to the pocket then I can see the aiming point.
Best, Ron.

dr_dave
05-16-2006, 01:33 PM
For those who don't know what SAM is, it is described briefly in postings linked here (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/threads.html) under "aiming systems."

Dave
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> I will probably regret opening this topic up again, but I use the SAM aiming method that Randy teaches. It gives a specific aim point based on the degree of cut angle. Beyond a 30 degree cut, it does require a bit of visulation. It works for me.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

wolfdancer
05-16-2006, 01:44 PM
Dr. Dave, i checked out the link.....and was shocked to learn......that Dr. Dave aims different then the pros !!!!
The aiming article though recalled for me, how a very good older player that I know aims.....a little different then any other systems that I've seen mentioned....
He mentally brings the pocket up next to the O.B, then aims to put the O.B. in that imaginary pocket.....and rarely misses......
And if I remember correctly......Scott Lee's mentor Jack White....used the mental picture of RR tracks to visualise the path of the O.B.

Scott doesn't teach that, but maybe he missed the train....lol

dr_dave
05-16-2006, 02:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> Dr. Dave, i checked out the link.....and was shocked to learn......that Dr. Dave aims different then the pros !!!!<hr /></blockquote>
I'm not so sure about that. I bet some pros might have similar thought processes or intuition; although they might not always be able to (or want to) describe it. I think there's a lot to be said about just "seeing the angle." Now, what I didn't describe in the basic message is how aiming adjustments are made for throw compensation or throw avoidance, and swerve and squirt compensation. These topics are covered pretty well under "throw," "English," and "squirt" here (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/threads.html).

Regards,
Dave

heater451
05-16-2006, 06:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr>. . .Unless you have a straight in shot, the contact point is not the same as the aiming point. I try to focus on the aiming point when I am ready to pull the trigger on a shot.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>Hey Steve--I would agree, if you are aiming with the center of the cue ball.

I would also agree, if you are aiming with the edge of the cue ball.

I disagree, if you are using the 'equal-distance' aiming method, or something similar.

For example, using the old, half-ball hit:

Aiming with the cue ball center, the aim point is at the side/equator of the object ball, while the contact point is at about 30-degrees from the "South" point of the object ball equator, when looking down on the ball (North facing away from the player).

Aiming with the determined point on the cue ball, which is arrived at via the 'equal-distance' method, one sends that point to the contact point on the object ball. In this case, the aim point and contact point are the same.

To sum, it might be considered that the aim path of the cue ball is always different from the contact point, but not necessarily the aim point.

What I personally do, is imagine making the outside edge of the cue ball hit the contact point. This probably equates to the 'equal-distance' divisions, but I don't picture them that way when I'm down on a shot. This is similar to how one "feels" where to hit the pins when bowling a curveball, or when shooting a basket off of the backboard--because the entry paths are not straight lines, but arcs.

BTW, at the risk of [isomeone[/i] jumping me about "feel", I also don't really aim all my bank shots--mostly cut-bank shots, for a "straight" bank, I either go with what "looks good" or use the mirror system.



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Cornerman
05-17-2006, 11:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> Question is, "Is it absolutely important to make the detailed point of contaco upon the OB ALWAYS the last focal point?, <hr /></blockquote>

Hmmm.... interesting distinction. If a person does the "object ball last" thing, do they look at the object ball, the contact point, or the center of the ghost ball last?

Fred