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View Full Version : Dislocated thumb-grip hand



07-09-2002, 07:42 AM
I dislocated my thumb about 7 months ago and baby just won't heal right. I've rested and all the good stuff, but every time I swing that cue on a powerful shot, she dislocates again. If you guys are like me. I can't miss a day shooting. I believe in 3 years I've missed like 12 days. This year I've missed 3 months. Anybody have any suggestionas on a grip that removes the thumb from the cue without sacraficing control. A picture would be lovely. Would love some feedback from Cass and Lee as well.

Rod
07-09-2002, 04:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Desperate:</font><hr> I dislocated my thumb about 7 months ago and baby just won't heal right. I've rested and all the good stuff, but every time I swing that cue on a powerful shot, she dislocates again. If you guys are like me. I can't miss a day shooting. I believe in 3 years I've missed like 12 days. This year I've missed 3 months. Anybody have any suggestionas on a grip that removes the thumb from the cue without sacraficing control. A picture would be lovely. Would love some feedback from Cass and Lee as well. <hr></blockquote>

Desperate, use your two middle fingers, that will take the index finger and thumb out of the picture. I know a couple of guys that play this way by choice. I have tried it and it does take some getting use to but it works pretty good.

Chris Cass
07-10-2002, 12:38 AM
Hi D,

You've got me stuck for words. Why would you want my two cents? For what it's worth I'll give it to ya. Scott is on vacation again. Something about driving. He enjoys doing it. hahah No doubt he knows where, the best Hotdog stand, the best Carwash, the best Tacos, the best Chinese food, The best Pizza place, is all over the counrty. That's what I'd be asking him. LOL

Rod, nailed it on the head. The thumb and the index along with the pinky finger can basically hang. Although, I would try to curl them lightly around the cue. Just in case, God forbid, you smack them on the table. ouch!

This grip, you'll find is quite good. I often give this advice to someone, that's not cueing straight. The thumb and index fingers often turn, as the cue is at the end of the stroke. Something like turning a door knob.

I gather from your post it's power shots that cause the thumb to hurt and possible dislocate. This concerns me. I'm questioning the problems your having on power shots. First let me say, power breaks or power draw shots aren't as hard as they appear to be. I'm not trying in the least, to question your knowledge at all. Just talking from my experiences with them.

While I'm using Power draws and even my Power break, my grip hand is loose till point of contact at the cb, or 90 degrees. That's when, my grip starts tightening and my wrist locks at the forward position and through the stroke. While maintaining the same grip pressure till then.

I think after you get comfortable with the middle finger and ring finger as you grip. You'll be ok. Your thumb might always be weak but your power shots won't. Neither will your game. By the way, That's how I, grip the cue too.

I do appreciate the flattering gesture, however there are quite a few Qualified BCA instructors here on the CCB that, could also answer your question. This is what they do for a living. They may have some better advice?

Regards,

C.C.~~Rod, said it right. often people think fist, when they think of power. in pool, it's the amount of follow though and speed. IMHO

Rod
07-10-2002, 01:28 AM
Quote CC,
I think after you get comfortable with the middle finger and ring finger as you grip. You'll be ok. Your thumb might always be weak but your power shots won't. Neither will your game. By the way, That's how I, grip the cue too.

Hi Chris,
So you use that grip, like you say it is effective. I've expiermented with that grip, sometimes with my middle finger and index finger but with a little more pressure on the middle finger. When I use the middle and ring finger I feel like the cue is going to go flying! I have to grip it a touch heavier. My grip is light anyway so I guess thats why I feel the need for a bit more pressure.
Right again on the training aid, it will help one get rid of any steering or door knob routine. Personally I use the choke the chicken method. lol /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif Haven't killed the chicken yet though.

07-10-2002, 05:12 AM
i'm no instructor and i haven't seen you shoot, but maybe you should use this problem to your advantage and work with what you CAN do. you might surprise yourself. you have an opportunity now to view your game from a different perspective.

07-10-2002, 10:28 AM
Well just like you and Rod suggested, I'm using the middle and ring. I shoot pretty well. Short range, I'm probably 5% off or so. However, those shots on the long rail that reguire bottom outside english to get back down table, they suffer. I beleive because of the nature of the shot
(Which demands a good stroke) and my unfamiliarity with grip the fluidity of my stroke is off. But just knowing that other people use it intentionally is enough to drive me to perfect it. The most important thing is, I feel no pain. I feel no pain. I feel no pain. Thank you.

07-11-2002, 10:15 AM
You didn't mention which joint on your thumb you've dislocated. Have you tried securing it with tape. Kinda like how basketball players have their ankles secured to prevent ankle sprains. You might want to ask a Physical Therapist the proper way to do this.

JohnnyP
07-11-2002, 10:23 AM
Good time to learn to shoot wrong handed.

griffith_d
07-11-2002, 11:26 AM
Just cradle it in your other fingers. It will be loose, but it will be something.

Griff

TonyM
07-12-2002, 01:33 PM
You might try and emulate Jeremy Jones. He has the thumb pointing straight down and lightly touching the side of the cue (or the tip of the index finger) during his warm-up strokes. Then, on the last stroke, he lets the thumb come off the cue so that it is free and in the air for the hit. This eliminates any tendancy to "squeeze" the cue or twist it (and so on) when using any sort of power. The cue is not "thrown" at the ball (the idea is not to let the cue slide through your hand before the hit) but rather the rear hand is completely "relaxed" at the moment of impact.

This should take all pressure off-of your wonky thumb.

It seems accurate enough for Jeremy, so you might want to give it a try.

Tony