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View Full Version : "Thinking" about your stroke while shooting?



Billy_Bob
06-02-2006, 01:46 PM
[FYI - I started shooting again with my right hand yesterday and everything seems fine except I am out of practice...]

I have some things to change in my stroke. I was told I have to do this by myself.

I've put up mirrors in my pool room so I can see what I am doing.

The thing is, I am thinking about where my arm is and my stroke, so this tends to mess up my position playing and speed control.

It's like I can "just shoot" as I normally would and get good position on my next shot.

-or-

I can work on having a perfect stroke and then can't leave good position.

I assume it is best for the long run to work on my stroke, but I have team tournaments coming up, so what is best?

Work on stroke at home, then shoot without "thinking" at tournaments? Or try to play using the proper stroke at tournaments as well?

pooltchr
06-02-2006, 02:53 PM
If you practice your stroke properly (forget about making balls, just practice the stroke) it will eventually become a natural part of your game. There is a huge difference between the way you should practice and the way you should play. Thinking about your stroke is something you do in practice. Thinking about the shot in front of you is what you do when you are in a match.
If you confuse the two, you will find your game suffering.
Steve

bsmutz
06-02-2006, 03:31 PM
I agree with Steve for the most part. I have had some luck while shooting in league thinking about my stroke before getting down on the shot. Once you're down, it should be all about the aim and the shot. Mostly I try to slow down my pace when I'm not practicing. I spend more time looking at the shot (good time to chalk up), make sure I approach the shot on the right line, get a nice, smooth stroke going during warm-ups, then pause and stroke when I'm ready. Clearing your mind to concentrate on the shot may help as well. I know you don't put much pressure on yourself which is good. Staying relaxed is preferable. I wouldn't worry about your stroke right now until the tournaments you mentioned are over. At least, don't try to make any major changes as you probably won't have time to make them a subconscious part of your game on such short notice.

yaffabernstein
06-03-2006, 07:22 PM
i JUST took a full day lesson, 8 hrs from a top instructor and he told me not to think, to play with a empty head, just be one with the shot and see it, feel it, do it. It is so simple it actually works.

Cueless Joey
06-03-2006, 07:25 PM
The Monk?
I say, look at the shot.
Decide how hard you are going to strike the cb and what kind of stroke. Then do it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Qtec
06-03-2006, 08:04 PM
[ QUOTE ]
8 hrs <hr /></blockquote> <font color="blue">?????????????????????????????? </font color>

Q

Billy_Bob
06-04-2006, 10:37 AM
Actually I think stroke is one of those "1% inspiration and 99% perspiration" things...

It only takes 15 minutes for an expert to look at my stroke and tell me what I need to work on, then who knows how long for me to fix it - maybe a year or more?

Scott Lee
06-04-2006, 11:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cueless Joey:</font><hr> The Monk?<hr /></blockquote>

Joey...Nope, somebody local to her. The Monk is living in New Zealand.

Scott

wolfdancer
06-04-2006, 02:54 PM
[ QUOTE ]
The Monk is living in New Zealand. <hr /></blockquote>
you mean we're now outsourcing our pool instructors???
I was sure he'd end up in a ashram in Tibet
Say, this here thinking and shooting...do you teach this multi-tasking?

pooltchr
06-04-2006, 03:14 PM
Scott,
You are correct that Tim's home is in NZ, but he is over here for a few months at present. Seems like he told me he was going to be in Chicago in the near future.
Steve

Qtec
06-04-2006, 08:27 PM
An 8 hour lesson is still only 1 lesson.

Q

Qtec
06-04-2006, 08:56 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> If you practice your stroke properly (forget about making balls, just practice the stroke) it will eventually become a natural part of your game. There is a huge difference between the way you should practice and the way you should play. Thinking about your stroke is something you do in practice. Thinking about the shot in front of you is what you do when you are in a match.
If you confuse the two, you will find your game suffering.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Great post S, I totally agree.
Tonight in the pool club a guy who had earlier played in a 14/1 tourny and couldn't make 5 balls in a row, made a 47 break after 20 minutes of playing another guy. He says, "Q /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif, why can't I do that in a tourny?"
Of course, being a naturally sarcastic cruel ba#$%^d /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I said, "because you suck!" /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gifLOL
His problem is the same as many other players [who are self taught] who experience performance problems when it counts. They are not trained. They dont know the difference between practice and play so they have no method.
When they 'practice', they are as free as a bird. In a match, thats when they start thinking!!!!!- with the inevitable consequences.

Qtec .......guys like him would rather suffer years of torture on a pool table rather than take a lesson.......go figure.

DickLeonard
06-06-2006, 05:21 AM
Qtec I would have to say that 99% of my misses are caused by my mind giving instructions to my body.####

DickLeonard
06-06-2006, 05:29 AM
Dickleonard can't you get a divorice from your mind. It is almost like a nagging wife always blabbing, always telling your body what to do and your body is always resisting by missing.

I just saved myself $100 dollars now I don't have to go to the POOL Therapist.####

woody_968
06-06-2006, 07:26 AM
IMO one of the best ways to practice stroke (especially when you just start the rebuilding stage) is to not pocket balls. What I mean is just shoot the cueball (use objectballs so you have more than one ball to shoot). This way your not worried about results and can really concentrate on the proccess. Start with them on the spot so you can check your finish position over the spot when the shot is over.

If your working on the right things it wont take a year to ingrain a good stroke, in fact I think you may be surprised just how fast a good stroke can be learned.

Woody

RonMont
06-11-2006, 06:18 PM
I hope you offered him a empty wallet. Thinking is good until you are ready to pull the trigger, then clear your head of thoughts and focus on the shot.

BurloakB
06-15-2006, 03:48 AM
I did a complete overhaul on my stroke a ways back and had to constantly remind myself to do this and do that, really took me out of my game for a while. It's the old two steps forward, one step back... only it's more applicable as one step back, two steps forward.

If you work on your stroke in practice only to revert back to your old ways in match, not only will your old ways seem strange, you'll be unlearning all your hard work. Whatever you work at, you have to commit to, for good or bad, otherwise you'll be in complete upheaval.

You have to realize you're going to suck all around for a while before you improve. If it means you're going to blow a match, just understand that you're only sacrificing a match or two to win ten more down the road. Seems like nothing if you look at it like that.

When swapping one way of doing something for another, just make sure you come out with the best way of doing it.