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07-10-2002, 08:26 PM
Much of what I am reading on this web site and even the pool magazines seem to focus on the mechanics of the game and strategy with the idea of making a person a better pool player. A good idea since we all want to be the best we can be.

However, I believe to much emphasis is put in the stance, the stroke, how to make cut shots, etc. If a person has been playing pool for ten years or more then that person is probably as good as he will ever be, only marginally better at best. By this amount of time the person knows how to play the game, understands which shots to take and what the balls are going to do after contact. But, yet the person is still an amatuer and not a pro. Why!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Because after a person reaches a certain skill level the game becomes less about fundamentals and mechanics and more about mental toughness and handleing stress and being calm and relaxed at the table.

Be honest with youself and the rest of us! How many times in your life have you been playing or practicing by yourself or with a close friend and feel like you were playing well enough to beat Earl Stricland. By this I mean you are at the table and you are totally relaxed and confident. You are making every shot! You can break and run at will! You look at table with the balls clustered up and you say no problem and proceed to run the balls out. It is at those time you feel that you beat anyone.

So why can't you play like that every time you play??? Is it because the next time you play you are now holding the cue differently or using a differnt stroke? No No No!!!
It is all in your head. With your capacity to handle stress and be relaxed and to concetrate.

Case in point. You are at your local pool hall playing like a champ and a person ask you if you want to play cheap. Maybe even a person with less ability than you. You agree to play. All of a sudden you feel a little nervous. Once you get to the table you can't make a ball. You can't get shape. This person with less ability is beating you. What happened? Ten minutes ago you were the champ.

My point is we should be trying to understand the mental part of the game so that we dont't buckle under pressure.

Regards, Kelly

Scott Lee
07-10-2002, 08:56 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Kelly:</font><hr> Much of what I am reading on this web site and even the pool magazines seem to focus on the mechanics of the game and strategy with the idea of making a person a better pool player. A good idea since we all want to be the best we can be.

However, I believe to much emphasis is put in the stance, the stroke, how to make cut shots, etc. If a person has been playing pool for ten years or more then that person is probably as good as he will ever be, only marginally better at best. By this amount of time the person knows how to play the game, understands which shots to take and what the balls are going to do after contact. But, yet the person is still an amatuer and not a pro. Why!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Because after a person reaches a certain skill level the game becomes less about fundamentals and mechanics and more about mental toughness and handleing stress and being calm and relaxed at the table.

Regards, Kelly <hr></blockquote>

Kelly...I disagree wholeheartedly! I have seen people who have played pool for 40 yrs., and still did not have a clue about what a stroke really was. If the person you describe had started out the right way, taking professional lessons, and assigning dedicated practice sessions, then I might be more inclined to agree with you...up to a point!

As an instructor, we focus on fundamental mechanics for EVERY student, regardless of ability...this means beginner to PRO! When a pro comes to a coach to solve a problem they seem to be having (i.e.: breaking, aiming, slump, etc.)...more often than not, some flaw in the mechanics of the stroke is responsible.

I would venture to say there are more players out there who have played ten years or more, that have nowhere near reached their potential...regardless of ability...than players who have peaked out, and will "never" improve more than miniscual amounts (I don't believe there is ANYONE who cannot improve with professional instruction).

The example you described about playing great by yourself one minute, and then folding under pressure of playing/gambling with someone else, was an accurate description of how many people may not have the "heart" for competition and/or gambling. That doesn't mean they cannot achieve a high degree of skill. Playing pool for money is not a requirement, imo, to becoming an expert pool player.
A smooth stroke and good hand/eye coordination are!

Scott Lee

07-10-2002, 10:10 PM
Scott, I agree with most everything you said. But you seem to be missing the accute point I am making of the mental challenge of the game. What about the nerves and the built up pressure to perform when it is cruch time. More often than not pool is played with other people. Leagues, tournaments, friends, gambling, whatever. You must perform in front of other people! Even if you start off with professional lessons and learn how to do things the right way, all of that is out the window if you can not perform when it is time to play. Yes we can still practice the basics but to go to higher levels of play the mental challenge must be met. If it was all about mechanics I think we would all be pros. I think to be a pro one must have an inherent ability to play the game, learn the basics
and have the ability to conquer the nerves.

Kelly

cheesemouse
07-10-2002, 10:27 PM
Kelly,
Your point is well taken but if your fundamentally sound in your physical game, with repeated exposure to competitive situations will evenually calm your nerves. Being calm under pressure is an acquired skill. If your not fundamentally sound but calm under pressure you still lose.

Scott Lee
07-10-2002, 10:53 PM
Excellent point Cheese! Like you said performing well under pressure cannot be taught...it can only be "learned"
under repeated exposure in tournament play and/or gambling.
IMO, you either HAVE the ability to learn to be calm, or you don't. Many players, even after years of repeated
"combat" exposure, whether playing in tournaments, or playing for money, they still never are able to get over being nervous...and frequently lose out because of it.
Physical skill (solid fundamentals) will lend itself to alleviating anxiety to some degree just so far. That is the part of the mental game that is so elusive. Can you come with the big shot, in the face of the big dog... without choking? This is, I think, what Kelly is talking about.

Scott

Scott Lee

07-10-2002, 11:59 PM
I've started a few threads about this in the past. I believe there is a MAJOR factor in pool that is often overlooked. It is knowledge.

We hear talk of the mental game, and we hear talk of fundamentals. Both, in fact, were mentioned in this thread.

More important than both, in my opinion, is a clear understanding of the game. We've all seen examples of players with incredible strokes, who really never progress past the C+/B level. They can make any shot, but can't seem to get out too often. And the mental game, while important, is not HUGE. I can name many top players who qualify as lunatics at the table, but, boy, they still play well.

But knowing the right way - the best way - to get out, well, that's big. And sadly, it's underrated. I've heard so many people lament that they "know what to do, but just can't do it". I just don't agree with it. Most players quite often simply don't know what the right shot is, and never take the time to learn. In my opinion, these are the ones who never improve.

- Steve Lipsky

stickman
07-11-2002, 12:17 AM
Kelly, I certainly follow what you are saying. Fundamentals are learned and then practiced until they become routine. Pressure can become routine with repeated exposure, but I believe there are tips, tricks or whatever you wish to call them that can be learned that will lead to better success under pressure conditions. I have often experienced times when I felt I could beat just about anyone, and I think that my mental condition played a key role in it. I know that there are certain players that I feel I have some sort of mental block about beating. It's not that I suddenly forgot how to stroke, how hard to shoot, or what draw, follow, or english to use. The mental part of my game is the part that I feel needs the most attention currently. If I could harness the mental attitude that sometimes I have flashes of, I would be pretty intimidating to most of the locals.

07-11-2002, 09:26 AM

stickman
07-11-2002, 10:19 AM
I'm not trying to imply that my mechanics or fundamentals are such that there is no room for improvement, (gee wouldn't that be great?), but they're good enough that when I'm in the right mental frame of mind, I can shoot very good. There are several books that attempt to teach methods of mental preparation. The Pleasures of Small Motions is one such book. I've had it ordered for weeks now and hope that it shows up soon.

heater451
07-11-2002, 10:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: whitewolf:</font><hr>One thing for sure, nothing is so black and white in pool, and that is what makes the game so interesting. <hr></blockquote>What about the 8 ball? (Sorry, just being facetious. . . .)

heater451
07-11-2002, 10:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Scott Lee:</font><hr> Excellent point Cheese! Like you said performing well under pressure cannot be taught...it can only be "learned"
under repeated exposure in tournament play and/or gambling.
IMO, you either HAVE the ability to learn to be calm, or you don't. Many players, even after years of repeated
"combat" exposure, whether playing in tournaments, or playing for money, they still never are able to get over being nervous...and frequently lose out because of it.
Physical skill (solid fundamentals) will lend itself to alleviating anxiety to some degree just so far. That is the part of the mental game that is so elusive. Can you come with the big shot, in the face of the big dog... without choking? This is, I think, what Kelly is talking about.

Scott Lee<hr></blockquote>I just wanted to add, that I think there is another option to being 'toughened' by competition.

The other way is a sort of ignorance. Instead of numbing oneself to the stress of competition, one can concentrate on playing the game on the table, and not react to the opponent/situation.

Now, this is one of those things that 50% of people will find easier, while the other 50% will find harder (and prefer the "get used to it" route). And, although I think the latter category is more understandable, I think the former option is the better. As a teammate of mine likes to say, "The guy winning the game, is the guy at the table."

Cueless Joey
07-11-2002, 11:13 AM
Why did the Sacramento Kings miss most of their free-throws against the Lakers in game 7? LOL
I like to go by Bruce Lee's words. "To have no style as a style. To have no limits as a limit." Now, I can only have a game without mental part as a mental part.
Your point is well-taken though. I know of a really good player who can't play a dime when he has money on the line. If he's getting staked, he plays better. I have a friend who easily loses cheap sets but beats players that should beat him when high dollar is on the line. I think it is part mental and part composure. A great example of this Efren and Earl in The Color of Money. Earl loses composure and loses the biggest match of all time.

griffith_d
07-11-2002, 11:22 AM
When I first learned and started getting good, I was just a banger. Hardly ever missed a shot that makeable, but really never learned the game and why things happened the way they do. My progress stopped as I stopped playing for a few years (5) and I really never knew the game.

Now I have got some education (Professional lessons, books, etc.) and have furthered my skills in positioning and planning, even though my shot ability has dropped in old age (48).

Now I have to get contacts to see, get my stroke better again (thru practice), and I should be even better.

I play in 9 ball tournaments weekly (have placed in the money in 3 out of the last 4) and practice alone on weekends.

This old dog can always learn new tricks and even find a bone now and then.

Griff

07-11-2002, 11:22 AM
I'm going to agree with this one. Here's why.
Since June, when I bought my family a table, my kids and I have been playing pool alot. While they have been making progress, they didn't really care much about learning the fundamentals. It didn't take them long to realize that they needed some kind of handicap in order to have a chance against me. We had tried many types of handicaps when my daughter suggested that I shoot with my eyes closed. I agreed and we began playing that way. At first I was getting into my stance, aiming, shutting my eyes, then pulling the trigger. That wasn't working out as well as she had expected so she insisted that my eyes be shut BEFORE my bridge hand touched the table. My kids were shocked and amazed that I was able to make shots that way. They asked me how I was able to do it. I told them that once you have a good stance and stroke and you know how to approach the table, all of the aiming and position processing is done before you ever get down to shoot. They've suddenly taken an intrest in fundamentals.

The reason I told that story is this. While I can make shots all day long with my eyes shut at home, I still miss shots during league or tournament play. The only explaination for my misses is that nerves are causing me to miss shots that I could literally make with my eyes shut.

07-11-2002, 11:51 AM
I totally agree with Steve on this point. While I've only been playing seriously for about 4 years, I am more than capable of running a few racks at a time. I know how to hit the balls, and know where to hit the cueball to get it to go where I want to go.. yadda yadda. Just like kelly says.. I know it all.. right?

NO NO NO.....

I spent one hour with Steve L, and realized that while I know how to do what I decide, I OFTEN decide the WRONG thing. I works some of the time, but there is a better decision about half the time. I just dont have enough knowledge to recognize it quickly enough to make the CORRECT and smart decision. Having this knowledge of table management and SAFER position routes will increase my runout capability extensively.

J--

SPetty
07-11-2002, 11:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Steve_Lipsky:</font><hr> I believe there is a MAJOR factor in pool that is often overlooked. It is knowledge.

But knowing the right way - the best way - to get out, well, that's big. ... Most players quite often simply don't know what the right shot is, and never take the time to learn. <hr></blockquote>Hi Steve,

It's not always about taking the time to learn. At least I recognize that I don't have the knowledge, but what I don't know is where to get the knowledge. I'd be pleased to take the time to learn.

How do I learn? By playing better players? They won't play with me because I'm no good. By watching accu-stats? Maybe that would help, but just a little. Local tournaments? Probably not - like you said, most of them don't have the knowledge...

Wally_in_Cincy
07-11-2002, 12:36 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: SPetty:</font><hr>

It's not always about taking the time to learn. At least I recognize that I don't have the knowledge, but what I don't know is where to get the knowledge. I'd be pleased to take the time to learn.

How do I learn? By playing better players? They won't play with me because I'm no good. By watching accu-stats? Maybe that would help, but just a little. Local tournaments? Probably not - like you said, most of them don't have the knowledge...
<hr></blockquote>


Howdy SPetty,

I know a lot of excellent players who will play me but I hate getting my brains beat out /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif

I hate to give you a trite answer but I think it comes with experience. I began to understand table management better after playing about 500 games.

You can also WATCH better players and pay close attention to where they strike the CB and how they manage the table.

JMHO, I'm sure Steve will have a better answer.

SPetty
07-11-2002, 12:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>I hate to give you a trite answer but I think it comes with experience. I began to understand table management better after playing about 500 games.<hr></blockquote>Hi Wally,

Steve's post led me to believe he's talking about experienced players. If all it took was experience, then all the older players who've played for years would have the knowledge Steve speaks of, and I think he's saying that many of those players don't have that knowledge.

Let's see - 500 games / 20 games per week = 25 weeks
Only six months! Oh wait, I've been playing at least that long... /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif

07-11-2002, 01:43 PM
Hi SPetty. Actually, you've already taken the most important step! That is, you need to admit that there are things you don't know. There are a number of weaker players in my room that I no longer play, and it's because they don't ask me questions. I'm not playing them for the challenge, so if I play them it's purely to help. If they're not willing to ask questions, there is no benefit to me at all in playing - so I don't do it anymore.

Whenever a top player comes into my room, I usually stop what I'm doing and watch. And when I play them, I ask questions frequently (though only after the set, or at least the rack). If I, with a high run of nearly 200, can admit that there's a ton of stuff I still need to learn, frankly it pisses me off when I see weak players that won't do the same.

In admitting that you want to learn, you are one step ahead of many. One thing you mentioned, which I highly recommend, is watching Accu-Stat tapes. You will learn a lot from them. And when better players come in to your room to play, by all means, stop what you're doing and watch them. Wally mentioned this too. This is especially valid when they are playing 9-ball. Since you know which ball they are playing position for, ask yourself how you would get there (which rails, what speed, which english, etc...), and then see how they do it. This constant "quizzing" is instrumental in learning the game properly.

But make no mistake about it: it's work, and it requires incredible discipline.

- Steve

Q-guy
07-11-2002, 01:54 PM
The complicated thing about pool is, You don't know, what you don't know. It is not one thing, but hundreds of things that by themselves may seem unimportant, but combined make you a better player. One day you may just begin getting your feet in the best position, or move around the table and come down on the shot perfect without needing an extra twist to get lined up. You get the feel of all the little nuances that make up the different strokes. I bet there are hundreds. All the pieces begin to fall into place. I used to see it in the poolroom all the time. A player would all of a sudden jump up in speed without any real explanation for it. It is the little unperceived things coming together. I believe a lot of this is learned almost subconsciously from being around good players. An area with good players seems to breed more good players. I know it is not much of an answer, but it is part of the answer. Don't be afraid to ask questions. It is quite a complement to have someone sincerely ask your advice. By all means watch good players. You will learn even if you don't realize you are. I am not a big one for suggesting someone play in a tournament where they are way out classed. I can't see much use paying $100.00 to play and lose 11 to 1. Your time would be better spent watching as much or the tournament as you can. Instructions will be very helpfull, but from what I have seen, good instructors can be hard to come by. Plenty of good players but not good teachers.

Scott Lee
07-11-2002, 02:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Steve_Lipsky:</font><hr>If I, with a high run of nearly 200, can admit that there's a ton of stuff I still need to learn, frankly it pisses me off when I see weak players that won't do the same. In admitting that you want to learn, you are one step ahead of many. But make no mistake about it: it's work, and it requires incredible discipline.

- Steve <hr></blockquote>

Steve...WOW! What a great post, and a terrific attitude! If more pros took this approach publicly...instead of the "I know it all; just ASK me!" attitude, perhaps mens pro pool could attract the corporate sponsors that ARE lurking out there! Keep up the good work!

Scott Lee

SPetty
07-11-2002, 02:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Steve_Lipsky:</font><hr>Actually, you've already taken the most important step! That is, you need to admit that there are things you don't know. <hr></blockquote>Okay, it may make me look weak, but I admit it - there are things I don't know. No, really. It's hard to believe, but there are things I don't know! /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

Thanks, Steve, for the response. There are times when I watch the professionals play 9-ball and am surprised or caught off guard by the way they played it. I would have played it differently. Those are the things, I think, that you're suggesting I need to be especially watchful for.

As for asking questions - won't that bug my opponent too much? Maybe that's why the people you play don't ask the questions - they're afraid of bugging you too much. Or maybe there's nothing to ask. I can often watch my league opponents and know the shot they're taking and how the cue ball will react. Just because they execute well doesn't mean I have questions about it. The only time I would think to ask questions is if they did some kind of shot that I didn't understand, and that just doesn't come up too often. It would be difficult, after the rack, to answer "Hey, why did you play the two in the side instead of in the corner?" And a lot of times, I can figure out the answer by watching the rest of the play. So is it possible that maybe you've taught your weaker players well enough that they're figuring stuff out for themselves?

In fact, just last night in league, I asked a guy after his match how he made a certain shot without double kissing. Anyone else would have double-kissed the shot. I watched carefully as he shot it, and there was no double-kiss. The cue ball was no more than an inch from the rail and he was shooting it into the rail, cutting the object ball that was right there near the rail. He used some special follow (you should have seen the cue ball reaction!), but as he made the shot, he raised the tip of his cue. You know, the way "they" always teach "us" not to do! So when he made contact with the cue ball, the cue tip went up and when the cue ball instantaneously rebounded, the cue tip was nowhere near it. It happened so quickly, however, that I didn't catch it. Cool, eh?

Anyway, thanks for the help.

SPetty
07-11-2002, 02:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Q-guy:</font><hr> The complicated thing about pool is, You don't know, what you don't know. <hr></blockquote>Boy, don't I know it! hahaha

Thanks Q-guy. All good information. Some of what you're talking about I call "table time". You can read all the books and watch all the videos and read all the news groups and forums, but all that knowledge ain't going nowhere without "table time", where you actually do it and actually see it. I guess what some people call "practice". /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

Rod
07-11-2002, 04:20 PM
Quote S Petty,
How do I learn? By playing better players? They won't play with me because I'm no good. By watching accu-stats? Maybe that would help, but just a little. Local tournaments? Probably not - like you said, most of them don't have the knowledge...

SPetty,
You didn't mean to say that third sentence. What you meant to say is, I lack experienced or don't play that well. Something to that effect. Everybody is good to a degree, it just depends on who their playing and the audience.

I think you answered your own question about where you get the knowledge. Through Instruction, instructional tapes or books and plenty of table time. Watching good players or pro players is limited to a degree in learning IMO. The reason I say this is you see what they do but may/don't have the knowledge to understand what just happened. If one lacks a basic understanding of the shot or the stroke/skill required, then trying to reproduce that shot is not likely to happen anytime soon. I'm sure your aware of this.

You said, I'm expecting a miracle. Reguarding a lesson from Scott. I didn't know Scott was a healer to that degree.lol
I would have asked him to drop in and cure me.
Seriously miracles do happen. It may not be a big miracle, but small one's are always welcome. There just the begining of the big picture. Good luck, now go to your room and practice!! /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

~~~ everyone is still learning and it never stops
I believe Harvey Pinick said, "Golf takes a life time", or a very similar quote.

Tom_In_Cincy
07-11-2002, 04:36 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr>My point is we should be trying to understand the mental part of the game so that we dont't buckle under pressure. <hr></blockquote>

I agree about learning about the mental part of the game.. BUT all your skills have to be available and be at a level of confidence, to make effective use of your Mental GAME.

Life is too short to learn all there is about Pool..

I am still learning (after 34 years of playing) and look forward to learning even more.... Books, Videos, Instructors and now the better players are more apt to share information than 30 years ago.

07-11-2002, 04:51 PM
QUOTE: ....I realized that while I know how to do what I decide, I OFTEN decide the WRONG thing. I works some of the time, but there is a better decision about half the time. I just dont have enough knowledge to recognize it quickly enough to make the CORRECT and smart decision. Having this knowledge of table management and SAFER position routes will increase my runout capability extensively.

Jason, that was so well said it makes me weak! I'm working on this very thing with a friend of mine. He plays respectably but his position play needs work. He genuinely wants to improve his game and is receptive to suggestion. As we've played, I've observed that most of his troubles stem from making the wrong choice (drawing for position instead of taking the natural follow position shot, etc.) Sure, sometimes his choices work out, but his success percentage would be a great deal higher if he selected the better shot.

I think it requires knowledge and COURAGE to improve one's game. A player can know that Shot A is better than Shot B, but he's less confident in his ability to execute Shot A, so he plays Shot B. This happens ALL the time for some folks.

You'd truly be amazed at the # of people who are presented with a better shot possibility and respond "no, I don't like shooting it that way". It takes commitment to get outside of one's comfort zone and shoot the higher percentage shot, and the reward for those that do is a mastery of that shot AND a better run-out percentage.

Scott Lee
07-11-2002, 09:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Rod:</font><hr>
Reguarding a lesson from Scott. I didn't know Scott was a healer to that degree.lol
I would have asked him to drop in and cure me.
/ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif <hr></blockquote>

Rod...You NEVER know! Come towards the LIGHT!!! Step into the LIGHT! LOL

Scott

cuechick
07-12-2002, 07:33 AM
This is an interesting thread. I believe all things are relevent. Like baking a cake you need all the right incrediants: good mechanincs, knowledge &amp; mental toughness.
I have learned in my short career that practice, observation and playing in every tournament and league I can, to gain experiance. Asking questions, and playing with the best players that will play with me also helps.
SPetty, you are better than you give yourself credit for. I hope you are not assuming better players won't play you, have you asked? Sometimes offering to pay the time will get you a game. There are a lot of knowledgable guys willing to share the wealth if you ask.
I also believe Accustats are an invaluable tool, there are few that have the actual pro comentate their own match. That is a great way to find out WHY they made the choices they did.
As far as the mental game, I am constantly in search of ways to improve this, I do think that expeirance is the biggest factor. Never having been a competitive athelete when I first got recruited in to bar league I was soooo NERVOUS I shook!
I think team competition is very helpful in learning how to compete. I later became the anchor of a very succsessful team...so it can be learned.
A tip from Mr. Lispky on another thread really helped me to keep my focus durring a match and I think helped me to win my first tri-state a few weeks ago. This after 3 years, and truely feeling like I was wasting my money!
I really reccomend entering anything you can, no matter your level, I have even played in un-handicapped opens, just to have the chance to play really good players.
As far as mechanics, this is a constant, pool is a skill that can always be improved, Recently I observed Karen Corr, after a surprising upset in the NJ State Championships. She was at a practice table, rentlessly working on the mistakes she had made until her next match was called.
If you think you know it all already, then your the one I hope to draw next /ccboard/images/icons/wink.gif!!

07-12-2002, 10:10 AM
Hey SPetty. You can ask your opponent before you begin if he minds you asking questions. If he does (which is rare), then just play and observe.

However, when I was referring to asking your opponent about various shots or position plays, I was mostly referring to your own shots.

For example, if you have a tough 5-ball to a 6-ball, and play a poor shot, at the end of the game ask your opponent if you played it in the most high-percentage way. Even if you make the ball and get position, but still feel as if it were a "touchy" shot, ask anyway. He may say, "Well, you got shape, but your margin of error with the shot you played was much smaller than if you played it like so."

And as for the players I play not asking questions, I promise it's not because they're afraid of bothering me. These are people who feel they already know everything, and if they don't get out, it's just because they're "playing bad". I watch them play the wrong shot, over and over, but I have gleamed from their attitude that they don't want any suggestions. Not because they don't want to get better, but because they feel they already know how to play.

- Steve

phil in sofla
07-12-2002, 02:10 PM
While I haven't read the rest of the thread yet, and I do appreciate the point of mental toughness, here's a contrasting view from Johnny Archer.

After a very hot streak in the '90s, Johnny A had been so-so in winning titles for a period of time, and then more recently, had become very competitive again in big events.

Talking to an interviewer, he explained the difference. He said that attributed his renaissance to working on drills. He said that in his youth, he never did drills, but that now, they were helping him play to his potential.

Now, Johnny A had probably all the mental toughness he needed, from his past top performances, or so one would think. What he was getting from drills was repetitions to fine tune various things, and they did seem to tune up his game something fierce.

07-12-2002, 04:18 PM
Can you or any others personal recommend some SPECIFIC
Accu-Stat videos as there are so many to pick from.

Thanks,
Jim (GoProclaim@aol.com)
www.geocities.com/pool4Christ (http://www.geocities.com/pool4Christ)

cuechick
07-12-2002, 05:03 PM
There is one from I believe the US Open a few years ago, a match with Johnny Archer, where he comentates after the fact. I am sorry I do not have more specifics (like who he plays?) I borrowed it and it was really good.
It (Archers comentary)should be listed in the description, also there is one with Allison playing Vivian in Arizona (one of the few with women they offer) and it is EXCELLENT. It is a lesson(by Allison)in perfect tecnique, also Gerda commentates and offers some very good tips and info.
My ultimate fav is the 2nd 1/2 of the 100,000.00 winner take in Hong Kong (May be called the Color of Money?) all Efren against Earl. That one is very, very entertaining.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-13-2002, 07:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> Can you or any others personal recommend some SPECIFIC
Accu-Stat videos as there are so many to pick from.
<hr></blockquote>

Depends on what game you like to play. For straight pool:

1. Jim Rempe vs. (I think)George SanSouci from the 2000 tourney(Rempe reviews the match on tape)

2. Ralf Soquet's semi-final match from the same tourney. He's so deep in the zone it's scary.

If you like 8-ball try Roger Griffis vs. Mika Immonen or anything with Efren Reyes.

Don't know about 9-ball.

07-13-2002, 02:22 PM
Everyone watcehed the BCA Open today, right? Mens and womens
semi-finals. They proved my point better than I could ever put into words especially the men. The young man had a chance to win but buckled under pressure. He did not lose because he did not excerise good fundamentals or because he
missed some difficult shots. That did contribute but it was his mental state of mind, the nerves , the pressure that caused him to lose! It was also eveident to some degree in Ropels the older guy as well.

Regards, Kelly

Mike H
07-15-2002, 01:42 PM
For 9-ball I like:

1. Rempe-Jimmy Wetch at the 95 US Open....some of the most solid 9-ball play I've seen.
2. Nick Varner-Dennis Hatch at the 2001 Open.
3. Nick Varner-Shawn Putnam at the 2001 Masters....Nick is damn near perfect for the set.

07-15-2002, 02:20 PM
maybe one more trip to the bar would knock some of that nervousness away. Oh... and if you are going up, get me one too.

07-15-2002, 09:44 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Steve_Lipsky:</font><hr> If I, with a high run of nearly 200, can admit that there's a ton of stuff I still need to learn, frankly it pisses me off when I see weak players that won't do the same.

But make no mistake about it: it's work, and it requires incredible discipline.<hr></blockquote>


Steve, I hate to get on you like this, but I'm really curious about this statement. Why does it piss you off that someone isn't willing to work as hard as you have at their game? I mean, are you implying that these folks you're playing with should hold themselves to your standards? Or, as I'm sure is far more likely to be the case, are you just upset that these folks will never reach their potential, which is much more generous a thought? I'm sorry, I just wanted to understand your thought processes here, as I'm a little fuzzy from lack of sleep and a fourteen hour drive. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

07-15-2002, 11:58 PM
Hi Lorri. When I see a weaker player who is upset that he's not improving, yet won't take the steps necessary to do it, I find that bizarre. It doesn't begin to piss me off, though, until he then blames his general play on a lack of talent. Or until he blames a loss solely on "playing poorly", when in fact there were probably a lot of things he did incorrectly - things that would've made it tough on Bustamante. These attitudes belittle the hard work that stronger players put in.

I don't know... maybe it's just the way I see it. But asking questions is so integral to improvement, and so easy to do, that it boggles my mind why many players don't do it.

- Steve