PDA

View Full Version : Farewell tour



wolfdancer
07-08-2006, 07:29 PM
After 61 years, the legendary "King and His Court" are calling
it quits after a final tour.
I got to see Eddie in his prime, several times....and kind of sad to see him in a wheel chair now....but still alive into his 80's...

http://www.kingandhiscourt.com/images/jacksonville/King,%20Queen%20and%20Julie_s%20daugther.jpg

dg-in-centralpa
07-09-2006, 08:09 AM
I also saw him back in the 70's and he was amazing. There was a female version as well. Did you ever see them?

DG

Deeman3
07-10-2006, 06:02 AM
I played against Eddy at the Cotton Carnaval Tournament in Memphis Tennessee in about 1975. It was my team's reward for winning the tournament. He was unbelievable. He would pitch from second base behind his back and strike everyone out. He only had three other players on his team but didn't need any more. The catcher would stay behind the plate but the other two would walk up into the stands and visit while he was pitching.

He was was a very nice guy but he "knew" he was the best that ever lived in fast pitch softball. I never even saw anyone close to his skill level.

Deeman
Yep, he struck me out every time.....

DickLeonard
07-10-2006, 06:26 AM
Deeman I saw the King in the mid 50s and he was impressive but I saw Ted Kagnowski from Conn play in a Softball Tournament in Watervliet around 1960 and in 4 nine inning games he struck out 102 batters. Ted was easily 6ft4 and 250lb of muscle. No illegal windups that the King employed and every pitch was 110 miles per hour.

When he threw his change up for strike three the batters would swing and miss and be three steps to the dugout before the catcher caught the ball.

I would have loved to seen Cisero Murphy pitch softball, he pitched for a team in Brooklyn, in his unassuming manor he told me he pitched but he wouldn't blow his own horn. Others have told me that he could pitch.####

wolfdancer
07-10-2006, 07:06 AM
Dee, that's a neat story, getting to bat against Eddie.
I've seen him play in a few different cities...and I remember that later on during the game, he would walk a guy on purpose. Then while pitching to the next batter, he would go into his windup,looking at home plate, but throw the ball behind his back to first base, and pick the guy off.
Can you imagine how strong his arm had to be to pitch so often?
During my service time, I played in a base league, and rumor was, we were going to get Jim Cheeseman, assigned to our boat. Jim played for ComSubLant, that entered a team into the national softball championships....I think the legendary teams around that time, men and womens's were sponsored by Raybestos (brake linings).
I went to a game to watch him play, and I think his strikeout count was in the 20's...and he also hit a couple of home runs.
He wasn't Eddie, but he wasn't bad. they wouldn't let him pitch in our league, but I did get to bat against him in practice.....and I ain't hit one of his pitches yet.
Eddie used to say that doctors were very interested in studying his arm....and I think the idea was, that when he died...
He's probably now outlived 'em all....
I hear you been striikng out, ever since......???

wolfdancer
07-10-2006, 07:16 AM
[ QUOTE ]
When he threw his change up for strike three the batters would swing and miss and be three steps to the dugout before the catcher caught the ball. <hr /></blockquote>
Dick, great line....!!!
It's a neat comparision when they rave about a 90mph fast ball in the majors.....and the top softball pitchers are all clocked over 100. It's the shorter distance though that accounts for that. When you watch the really good teams play, it's all 1/0 or 2/1 games.....but the infield play is great.
Is Cisero Murphy...the great pool player, I've read some stories about?
You saying that Eddie's figure 8.. plus, windup...ain't fair?

wolfdancer
07-10-2006, 07:20 AM
DG, never got to see the women's team, but after watching the recent NCAA tournament...and some of the unhittable woman pitcher's....not surprising they could come up with a Women's team.

Deeman3
07-10-2006, 07:35 AM
I hear you been striking out ever since.....?

<font color="blue"> Man, did you ever peg that one right! I think softball pitchers can pitch every day because the underhanded throw is a natural motion of the arm and puts very little stress on the elbow and shoulder. You are right, they can get up in the low hundreds very easily. Eddy Fainter was just a God endowed individual with the perfect arm but a lot of entertainer in him as well.

Dick, I think there have been many great pool players like Murphy who were great at other sports. If you have the coordination, drive and determination to play great pool, you can master other athletic activities as well. </font color>

Deeman

Stretch
07-10-2006, 01:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman3:</font><hr> I hear you been striking out ever since.....?

<font color="blue"> Man, did you ever peg that one right! I think softball pitchers can pitch every day because the underhanded throw is a natural motion of the arm and puts very little stress on the elbow and shoulder. You are right, they can get up in the low hundreds very easily. Eddy Fainter was just a God endowed individual with the perfect arm but a lot of entertainer in him as well.

Dick, I think there have been many great pool players like Murphy who were great at other sports. If you have the coordination, drive and determination to play great pool, you can master other athletic activities as well. </font color>

Deeman <hr /></blockquote>

Dee, so true. Many great Pool players are good because they are great compeditors. You usually find that they are also good at a lot of other things too like golf or baseball, or even the board games like chess or the cards.

Just a thought, if a pitcher can generate pitches of 100 plus miles an hour. I think it might be worth taking a look at breaking the balls like an underhanded pitch. Maybe that is why you see the long follow thoughs by some pro's. At first look it seems rather unneccesary but the force required to generate that kind of speed needs to be released gradually or it's just to hard on the body in the long run with the sudden stop. St.