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ryushen21
07-18-2006, 06:49 PM
I recently decided, after playing way too much golden tee, that I want to take up golf. I have no experience whatsoever with the game.

I was just wondering if I should go ahead and invest in a good set of clubs from the beginning, or is there such a thing as a beginner set? And if i should just go ahead and shell out the money, what is a good brand of clubs to get.

I realize how parallel this is to some of the cue discussions on the other side, but i am just really looking for some good honest advice.

moblsv
07-18-2006, 08:56 PM
The clubs really do make a difference. To start you will want a forgiving set of Irons, something cast, cavity back, oversized. A proshop can help you get into something that fits your needs. Terms like "forged", "blades", "workable", "soft" are for your next set of clubs when you get your handicap down in the teens

If you are on a budget I would recommend cheaper Irons and putting the money into the woods. A good Driver, Fairway Woods and Hybrids are pricey but you will get a lot out of them. The Hybrids are especially nice. I just bought my first hybrid to replace my three iron and love it. If you can afford it, get rid of the long irons and get Hybrids.

If somebody in your area sells "clone" or "knock off" irons, you can pick up an entire set for $200 - $300 that are actually quite good. I am a single digit handicap and only bought my first set of "real" irons (Titleist) a year ago. Beware of knock off woods though, I have not used a cheap wood yet that was worth putting in my bag.

Deeman3
07-19-2006, 05:44 AM
I would even consider borowing or renting some clubs to see what you like, forged or cast. I started with forged Titlest irons but nmow that my game is less accurate, I use Ping cast irons. I think the above advice is very soound but you might want to try out a few different clubs before you buy. You are a solid framed guy and what fits some may not fit you.

Some other advice, take a few lessons and "listen" to the teacher. He/she can save you much heartache and frustration.

Good luck, I'm sure you will do well, like you have in pool. Also, don't let a leftist woman emasculate you...Sid says it is not painful but I don't beleive him. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I know, but I had to throw that in...

Deeman

ryushen21
07-19-2006, 06:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman3:</font><hr> Also, don't let a leftist woman emasculate you...Sid says it is not painful but I don't beleive him. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I know, but I had to throw that in...

Deeman <hr /></blockquote>

You wouldn't be Deeman if you didn't.

ryushen21
07-19-2006, 06:58 AM
Thanks for the advice. I found a local course not too far from where i live that gives lessons and they also have their own shop and will let you try out different sets. So it sounds like that is a pretty solid idea to go with. And from there i can kind of get an idea for what i would want to buy.

I just didn't want to be that guy who shows up with a ridiculous set of a clubs but can't hit the ball worth a damn.

JPB
07-19-2006, 07:10 AM
First take some lessons. In golf you absolutely will hate if if you don't start with some fundamentals. It is hard enough as it is. I would talk to a pro and even think about getting fitted for irons relatively early. You might be able to get a set built that isn't too expensive. If you don't do that, I would get good quality, but inexpensive. Tommy Armour is a brand I see advertised on the internet that puts out a decent product for not too much money. I would also ask around to club repair guys. I have not done it, but I think you can bend around forged clubs. I would sooner get a set of used forged irons and then adjust the loft and lie than get a bad set of cast clubs. I dumped my forged blades I played with for years in favor of custom fit cast Pings and still don't know if I did the right thing or not. I have been thinking of pulling hte old blades out of the closet and seeing about some refurbishing. Unlike some others, I actually think it is OK to learn on a hard to hit club rather than a game improvement club. Odds are, however, you will want something a tad more forgiving. I would also go out and buy the book "In Search of the Perfect Golf Club" which will tell you a lot about the differences and what to look for down the road. To start with, however, get good enough quality but don't go nuts since you will probably replace it.

The one definite recommendation I will make now is to NOT get a face balanced center shaft putter. A face balanced putter is one that if you hold it horizontal to the ground at a balance point, the face will point to the sky. A regular club will have the toe of the clubhead pointing down. Don't get face balanced. Why? Because I will send you to get Stan Utley's book on putting. I am a recent convert to his method. I couldn't figure out why I was putting so bad. Well, I had myself screwed up with Dave Pelz theory and his equipment recommendations. (If you get into golf you will run across Dave Pelz writings, and his methood will be tempting to a pool player because he advocates a pool-like down the line putting method. Dangerous though because in golf you are to the side of the line and the club moves in an arc around you. It is illegal to putt w/ a pool cue;-)) I had no feel and was putting terrible. I read Utley's book, got out my old forged heel shafted putter, practiced on the rug at home for maybe 15 minutes, about 10 minutes at the course and had my best putting rounds in years. I putted well as a kid and wished I had Utley's book to keep me on track then, because it spells out what I think I did when I was good around the greens. I used to go a week without 3 putting, and with the pelz garbage I could hardly go 3 holes. immediately after getting utley's book I went over 36 holes without a 3 putt and was hitting a lot of quality putts. Save yourself some headaches and get that book. Putting is extremely important and many beginners forget about it. I would actually start on the green and work back, although most beginners start at the driving range then maybe putt as an afterthought. natural thing to do, but one reason why many beginners don't learn to play well.

Start with a pro in your area though, and get some lessons.

Also, you should remember that a lot of the newest technology will not help you. The big headed titanium drivers with lug nuts and super hot balls have been designed to work together to trick the USGA equipment limits. And they do for players with swing speeds over 120. For beginners, the advantages that are there for the very best players are not. You will hit it about the same distance with any reasonable driver. So focus more on what is a good fit for you and making sure you have decent grips. That will matter a lot more to a beginner than having the same thing a given pro his. In fact, what the pros do is make sure their equipment fits exactly what they are trying to do. Most could play with any brand if they tweak it to fit. If you start with that idea you will be ahead of most players who collect a lot of the latest clubs and then put them in bins and try something else.

wolfdancer
07-19-2006, 10:50 AM
I had good luck buying clones. My driver is a Big Bertha knockoff, my irons also Callaway copies. I also bought a 2-ball putter knockoff. I got mine from golfclubsforeless....but you can google dicounted golf clubs, and find many sites.
More important then the head....is the shaft flex (imho)

cushioncrawler
07-21-2006, 06:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ryushen21:</font><hr> I recently decided, after playing way too much golden tee, that I want to take up golf. I have no experience whatsoever with the game.

I was just wondering if I should go ahead and invest in a good set of clubs from the beginning, or is there such a thing as a beginner set? And if i should just go ahead and shell out the money, what is a good brand of clubs to get.

I realize how parallel this is to some of the cue discussions on the other side, but i am just really looking for some good honest advice. <hr /></blockquote>

A..... Dont -- too many stupid people rules clubs Clubs &amp; weather -- but here are my hints.....

B..... Find some super over-sized ironz -- but unfortunately u wont find any koz they havent been made for 20 yearz, even old uzed clubz are extinct i think -- next best thing, the biggest modern ironz that i myself have seen were one of the Daiwa??? seriez i think -- i myself uze(d) Rapier ironz, the Skion model were the biggest (but theze are possibly a bit smaller than the Daiwa), and probably not available in the US of A.

C..... If u buy some ironz, u will allmost certainly havta grind some extra bounce etc off (into) the toe -- 10 out of 10 beginnerz have a divot that iz too toe heavy.

D.... Buy some shankless ironz -- unfortunately i think that the last "shankless" woz made in about 1906?? even tho they are not illegal in the modern age. Uken be like Dean Martin and uze a set all make up of woodz (ie shankless), or, u can make some shankless ironz yourself if u want, like i did. U simply buy some 10mm (or better still 12mm) aluminium sheet -- cut out a big (oversized) bit in the desired shape -- drill a hole for the shaft -- glue in the shaft uzing 5minute araldite -- grind the desired bounce in the bottom -- and away u go -- no stupid looking face markingz are needed, a plain face will have all of the friktion that u will ever need.

E.... Get a half-set only, ie say 7 clubz -- and a small and light bag and buggy.

F.... Luckyly, the modern woodz are the good newz -- get the biggest cheapest Driver that u can -- but get a very short shaft (dont get a driver that givz max distance off the tee).

G.... Make your own putter, really big and really heavy -- my own putter woz so bignheavy that it would stay upright without falling over if i let go of it, even tho it had a long semi-broomstick handle -- actually, it might have been illegal koz in fact the truth iz that i uzed a cut-down "mop handle", it still had the nail-hole in it. One of my golf-mates made hiz own putter allso, and this woz definitely illegal, but i didnt have the heart to tell him, he dezigned and built the world record speed sail boat, perhaps this woz illegal allso. I remember him explaining to me why the trampoline effect worked (for driverz), he said that it worked koz the "e" for the steel face woz larger (perhaps 0.95) than the "e" for a golf ball (perhaps 0.81) -- simple when u think about it, ie take some of the strain from the ball and give it to the face -- no need for the bullshit that u kum across in golf magz. For my part, i advized him not to get too carryd away with trying to dezign a light-weight "boat" -- i said to concentrate on getting it az stiff az possible, like my putter (i have been on a sail-boat once only, and it developed a leak and sank, but i didnt tell him this).

H.... Swing like Jim Furyk. In my day, when i used to play, my hero'z (for style and swing) were Miller Barber, and Lee Trevino, and Isao Aoki. Nowadayz all of the pro'z have a college swing -- if Tiger Woodz had been taught to swing like Jim (Efren) Furyk he would be unbeatable.

onepocketfanatic
07-22-2006, 08:32 AM
Like some have said, take lessons and do the drills they give you and it will make a huge difference (plus a lot less frustration).
There was a company here in Houston that was "Las Vegas Discount" that would let you give them your credit card number, and take an entire set of clubs home for a week. They had about 20 different brands, so it was really a good way to find out what you liked the best.
I personally play with King Cobra knock offs with graphite shafts, and I could not see any difference in them, and the real Kig Cobras (I tested the Cobra's from the shop). Custom fitting was part of the deal (I required 1" longer than standard shafts). Make sure you are fitted for the clubs, as this produced longer and straghter shots in my game.