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mwaldrep
07-19-2006, 11:04 AM
Hey all, I'm new here. Long time player, just buying my first table. The table I learned on was an Anni. I was thinking about getting one of these, and billiardtablerestoration.com or something has one they will restore for around $8k. What do you all think of that price? Also, does anyone have info on a solid table dealer in the Detroit area?

One last thing, there's a custom table maker here (Wolverine) that I have talked to. The owner is cool, and he's been making and restoring tables for more than 20 years around here. If I go with a custom 9 footer from him, what are the chances I'll be able to get my $4500 out of it should I need to sell in a few years? Anyone know these tables? Any buyers going to recognize that name? I could see it taking a while to unload a table with a less-than-way-famous name, regardless of how well built it is.

Thanks for any help.

Pizza Bob
07-19-2006, 12:12 PM
I don't think I'd purchase a table for investment potential. New commercial grade tables depreciate about 50% (from MSRP) almost immediately, once they become "used".

That being said, if you want to have a chance of recovering money spent or perhaps having a ROI, then you're looking in the right direction with the Anniversary table. There is another thread on here that goes into great detail about the Anniversary tables and these could very well be an appreciating asset, dependent on initial purchase price and condition. The Anniversary's and Centennials were said to be some of the finest tables ever made. Good luck in your quest.

Adios,

Pizza Bob

mwaldrep
07-19-2006, 12:22 PM
yeah, I should be clear. I know I'm not going to make my money back on a new or custom table. So, to reduce my losses on owning a table, it looks like I'm better off going with a classic (like the Anni). If I can find one in OK shape for around $5k, I'll jump on it. The restoration guy said it would be like brand new, but I don't necessarily need it to be like that.

Keep the advice coming. Thanks in advance...

DickLeonard
07-21-2006, 05:46 AM
PizzaBob nice seeing your posting.

I will tell my used pooltable story, a friend called me he was going to buy a cheap tabe and I told him check the want ads for old pool tables. Within 2 weeks he called me he had bought an old table and could I help him move the table and set it up.
When it was in his house, I had him call Blatts in NYC and ask him if he had a Brunswick Pfister model and how much? They had the model, it would take a couple of months to restore and it would be 32,000.

I told him a nice investment for 1200.####

Pizza Bob
07-22-2006, 03:51 AM
Hey Dick, you know what they say, "Even a blind squirrel finds a nut occasionally." That's how I got my $10 Titlist cue conversion.

Adios,

Pizza Bob

logixrat
07-23-2006, 11:54 AM
I have a Golden West for sale, much cheaper than the prices you have here. If you are interested let me know. I started a thread w/ pictures and more details already.

Scott Lee
07-23-2006, 01:49 PM
No offense, but trying to compare your 8' Golden West table, to an antique Brunswick Pfister, is kind of like saying a Honda Civic is equal to a Mercedes SL600! No comparison, imo. Although your table probably plays fine, it is not compariable to a professional style table, and your original purchase price reflects that. Top quality tables start around $4K and go up from there. A current Brunswick Gold Crown IV runs $8k+.

Scott Lee

logixrat
07-23-2006, 03:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> No offense, but trying to compare your 8' Golden West table, to an antique Brunswick Pfister, is kind of like saying a Honda Civic is equal to a Mercedes SL600! No comparison, imo. Although your table probably plays fine, it is not compariable to a professional style table, and your original purchase price reflects that. Top quality tables start around $4K and go up from there. A current Brunswick Gold Crown IV runs $8k+.

Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>

I agree 100% and apologize if you or anyone else took offense to my post. I was just saying I had a cheaper alternative if one was desired. No way it is the same as the Brunswick.

mwaldrep
08-12-2006, 10:59 AM
Hey guys, just wanted to update you all that I picked up my Anniversary for $3000 in Lexington yesterday. Some ball marks on the rails, and some regular wear/tear, but overall its in really great shape. The guy had bought it 10 years ago from a co-worker for $1500, and when I showed up and started telling the guy what a seriously desireable table the Anni was, he was shocked. He based his price on a recent appraisal, which was $4500 (but maybe didn't read the actual appraisal or he might have understood what he had). Anyway, the castings are all beautiful. Still has the red pockets. 9' without the ball return.

Who else has one of these tables (or a cenntenial)???

Need to wait a few weeks to set it up. /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif And I think I need to put fresh bumpers on it.

Anyone know the actual weight of those slates? Holy balls. And we were two big strong guys moving them.

Where's a good place to find a variety of pool lights?

DickLeonard
08-12-2006, 05:42 PM
mwaldrep this is probably a little late but always carry the slates vertical you must have been carrying them horizontal. It's strange that the slate weighs the same but vertical one hand carrys and the other balances and there as light as a feather compared to carrying the slates horizontal.####

Scott Lee
08-13-2006, 01:24 AM
Dick...I sure agree with ya about carrying the slates upright being easier...but "light as a feather"? Geez, you musta been Superman in your earlier days! LOL Those slates weigh in at close to 300# each, and with two guys, it's STILL a struggle. Three, or even 4, makes it a lot easier!

Scott Lee

DickLeonard
08-13-2006, 04:25 AM
Scott I was 5ft7 and 123 lbs when I was doing this. I was nicknamed Mighty Mouse.####

Rich R.
08-13-2006, 05:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Dick...I sure agree with ya about carrying the slates upright being easier...but "light as a feather"? Geez, you musta been Superman in your earlier days! LOL Those slates weigh in at close to 300# each, and with two guys, it's STILL a struggle. Three, or even 4, makes it a lot easier! <hr /></blockquote>
Scott, I agree with you.
It has been many years, but I was involved in moving a table, for an exhibition, one time and we had to take those slates up a very narrow stairway. It damn near killed five of us. It was easier bringing them back down the steps. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Light as a feather? /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

mwaldrep
08-13-2006, 08:46 AM
Actually, we did move them vertically. I'm 200# and strong, the other guy was maybe 5'7" but strong like bull. We had to go up 6 stairs out of the basement, then 4 to get up to the driveway from the backyard. Heavy as hell. We're both young. Still heavy as hell. I had been told they were 200# each, but after moving it, I think 300# sounds more realistic. whoa. anyone know sure? I "wiki"-ed it but they didn't have much good info on brunswick, and nothing on the anni.

Anyone in the Detroit area?

Brian in VA
08-13-2006, 10:48 AM
Congratulations! I picked up an Anniversary off ebay a couple of months ago for $2000 and I'm waiting on my room to be finished before I set it up. Going to pick it up week after next.

I snagged a light off ebay too. There are literally 500 for sale at any time, all new. The one I got is a 7 foot bar light with 4 shades in brushed nickel for about $150 shipped. It's perfect to match the rest of the room and the decorator (my bride) was particular.

Have fun!
Brian in VA - will be wearing a back brace for the pickup!

Scott Lee
08-30-2006, 09:44 PM
Sorry good buddy, but that nickname was owned by another player...the CCB's old poster, Howie Pearl...given to him, when he was voted rookie player of the year by the PPPA in 1980!

Scott ~ believes Mighty Mouse was named by Mataya and Rempe

Paul_Mon
08-31-2006, 04:38 AM
Slate weighs 168 lbs per square foot. A typical 9 table (50 x 100 playing surface) has 3 slates that measure approximately 54 x 35. Assuming 1 thick slate each piece would weigh in at 183 lbs. not including the framing. Most of the older tables had 1 1/4" to 1 1/2" slates.

Paul Mon

DickLeonard
08-31-2006, 05:11 AM
Scott I'll yield to Howie Pearl and speaking of Howie I know he disappeared from the Board any word on him.####

DickLeonard
08-31-2006, 05:18 AM
Paul nice to see your posting, I did tackle a few of those 1 1/2 inch slates. You need three men and a boy to handle them, especially on a 5x10 table.####

Scott Lee
08-31-2006, 10:46 AM
Dick...My friend Howie retired as an attorney, and has been living in Tampa, FL for the past 20+ yrs. He no longer plays pool, due to illness. I'll PM you an email address.

Scott Lee

Brian in VA
08-31-2006, 12:38 PM
Is that 168 lbs per square foot, one inch thick or did you mean cubic foot?

I ask because I just collected my Anni last week and I would have bet the slates, 1.25", were heavier than you state. I will gladly yield to a professional, though! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Based on your calculation, they each weighed about 225. My guess would have been closer to 300 each.

I will say, the darn things were very heavy. Written in chalk on one of the slates from the last time it was set up in 1987 were the words "Baby Slates!"

Table is really cool and I can't wait to set it up.

Brian in VA

Paul_Mon
09-01-2006, 03:01 AM
Good luck with the table Brian. You've got one of my favorites. The 168 pounds is one cubic foot of slate.

Paul Mon