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View Full Version : Cue Makers-How To Acheieve High Polish On Tips?



07-12-2002, 05:23 PM
Not that it is all that important but when I have a new cue made or a new tip put on by a cue maker the sides of the tip are very smooth and highly burnished/polished. As time goes by the high luster disappears and the sides take on a dull, dry, craked look.

How can I maintain that polished look? Also, I am going to start putting on my own tips and want to know how to get that look. I do not have a lathe and will be using small hand tools.

Also, I will be using layered tips and know the precautions about to much liquid and heat. I read in a previous post about dying the tip black with shoe polish but am not interested in that until more feedback comes in.

Regards, Kelly

Cueless Joey
07-12-2002, 05:27 PM
My local repairman uses a finish sealer like Turner's.

07-12-2002, 08:40 PM
Before I wisely invested in a lathe, I made a shaft spinner by mounting a pillow block on a 1"x12"x12" board with a Willard's Shaft Holder & Collet coupled to a small (0.2hp) motor/foot pedal. My main problem was burning up motors.
I burnish with a small piece of natural color leather.

Good for you that you're aware of the potential problems with layered tips. I have been fortunate in that I experimented prior to going "public" and therefore have yet to have a de-lamination on a customer cue.

Troy

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Kelly:</font><hr> Not that it is all that important but when I have a new cue made or a new tip put on by a cue maker the sides of the tip are very smooth and highly burnished/polished. As time goes by the high luster disappears and the sides take on a dull, dry, craked look.

How can I maintain that polished look? Also, I am going to start putting on my own tips and want to know how to get that look. I do not have a lathe and will be using small hand tools.

Also, I will be using layered tips and know the precautions about to much liquid and heat. I read in a previous post about dying the tip black with shoe polish but am not interested in that until more feedback comes in.

Regards, Kelly <hr></blockquote>

ted harris
07-12-2002, 08:42 PM
Just put a little spit on the side of the tip and spin by hand with a paper towel, towel, peice of cloth, whatever, and it will burnish the sides and help prevent mushrooming. Good luck!

Troy
07-12-2002, 09:59 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> Before I wisely invested in a lathe, I made a shaft spinner by mounting a pillow block on a 1"x12"x12" board with a Willard's Shaft Holder &amp; Collet coupled to a small (0.2hp) motor/foot pedal. My main problem was burning up motors.
I burnish with a small piece of natural color leather.

Good for you that you're aware of the potential problems with layered tips. I have been fortunate in that I experimented prior to going "public" and therefore have yet to have a de-lamination on a customer cue.

Troy

&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Kelly:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; Not that it is all that important but when I have a new cue made or a new tip put on by a cue maker the sides of the tip are very smooth and highly burnished/polished. As time goes by the high luster disappears and the sides take on a dull, dry, craked look.

How can I maintain that polished look? Also, I am going to start putting on my own tips and want to know how to get that look. I do not have a lathe and will be using small hand tools.

Also, I will be using layered tips and know the precautions about to much liquid and heat. I read in a previous post about dying the tip black with shoe polish but am not interested in that until more feedback comes in.

Regards, Kelly &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt; <hr></blockquote>

Tommy_Davidson
07-13-2002, 01:51 AM
&gt; I have been using this method for years on my own cues and on request for my customers. While the shaft is spinning in the lathe,and after all sanding coarser than 1000 grit is done,I use a little dab of thin-viscosity super glue on the sides. I apply it directly from the tube to the sides of the tip,from the bottom towards the crown,to avoid it getting on the ferrule. I wipe the excess off quickly and carefully with a paper towel,again wiping from the base of the tip towards the crown. I give it a few seconds to thoroughly dry,then hit it with some 1000 grit sandpaper,to level it out,then continue to polish it with 1200,1500,2000,etc,then apply my sealer and wax just like normal. The effect must be seen to be appreciated,especially when combined with blacking out the tip with a Sharpie,as some people like,or using Joe Porper's tip dressing,which is quite messy unless applied with a fresh Q-Tip. It looks great on natural colored tips as well,and helps inhibit mushrooming to a certain extent,due to the glue sealing up the sides. For coloring the tip,I use a regular Sharpie,as opposed to the larger ones for better control,and the finer pointed ones don't last very long. I saw a cuemaker/repairman from Owensboro named Roger Leach use some kind of a small polishing stone or hard wax stick for dressing his tips,but have yet to find out exactly what it was. Tommy D.

Q-guy
07-13-2002, 09:14 AM
I have recently been using jewelers rouge. I like to polish the ferrule with it but it makes the tip look great also. It must be done on a lathe though to get the real effect. It is funny how a little detail like that, that cost nothing and takes a few seconds, impresses the customer so much.

Barbara
07-13-2002, 09:19 AM
And then get a black magic marker and use it on the sides. This is what my Cue Man does and it makes the tip look that much better. It also seals the sides of the tip.

Barbara

Troy
07-13-2002, 10:49 AM
But Talisman Tony expressly suggests avoiding doing this with Talisman Tips.

Troy

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Barbara:</font><hr> And then get a black magic marker and use it on the sides. This is what my Cue Man does and it makes the tip look that much better. It also seals the sides of the tip.

Barbara <hr></blockquote>

Q-guy
07-13-2002, 11:12 AM
I see people do this, but what is the reason? And why black? I think a tip looks better in it's naturel color. Most tips after being finished properly, take on a nice brown to dark brown color. May be opinion, but certainly looks better then black.

Barbara
07-13-2002, 11:45 AM
Really Troy? I wonder why? Anyway, the tip doesn't seem any worse for wear. I haven't had any problems with Talisman tips except for trying to get two tips with roughly the same hit.

Barbara~~~gotts go see her Cue Man soon...

Troy
07-13-2002, 12:01 PM
Talisman Tony advises against putting anything on the side of the tips, probably to avoid any potential softening of the laminate glue.

Personally, after burnishing I let the tip "rest" for about 30 minutes prior to shaping to allow the adhesive re-set.

Troy...~~~ Has not had a layered tip failure on a customer cue.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Barbara:</font><hr> Really Troy? I wonder why? Anyway, the tip doesn't seem any worse for wear. I haven't had any problems with Talisman tips except for trying to get two tips with roughly the same hit.

Barbara~~~gotts go see her Cue Man soon... <hr></blockquote>

stickman
07-13-2002, 01:12 PM
The only thing I use on my Talisman is a Willard dime shaper, (very sparingly) and the Porper mushroom grazer to remove the mushroom after the initial breakin. My water buffalo tip is black on the sides without any doctoring. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif I have polished up the sides with 2000 grit, but only by hand, so as not to generate any excessive heat. Once it's broke in, about I need is chalk. The tip requires minimal maintenance.

Cueless Joey
07-13-2002, 01:16 PM
All these Talisman maintenance and installing tips are scaring me. My local cuemaker slaps in Hercules, shapes them with his cutter and blackens the side and he's having no problems as of yet.

ted harris
07-13-2002, 02:52 PM
You should be very careful with the magic marker as the chemicals in it dry out the tip and cause it to dry rot. I see a lot of tips with big chunks ripped out of them that have been magic markered. IMHO, you should use something designed to work with leather, like Fiebings leather dye from any local shoe store. Should not cost more than $5-. Just apply it with a q-tip, let stand for a minute or two, being careful not to get it on the ferrule, and then burnish.

ted harris
07-13-2002, 02:54 PM
The Fiebings leather dye comes in about 40 colors. I have it in brown as well. Heck, I even have pink.

stickman
07-13-2002, 03:04 PM
I don't feel it's anything to be scared of, more like understanding the differences. Some of the tools I previously used on my non layered tips, I no longer use. I use a mushroom grazer rather than a mushroom burnisher. I never use my tip pick, but never need it anymore.

Barbara
07-13-2002, 03:18 PM
Well Sweetie, you know who my Cue Man is. He's the only one I'd allow to touch your Sneaky Pete I have from you...

Barbara~~~Ted's got pecans for life from me.... /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif!

Barbara
07-13-2002, 03:24 PM
Q-Guy,

The black contrast against a nice ivory ferrule helps me focus about where I'm aiming my ferrule. Or, where I used to. It's been so long since I've played, I have to really imagine what I used to do.

Barbara

SPetty
07-13-2002, 06:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Q-guy:</font><hr> I see people do this, but what is the reason? And why black? I think a tip looks better in it's naturel color. Most tips after being finished properly, take on a nice brown to dark brown color. May be opinion, but certainly looks better then black. <hr></blockquote>Hi Q-guy,

The man that installed my tip used a brown marker. It quickly wore off, but looked nice for awhile.

TalismanTony
07-13-2002, 09:20 PM
Hi Guys,

I usually recommend against the felt tip method as its possible that the chemicals in the ink will react with the glue compound. Also as mentioned by Ted it could effect the leather layers. Different brands of felt pens may be ok and some not, but to save any problems I advise against their use. We have done some testing with this and found certain pens can cause problems and not just with our tips, both Hercules and Moori tips had problems with some inks.

My recomendations are go with a little spit (not too much) and a paper towel or a dollar note, Or go with the leather strip that Troy mentioned.

Kind regards,

Jay M
07-14-2002, 04:18 AM
The only thing I've ever used to burnish a tip was some saliva and a dollar bill. take a little saliva, wipe it on the side of the tip (if the tip and ferrule are slimy you used too much...lol). take a dollar bill and fold it lengthwise twice and width wise once so you end up with a long thin strip. Wrap the strip around the tip, squeeze tightly and turn the shaft until you hear the tip start to squeak and it slips through the dollar without grabbing. The tip will end up nice and shiny and you won't have hurt it a bit. Note that you will want to check the edges on top to make sure they didn't get burnished also, causing you to miscue.

Jay M

cheesemouse
07-14-2002, 05:02 AM
JayM,
It's more impressive if you use a $100 bill...LOL /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif Another handy and useful item is a matchbook which is all ready the proper size.

SpiderMan
07-15-2002, 08:33 AM
I like to use a hundred-dollar bill instead of a random piece of paper to burnish the sides. This means nothing to some, but a lot to many. Pool players seem to be a superstitious bunch in general. Use a fresh one and some of the green ink will darken the tip.

SpiderMan

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: ted harris:</font><hr> Just put a little spit on the side of the tip and spin by hand with a paper towel, towel, peice of cloth, whatever, and it will burnish the sides and help prevent mushrooming. Good luck! <hr></blockquote>

07-15-2002, 02:54 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Kelly:</font><hr> Not that it is all that important but when I have a new cue made or a new tip put on by a cue maker the sides of the tip are very smooth and highly burnished/polished. As time goes by the high luster disappears and the sides take on a dull, dry, craked look.

i would think that the dull, dry, cracked look is being caused from someone using super glue to burnish the tip. can't imagine anyone doing this and expecting it to last.
plain water or just plain spit is the best. always allow enough time for either to penatrate before burnishing. i wet &amp; let dry wet and then burnish using a ben franklin burnishing sheet if out in public, at home i use a brown paper sack( leather is best). i spin my shaft on a drill press using a bolt with the head removed and a jam nut to snug the shaft against. --- just polishing a tip is not the purpose of burnishing - burnishing hardens the tip sides and if properly done prevents mushrooming. soft or cheap tips being the exception

07-15-2002, 03:50 PM
I like sander sealer and lacquer thinner. I have used this on anything from a cuetec right on up to and including Szamboti's. Works great and gives what I consider to be the best luster. You will probably need a lathe to make it shine the best, but could use a piece of leather or paper money.

here are some tips from a Barry Szamboti with this method
http://proficientbilliards.com/examples/barryszamboti.htm

Troy
07-15-2002, 10:49 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: simsd:</font><hr> soft or cheap tips being the exception <hr></blockquote>
My experience with Talisman Pro Soft tips is that they do NOT mushroom.

Troy...~~~ Using the same Talisman Pro Soft for about a year.

Rod
07-16-2002, 02:19 AM
I prefer natural myself. Black is distracting to me. Looks like a sore thumb.

TonyM
07-17-2002, 11:23 PM
Most of the reccommendations from the resident cuemakers/repair persons are not of much use to those without access to lathe (which is by far the best way to do the job).

It is difficult to get the same kind of results when working with simple hand tools, but a good job can be achieved.

One method that I used to use bl (bl = before lathe - lol!), was the following:

After cutting the sides of the tip flush with the ferrule (I used a sharp single edged razor blade, with the shaft vertical, and the tip down on a flat surface) I wet-sand the sides of the tip using 320 grit wet or dry paper. The ferrule is masked off with tape to prevent the removal of too much material.

Then I removed the tape and did a small amount of further wet sanding with 600 grit paper (or even finer - 1000 grit is good, see your local automotive finishing supply store).

The sides of the tip is then burnished with a paper towel (while it is still damp from the wet sanding) using a firm rotating motion. The faster you can rotate it, the better the burnish.

As a final touch, I rub a small amount of Vaseline Intensive Care lotion (the dry skin variety) into the sides of the tip and burnish with a dry paper towel or a piece of leather. This gives a very nice shine to the sides of the tip and does not dry-out the leather like spit or water can.

Try not to get any on the playing surface. If you do, scuff the tip to remove that layer of leather.

You can also use the lotion to keep the sides of the tip looking smooth and supple (lol!) by a regular treatment. I've found no ill effects from this, and it makes sense as it is a product made for skin. Leather is after all a "skin"!

With my lathe I use a bit of metal polish and a cloth to polish the ferrule to a bright lustre as well as the sides of the tip. The polish contains an oil that keeps the tip looking shiny for a long time. Then I use a small amount of "Turner's Polish" (a product suplied by Behlen's that is mostly Shellac with some oil and laquer added to the mix)to really give the ferrule and tip that high gloss and protection.

But both methods are really a lathe application, not a hand application.

I hope that this helps!

Tony