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SnakebyteXX
08-24-2006, 08:47 PM
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So it is no accident, I think, that the modern view that the death penalty is immoral is centered in the West. That has little to do with the fact that the West has a Christian tradition, and everything to do with the fact that the West is the home of democracy. Indeed, it seems to me that the more Christian a country is the less likely it is to regard the death penalty as immoral. Abolition has taken its firmest hold in post–Christian Europe, and has least support in the church–going United States. I attribute that to the fact that, for the believing Christian, death is no big deal. Intentionally killing an innocent person is a big deal: it is a grave sin, which causes one to lose his soul. But losing this life, in exchange for the next? The Christian attitude is reflected in the words Robert Bolt’s play has Thomas More saying to the headsman: “Friend, be not afraid of your office. You send me to God.” And when Cranmer asks whether he is sure of that, More replies, “He will not refuse one who is so blithe to go to Him.” For the nonbeliever, on the other hand, to deprive a man of his life is to end his existence. What a horrible act! <hr /></blockquote>

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The reaction of people of faith to this tendency of democracy to obscure the divine authority behind government should not be resignation to it, but the resolution to combat it as effectively as possible. We have done that in this country (and continental Europe has not) by preserving in our public life many visible reminders that—in the words of a Supreme Court opinion from the 1940s—“we are a religious people, whose institutions presuppose a Supreme Being.” These reminders include: “In God we trust” on our coins, “one nation, under God” in our Pledge of Allegiance, the opening of sessions of our legislatures with a prayer, the opening of sessions of my Court with “God save the United States and this Honorable Court,” annual Thanksgiving proclamations issued by our President at the direction of Congress, and constant invocations of divine support in the speeches of our political leaders, which often conclude, “God bless America.” <font color="red"> All this, as I say, is most un–European, and helps explain why our people are more inclined to understand, as St. Paul did, that
government carries the sword as “the minister of God,” to “execute wrath” upon the evildoer.</font color> <hr /></blockquote>

web page (http://www.firstthings.com/ftissues/ft0205/articles/scalia.html)

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<font color="blue">From Justice Scalia, a Chilling Vision of Religion’s Authority in America
by Sean Wilentz


PRINCETON, N.J. -- Earlier this year Antonin Scalia decided to share some aspects of his worldview with the public. His inspiration seems to have been the death penalty: recent debates with his colleagues on the Supreme Court and his general reflections on the legitimacy of the state taking to itself the power to kill a citizen. Justice Scalia spoke on these matters at the University of Chicago Divinity School in January, beginning with the ritual disclaimer that "my views on the subject have nothing to do with how I vote in capital cases"; his remarks appeared in the May issue of First Things: The Journal of Religion and Public Life. They are supplemented by his dissent to the court's decision on June 20 that mentally retarded people should not be executed. Justice Scalia's remarks show bitterness against democracy, strong dislike for the Constitution's approach to religion and eager advocacy for the submission of the individual to the state. It is a chilling mixture for an American. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

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<font color="blue"> Because Mr. Scalia is on the Supreme Court, and because President Bush has held him up as an example of judicial greatness, his writings deserve careful attention.

Mr. Scalia seems to believe strongly that a person's religious faith is something that he or she (as a Roman Catholic like Mr. Scalia) must take whole from church doctrine and obey. In his talk in Chicago, Mr. Scalia noted with relief that the Catholic Church's recent opinion that the death penalty was very rarely permissible was not "binding" on Catholics. If it had been, Mr. Scalia said, this teaching would have led the church to "effectively urge the retirement of Catholics from public life," given that the federal government and 38 states "believe the death penalty is sometimes just."

Mr. Scalia apparently believes that Catholics, at least, would be unable to uphold, as citizens, views that contradict church doctrine. This is exactly the stereotype of Catholicism as papist mind control that Catholics have struggled against throughout the modern era and that John F. Kennedy did so much to overcome. But Mr. Scalia sees submission as desirable — and possibly the very definition of faith. He quotes St. Paul, "For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God."

"The Lord," Mr. Scalia explained in Chicago, "repaid — did justice — through His minister, the state."</font color><hr /></blockquote>
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<font color="blue"> In Chicago Mr. Scalia asserted, not for the first time, that he is a strict constructionist, taking the Constitution as it is, not as he might want it to be. Yet he wants to give it a religious sense that is directly counter to the abundantly expressed wishes of the men who wrote the Constitution. That is not properly called strict constructionism; it is opportunism, and it threatens democracy. His defense of his private prejudices, even if they may occasionally overlap the opinions of others, should not be mislabeled conservatism. Justice Scalia seeks to abandon the intent of the Constitution's framers and impose views about government and divinity that no previous justice, no matter how conservative, has ever embraced. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>
Article can be found here. (http://www.commondreams.org/views02/0708-03.htm) <font color="blue"> </font color> <font color="red"> </font color>

Gayle in MD
08-24-2006, 09:50 PM
Man, I think we've only seen the tip of the iceburg on the threat to our constitution!

/ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Drop1
08-25-2006, 12:34 PM
You want to be happy,get the idea of a God out of your mind. Antonin Scalia ranks right down there with Clarence Thomas. There is no God's Justice....if there was,everyone would be in Hell,including eGr8,for getting that BJ he dosen't want to talk about /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

eg8r
08-25-2006, 12:42 PM
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You want to be happy,get the idea of a God out of your mind. Antonin Scalia ranks right down there with Clarence Thomas. There is no God's Justice....if there was,everyone would be in Hell,including eGr8,for getting that BJ he dosen't want to talk about <hr /></blockquote> I will mimic Gayle here...If you want to read a great book (here is where I stop copying Gayle) on God's Justice you should pick up, "Driven by Eternity" by John Bevere. Read through that and see if your beliefs are not changed. Here is the link to Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0446578665/002-2050355-9861656?v=glance&amp;n=283155). It is affordable and many on the board act like they read a lot so go ahead and pick it up. It should be a quick read, but I won't lie, if you read it with an open heart it will not be an easy read.

eg8r

Drop1
08-25-2006, 05:57 PM
I will read your book,if you will read mine. And we can go through eternity,never thinking,but always accepting what others think,and say. You seem like a nice person,did you arrive believing what you do,by reading one book,or was it a life time of reading and exposure.

eg8r
08-28-2006, 07:31 AM
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You seem like a nice person,did you arrive believing what you do,by reading one book,or was it a life time of reading and exposure. <hr /></blockquote> If you read the book, in Chapter One you will have answer. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif However, I get to spend a lifetime making decisions on how I will spend eternity. These decisions will be based on everything, including reading and exposure.

eg8r