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Qtec
08-28-2006, 04:06 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Hot fuel for you and cold cash for big oil
When gasoline gets hot, it expands. But U.S. fuel pumps don’t account for the bigger volume, and it’s costing American consumers about $2.3 billion a year.
By STEVE EVERLY
© 2006, The Kansas City Star

SUFFOLK, Va. | Lesley “Lucky” Duke’s mood darkens with every drop of diesel that flows into his 2005 Freightliner big rig.

The 52-year-old independent trucker from Hertford, N.C., has just dropped off a load of potatoes and now is topping off his tank on a sweltering summer day.

He whips out a thermometer and takes the temperature of the $2.80-per-gallon fuel gushing into his truck’s tanks. The thermometer hits 80. Then 90. Finally, it stops at 93 degrees Fahrenheit.

“Hot” fuel is costing him the price of a good lunch today, Duke reckons, and as much as $700 a year.

It gnaws at him. Duke, you see, is one of the few Americans who realize that fuel is often sold at temperatures much hotter than the government standard of 60 degrees. It’s a standard agreed to nearly a century ago by the industry and regulators, but virtually unknown to the average consumer.

But you should understand it too — because collectively it’s costing us billions of dollars a year. An investigation by The Kansas City Star has found that at recent prices U.S. consumers are spending about $2.3 billion more for gasoline and diesel this year than they otherwise would if fuel pumps were adjusted to account for expansion of hot fuel.

It works this way.

As a liquid, gasoline expands and contracts depending on temperature. At the 60-degree standard, the 231-cubic-inch American gallon puts out a certain amount of energy. But that same amount of gas expands to more than 235 cubic inches at 90 degrees, even though consumers still only get 231 cubic inches at the pump.

Put simply, every degree over the 60-degree standard diminishes the energy a 231-cubic-inch gallon delivers to the nation’s fleet of cars, trucks, boats, buses and heavy equipment — and forces drivers to consume more and pay more for fuel.

It is basic physics that, depending on the temperature, can amount to just a few cents per gallon. But it adds up to big money — coming straight out of consumers’ pockets and going right to the bottom line of major oil companies and other fuel retailers in the energy pipeline.

Moreover, it’s perfectly legal, because even though your local filling station measures out your gas as if it were stored at 60 degrees, no law requires retailers to adjust the pump to reflect the expansion of hot fuel.

In other words, no law ensures you get what you pay for.

For Duke, a former Boy Scout, selling hot fuel is a lie. He recites the scout laws and lingers on “trustworthy.” He thinks retailers should adjust for temperature changes or offer customers a refund. He complains about the hot fuel to the truck stop’s cashier while handing her his credit card.

“You know what that means, don’t you?” he says, grousing about the money he is losing.

The cashier eyes the card.

“Debit or credit?” she responds. <hr /></blockquote>

Read on. web page (http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/15370193.htm?template=contentModules/printstory.jsp)

Pretty sneaky don't you think?
I,m convinced oil companies will do anything for a billion $.

Q

DickLeonard
08-28-2006, 04:39 AM
Qtec your right about Oil Companies doing anything for a Billion. They gave us George who has Last Place in the Presidents List already locked up with 2+ years to go. Hopefully Impeachment will shorten Our Sentence.####

Chopstick
08-28-2006, 05:40 AM
Yes, individuals who happen to have a clue have known this for years. That is why we buy fuel at night. Adjust the pump??? The guy who said that is an idiot.

eg8r
08-28-2006, 07:24 AM
Yup it is pretty sneaky and it is theft if they are doing it on purpose.

eg8r

SnakebyteXX
08-28-2006, 07:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> As a liquid, gasoline expands and contracts depending on temperature. At the 60-degree standard, the 231-cubic-inch American gallon puts out a certain amount of energy. But that same amount of gas expands to more than 235 cubic inches at 90 degrees, even though consumers still only get 231 cubic inches at the pump.

Put simply, every degree over the 60-degree standard diminishes the energy a 231-cubic-inch gallon delivers to the nation’s fleet of cars, trucks, boats, buses and heavy equipment — and forces drivers to consume more and pay more for fuel.

Q <hr /></blockquote>

Is the opposite true? Does the volume of a gallon of gasoline continue to contract as temps drop below sixty degrees?

If it is true then is it possible that gains due to the expansion of volume in the warm months of the year are offset by the contraction of same during the winter months?

Just wondering.

Snake

pooltchr
08-28-2006, 08:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Qtec your right about Oil Companies doing anything for a Billion. They gave us George who has Last Place in the Presidents List already locked up with 2+ years to go. Hopefully Impeachment will shorten Our Sentence.#### <hr /></blockquote>

I don't see how the oil companies profit from this. They make their money based on what is pumped through the pipelines. The ones profiting are the retail outlets. It's your local "pump 'n run" that you should be upset with. Or maybe your state government for not monitoring the accuracy of the pumps.
Steve

cushioncrawler
08-28-2006, 03:42 PM
I carnt see how anyone would necessaryly suffer from this hot fuel stuff. Koz, in the end, the price per gallon iz based on competition. Even if all petrol-sellers are crooks, they all have to compete, allbeit with other crooks -- see???

The real problem iz that the big-crooks are fleecing the small-crooks -- the big-crooks keep the new petrol very hot (at the refinery or depot), and it iz meazured out very hot, and delivered very hot -- but, by the time that the small-crooks get to sell it, it haz mostly cooled down. Thusly, the small-crooks are trying to cut their lossez.

U might say that the big-crooks allso have to compete (with other big-crooks) -- i dont think so.

pooltchr
08-28-2006, 06:11 PM
Gee...I'm starting to feel sorry for the "small crooks".

O-K, that feeling has passed! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Steve

cushioncrawler
08-28-2006, 08:18 PM
The thing that gets me iz that when i pull into a gas-station that haz dropped its price drastically, my Ford can often drink az much az 70 litres, even tho it haz never drunk more than 67 litres at a dear gas-station. Its a long time since i've seen an inspector filling hiz-her stainless-steel-can at a bowzer -- state government (Victoria) cost cutting strikes again.