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poolturtle
09-18-2006, 08:41 AM
Ok guys...2 days back and I'm already asking for advice. /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

I haven't had the time to play serious pool lately (tournaments, really good players, etc) Most of my pool time, which is rare lately, has been when I'm hanging out with friends and we just happen to play a couple of games while at the bar or whatever. Now, I've never professed to be an excellent player, but I am considerably better than the friends I hang out with. So, to try to even up the match one night, I offered to play left handed. I've practiced a few shots before, mostly to get out of tight spots where the stretch across the table called for it, but never a full game until now.

Surprisingly, I wasn't too far off my regular game, at least not as far as I expected to be. I don't quite have the level of coordination I do with my right, but I know this is completely understandable.

My question is, does anybody know of any good drills (short of playing thousands of games /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif) that would concentrate on building the muscle memory in my left arm? I've just about got the bridge under control, but my major problem is getting a consistant, straight stroke.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Drop1
09-18-2006, 10:16 AM
Stroke into the mouth of a beer bottle,and you will be supprised at how quickly you have a good left hand stroke. Remember to make allowances for your domonant eye.

Harold Acosta
09-18-2006, 11:25 AM
In addition to what Drop1 recommended, you should just practice basic skills. Stop shots, some banking, basic cue control, open bridge, closed bridge, etc. As if you were a novice player. In a short time-frame you should be able to draw and use side-english.

cueball1950
09-18-2006, 12:26 PM
The person to talk with is ####leonard...we call him butch...anyway, he is the best switch hitter i have ever seen in over 40 years. He is normally a rightie but dues to a couple of problems he has been shoting leftie. To tell you how good he is switching. I played him once. he played me 150/75 with him shooting leftie. I broke and he ran 79 right off the bat on me. He has i know for sure a few runs over 100 opposite handed. Pm him and see if there is any way to talk with him personally. he would be a great help..believe me........................mike

mantis
09-18-2006, 08:33 PM
Stroke into the mouth of a beer bottle?? I have not ever heard of that (Of course I am a very medium level player without any coaching). You just put the dry bottle on the table and try to stroke the cue into the opening? This will not hurt the table with the bottle rolling around when you miss?

bsmutz
09-19-2006, 07:38 AM
Don't miss! You can use a plastic water bottle if the glass bottle scares you.

Curdog
09-19-2006, 08:48 AM
Poolturtle, I switched to lefty after many years due to a neurological problem I developed. I would be greatly interested in any comments you get on your pm's. I picked up the coordination pretty quickly, but the most difficult thing I have had to accomplish is setting my expectations at the proper level. I seem to think that I should try the same shots lefty which I was proficient at as a right hander. This simply ain't possible. Slow steady progression seems to work best.
I also decided that this was a good time to take lessons. My hope is to address fundamentals at an early stage before they become embedded in my game and form bad habits.
Good luck!

poolturtle
09-21-2006, 11:41 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I picked up the coordination pretty quickly, but the most difficult thing I have had to accomplish is setting my expectations at the proper level. I seem to think that I should try the same shots lefty which I was proficient at as a right hander. This simply ain't possible. Slow steady progression seems to work best.
<hr /></blockquote>

I have the same problem. I have to keep reminding myself that I'm just learning to play left-handed. I get to the table, see these shots or leaves that are almost second nature to me(right handed), and then get frustrated when I miss them. I tend to forget that I spent literally thousands of hours on the table to get to the point where I'm at. Strange how all that early learning time just sort of fades into a blur!

Thanks for the tips everyone. Though I don't get on the table much anymore, I'll try the suggestions whenever I can

Stretch
09-21-2006, 04:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Curdog:</font><hr> Poolturtle, I switched to lefty after many years due to a neurological problem I developed. I would be greatly interested in any comments you get on your pm's. I picked up the coordination pretty quickly, but the most difficult thing I have had to accomplish is setting my expectations at the proper level. I seem to think that I should try the same shots lefty which I was proficient at as a right hander. This simply ain't possible. Slow steady progression seems to work best.
I also decided that this was a good time to take lessons. My hope is to address fundamentals at an early stage before they become embedded in my game and form bad habits.
Good luck! <hr /></blockquote>

Lefty works best when i don't even think about it. When you switch avoid at all costs thinking oh i'm going to look stupid missing this, or any kind of "stroke instructions". don't waist time feeling wierd over it. Just step in, line er up with one or two strokes then do it.

Add off handed shots to every practice session in the area's where they come up. Over time they just become "routine" treat them as such with no indication that anything undue is even going on. St.

billiardshot
09-27-2006, 08:05 AM
I use a 5 lbs weigh on an old cue. Which also help strenghten the arm muscle. Just think you might never need a bridge again.

DickLeonard
09-27-2006, 11:18 AM
Cueball1950. Mike I started playing lefthand by just shooting the shots I couldn't reach righthanded. Soon I was making all my opposite handed shots. Of course being short gave me plenty of practice. The real secret of playing opposite hand is your still using your same brain.

Playing with Joe Canton for years I picked up his cueball control. It is easy to run balls when all your playing is easy shots. I tried to get Joe Canton to play the same shots but he was convinced he could never do anything with his left hand. He would have been dynamite if he could have played with his left hand.####

cueball1950
09-27-2006, 01:51 PM
Butch..... i would have loved to see Joe shoot opposite hand.
To bad he never took your advice..........mike

cushioncrawler
09-27-2006, 03:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Curdog:</font><hr> .....I switched to lefty after many years due to a neurological problem I developed...... <hr /></blockquote>

Curdog -- Woz this the "Yips" ?????

I have had 2 team-mates who had the yips at billiards. U see it at golf all the time -- uzually it iz when putting (golf) -- but sometimes on ordinary golf-shots, ie they might freeze at the end of the backswing.

The yips at billiards looks horrid -- one team-mate for a while had to hit the ball as soon as his chin touched the cue, uzually missed -- funny, the yips only affected him when he was potting the red (english billiards) -- shood call it the "Yip" -- recently i told him that he looks much better nowadayz (perhaps i shood'nt have mentioned it). The other team-mate ended up playing the whole season right-handed (he iz a leftie) -- but he ended up more or less giving the game away.

Me, myself, I am getting better and better playing left-handed -- this iz on a 12' table -- i even play screw-shots. Funny thing -- left-handed i need to uze a loop-bridge -- right-handed i never ever uze a loop-bridge.
madMac.

DickLeonard
09-28-2006, 05:14 AM
Cushioncrawler I had the same disease I attributed to pitching hardball as a youngster. If I was to shoot darts without the darts, once my arm got past 90% it would jump and vibrate uncontrollable. I sort of solved the problem by practicing stroking walking around the table then just get down, line up the shot and shoot.

My family Dr. cure was just shoot left handed but at that time I didn't have the time necessary to make the switch.

I had met Ray Martin at the Albany Golden Cue and he asked me where have you been and I extended my arm like a dart shooter and asked what would you do with an arm like this. He had no answer.####

SpiderMan
09-28-2006, 04:21 PM
Hey Doug,

Good to hear from you again. I ran into Fred a month or two ago, he still has your video.

Regarding the left-handed thing - I do some left-handed practicing now and then, partly to keep it from feeling too strange when I do it of necessity, but also to give my back a rest during a long practice session. After several hours of non-stop practice right-handed, it actually feels good to curl my spine "the other way" when shooting lefty.

What I do is simple, not a drill - I just try running racks while playing "Scotch Doubles" - one player is my left hand and the other is my right. It's sort of like a good player having a bad partner. The right hand must play in such a way to leave easy shots with automatic shape, so that lefty can pot a ball and still leave something. I'm probably the least-ambidextrous player I know.

But it does limber up my back, alternating shots that way.

SpiderMan

cushioncrawler
09-28-2006, 04:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> .....I had the same disease I attributed to pitching hardball as a youngster. If I was to shoot darts without the darts, once my arm got past 90% it would jump and vibrate uncontrollable..... <hr /></blockquote>

Actually, this reminds me of a No3 at our club -- old Tom -- he suddenly developed this jumpy-shakey thing -- it woz like the worst Parkinsons that u have seen -- he would take ages to shoot -- but he kept blaming a back-injury (recent???) -- a sort of pinched nerve -- he said that it only happened when he got into the shooting pozzy -- it woznt a problem doing anything else -- i didnt see him at all last year -- sounds like it beat him in the end.

poolturtle
09-28-2006, 04:41 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Good to hear from you again. I ran into Fred a month or two ago, he still has your video.
<hr /></blockquote>
Video? If it's the guy I'm thinking of, I let him borrow a book. Anyway, good to hear from you too. We'll have to catch up some time. It's been a while since I've received a quality lesson in 8 ball. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Qtec
09-28-2006, 07:35 PM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Left arm drills? You are joking , right? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

My advice? First you want to buy a left-handed cue. These are very rare but it just so happens that I now someone that knows ,,,,etc.... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

[ QUOTE ]
Sincerity is the key to everything. If you can fake that, you've got it made. <hr /></blockquote>

Qtec...../ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

cushioncrawler
09-29-2006, 02:05 AM
Q -- i agree -- i reckon that there iz no such thing az a left-handed cue. However, right-handed cues were actually made in the oldendayz -- i happen to possess 2 of theze -- both made in 1898.

It works like this -- ash cues uzually warp az they age -- the warping iz uzually directly across the grain -- the warping iz uzually such that if u hold the old cue with the arrowz pointing away from u, and on top, then the warp iz upwards -- and of course, if u hold the cue with the arrowz pointing toward u, the warp iz downwards.

Nextly, modern cues might have a bevel at the end of the butt -- if so, then this bevel iz parallel to the grain -- not so in the oldendayz. In the oldendayz, the cue-smiths knew that, for a right-hander, the bevel had to be about 15dg off parallel to better suit the way that the average player'z hand sat comfortably on the cue. Not only that, but, the cue-smith knew that the average player wanted the warp to help hiz billiardz shot -- the average billiard shot needed topspin to help the ball achieve natural rolling -- ie the warp had to be upwardz. Not only that, but, the cuesmith knew that some playerz wanted to hold the cue at the end -- hence, mostly, the bevel had to be "on top", and at a 15dg angle.

A left-hander, if he/she woz worryd about any of this, would need to order a special left-hander's cue -- but i have never seen or heard of one of theze.

Nowadayz, most playerz play snooker, not english billiardz -- a snooker player iz more worryd about getting nice eezy screw effects -- hence, based on the above, a right-handed snooker player would need the specially made cue, and left-handed snooker playerz would be happy koz the old cues suite them just fine. Hmmmmmmm -- i guess that this meanz that, in the snooker context, there are plenty of left-handed cues to be found, but zero right-handed cues --- hmmmmmmmm.

Of course, the modern cue-smith knowz all about this sort of stuff. (madMac).

SpiderMan
09-29-2006, 11:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote poolturtle:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
Good to hear from you again. I ran into Fred a month or two ago, he still has your video.
<hr /></blockquote>
Video? If it's the guy I'm thinking of, I let him borrow a book. Anyway, good to hear from you too. We'll have to catch up some time. It's been a while since I've received a quality lesson in 8 ball. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Maybe it was a book. He didn't have it on him or I'd have gotten it, and since you once swapped me a video I might have made the mental switch sometime since I've seen Fred. I know how to find him again, though - it's a new club with a new tournament.

SpiderMan