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View Full Version : Chao Crashes Out!!!



9 Ball Girl
07-16-2002, 09:48 PM
Full story here. Tee hee

http://worldpoolchampionship.com/article_detail.asp?article_id=94

Wally_in_Cincy
07-17-2002, 06:12 AM
Sorry I brought it up.

07-17-2002, 06:58 AM
Now this really puzzles me. Happiness and laughter over someone's losses and misfortunes? I don't care if this makes it better for your favorite players or not, but man, that's just plain cold.

Fran

cuechick
07-17-2002, 07:28 AM
I have to agree Fran. Anyone who has finished far below their own expectations in a tournament does not need anyone else to jeer(esp us peons who couldn't hope to hold a cue to him). All of these players work way to hard for far to little for that. A two time former Champion not making it to the top 64 has to be in enough pain without anyone else's help.
I also do not think it is very good karma.....

Lester
07-17-2002, 07:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fran Crimi:</font><hr> Now this really puzzles me. Happiness and laughter over someone's losses and misfortunes? I don't care if this makes it better for your favorite players or not, but man, that's just plain cold.&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;Ditto, Ditto and Double-Ditto on that! And that's not even thinking about the "Karma". ***Lester***

Fran <hr></blockquote>

Wally_in_Cincy
07-17-2002, 07:54 AM
Fran I certainly didn't mean to offend anyone and I'm sorry if I did. I was just "woofing" a bit /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif.

I just flat out don't like the guy. I'm fairly certain he doesn't read this board so it's not like he's gonna get his feelings hurt or something. He's not the first pool player I've rooted against but I wouldn't do it in somebody's face like people do to Earl Strickland.

Y'all are probably right about the karma thing though /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif

07-17-2002, 08:00 AM
I'm curious, Wally. What has he done to make you not like him? Maybe I've missed something but I've always seen him as a very quiet kind of guy. I've watched him play and he looks very professional to me, no antics or out of pocket stuff.

Fran

Wally_in_Cincy
07-17-2002, 08:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fran Crimi:</font><hr> I'm curious, Wally. What has he done to make you not like him? Maybe I've missed something but I've always seen him as a very quiet kind of guy. I've watched him play and he looks very professional to me, no antics or out of pocket stuff.

Fran <hr></blockquote>

http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccbboard&amp;Number=23881&amp; page=1&amp;view=expanded&amp;sb=6&amp;o=2#Post23881

But I might be wrong. Wouldn't be the first time.

9 Ball Girl
07-17-2002, 08:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fran Crimi:</font><hr>I've watched him play and he looks very professional to me, no antics or out of pocket stuff./quote]

Personally, I think Chao is an excellent player. As far as the antics are concerned, I saw a pic of Chao at last year's tourney on a cell phone during his match?--that supposedly disturbed the other players. And I think someone said he's a bit of a sharker--standing/moving in the line of his opponent's shot. Then again, this is what I've heard.

Ross
07-17-2002, 09:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fran Crimi:</font><hr> I'm curious, Wally. What has he done to make you not like him? Maybe I've missed something but I've always seen him as a very quiet kind of guy. I've watched him play and he looks very professional to me, no antics or out of pocket stuff.

Fran <hr></blockquote>

Here is a quote from RSB about his infamous "antics" in the 2000 WC's. I haven't heard other negative reports about him except that he often lays his cue or chalk down to mark possible angles for shots (but picks them up before he shoots). These negatives stay with him, possibly because he doesn't speak English and shows almost no emotions, so people don't have anything to counter the negatives with.

"In last years World Championship, the winner, Fong-Pang Chao was
accused of sharking on more than one occasion. Against Oliver Ortman,
when Ortman had a shot that was towards Chao's direction, where he was
sitting in his chair, Chao deliberately moved his head to one side then
back, just as Ortman was shooting, and he missed. Ortman complained and
Chao was warned. Also against Johl Younger where he demolished him 11-1
he was on his mobile phone in between a game."

07-17-2002, 04:19 PM
I don't understand the cell phone thing at all. Did anyone ever mention what exactly that was all about, like why he was on the phone? Was it an emergency?

As far as other things, like accusations of sharking, etc. Well, I've seen cases of sharking accusations all the time, particularly by the player who's losing.

I don't know anything about the guy, but I can say for sure that a couple of accusations about someone isn't going to cause me to start a thread that applauds his misfortune.

Fran

Tom_In_Cincy
07-17-2002, 04:45 PM
Fran, (it was a personal call, no emergency, and he did hang up asap and apologized)

Wally is prone to become emotional about his pool world associates.
I too have a "less than Positive" respect level for a Pro to show deliberate "sharking" moves as have been documented in BD and P&amp;B in last years World Games and qualifiers.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-18-2002, 06:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fran Crimi:</font><hr> I don't understand the cell phone thing at all. Did anyone ever mention what exactly that was all about, like why he was on the phone? Was it an emergency?

As far as other things, like accusations of sharking, etc. Well, I've seen cases of sharking accusations all the time, particularly by the player who's losing.

I don't know anything about the guy, but I can say for sure that a couple of accusations about someone isn't going to cause me to start a thread that applauds his misfortune.

Fran <hr></blockquote>

I don't remember which poolmag I read it in but Fong-Pang Chao definitely moved when Ortmann was shooting. It may have been Mike Panozzo reporting from Cardiff, I don't recall. Fran, you of all people should appreciate the deleterious effect that has on one's ball-pocketing ability. I believe that's one of your major pet peeves.

Anyway I have been sufficiently chastened. In the future I will celebrate other's misfortunes privately rather than publicly /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif

Sincerely,

Lester
07-18-2002, 06:24 AM
Anyway I have been sufficiently chastened. In the future I will celebrate other's misfortunes privately rather than publicly /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif

Sincerely, <hr></blockquote>&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;CHASTENED, SHMASTENED! I'd worry more about the "Karma" thing, Wally! ha ha ****Lester****

TomBrooklyn
07-18-2002, 12:42 PM
There are some interesting thoughts here about applauding the loss of a player in the relatively small and gentlemanly world of professional pool, when juxtaposed with the desire of many to see pool become a more mainstream spectator sport.

How could pool be expected to become more popular with the general sports fan if rivalries, favorites, and "hated" opponents were discouraged? What would happen to the fan base of baseball, football, hockey, and soccer etc. if they were expected not to root against the opponents of their favorite players/teams, often without rhyme or reason other than the accident of their geographical or national origin? Is it possible not to root for the loss of a certain player that one percieves as a threat later in the tourament to one's own favorite player? Can it be expected that all avid fans will be so genteel as to always be gracious to the opponents of their favorite players? Is it possible for me to cram any more hypothetical questions into this post?

9 Ball Girl
07-18-2002, 12:59 PM
I'm with you Wally!

BTW, the phone call thing--I read somewhere that he was talking to a friend/relative about the match.

07-18-2002, 02:04 PM
Tom, in this age, it's anything goes. Of course it's totally acceptable, in probably almost evey country, to cheer for someone's defeat, maybe with the exception of the monks in Tibet. I doubt they're into that kind of thing.

Does it mean it's right? Hell no, and if that's what we have to do to get pool into the sports mainstream, count me out.

The easy thing to do is to do what everybody else is doing. The hard thing to do is to go against the grain and then convince everyone that it's the better way.

Fran

07-18-2002, 02:15 PM
Ms. Crimi:

Well said. Sport without sportsmanship is dogfighting.

Regards,
Goldfish

Barbara
07-18-2002, 03:01 PM
I believe it's bad manners to cheer the defeat of an opponent. I won't do it. I hate when I see other people do it. My opponents in my bar league used to whoop and holler when they got a win against me. It stings. And since I know how I feel about it why would I visit that kind of feeling against an opponent I've just drilled?

I also believe in karma and that something like that will come back an bite you in the butt. And I'm not talking about the end of your cue.

Barbara

PQQLK9
07-18-2002, 04:33 PM
"Can't we all get along"
Rodney King

07-18-2002, 05:33 PM
I agree that celebrating the defeat of an OPPONENT is bad sportsmanship. A spectator/fan celebrating the defeat is quite different. I think it is good that people have strong feelings about the players. If more people had strong feelings about the players, cue sports would be more popular. Villans are good. It's part of what makes sports fun. I'd love to be pro pool's villan. Sadly, I don't have the game to back it up. /ccboard/images/icons/frown.gif
Without villans, there's really nobody to root FOR. Imagine "Dallas" without J.R. or "Star Wars" without Darth Vader.
Wasn't the last Tyson fight one of the best (if not the best) selling PPV of all time? Wonder why? I guarantee it wasn't because people thought it was going to be a great display of boxing tallent. People tuned in because they wanted to see what that freak was going to do next.

All of the talk on this and other message boards about pro pool being held back by it's seedy image is hogwash. The thing that's holding back pro pool is the fact that not enough people care one way or the other.

I don't care if you love me or hate me, just don't ignore me or think I'm boring!

heater451
07-18-2002, 05:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> Ms. Crimi:

Well said. Sport without sportsmanship is dogfighting.

Regards,
Goldfish <hr></blockquote>I understand that you were making a point, but I wouldn't say that about dogfighting, necessarily.

I do not condone dogfighting, but TRUE dogfighting had rules ( http://www.nyx.net/~mbur/apbtfaqmisc.html#rules ), and I'm willing to bet that there was more respect for another man's dog--since it was about "gameness" and NOT bloodshed.

If you want bloodshed, that's cockfighting--which is actually more 'natural' than dogfighting (because the dogs were specifically bred for it), but then again, some cockfights involve metal spurs. . . .

Now, as for celebrating an opponents defeat--is't that usually celebrating the win? However, I do see the difference in celebrating a winner, and deriding a loser, but that also seems to be a very American thing to do.

If you can walk more towards the middle, and win by a small margin, then you might begin to understand why the Japanese play baseball like they do (it's about winning, without causing to much of a loss of "face" to the opponent). . . .

A major difference between the 'animals' and us humans: ego.


(BTW, I 'own' an APBT, and she's a 60lb spoiled baby.)
====================

Barbara
07-18-2002, 05:46 PM
I was responding as a player defeating my opponent. And I would act accordingly as an audience member, too. I would only applaud for a win, not a loss, and maybe, not at all, considering the circumstances.

Barbara~~~likes positives waves, hates those negative waves...

07-18-2002, 07:22 PM
heater451:

Thank you for your response. Japanese athletes and competitors in nonathletic games are known for their good sportsmanship and for their personal dignity. I believe that we should conduct ourselves more as they do--and less like fighting dogs.

Regards,
Goldfish

Wally_in_Cincy
07-19-2002, 07:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: TomBrooklyn:</font><hr> There are some interesting thoughts here about applauding the loss of a player in the relatively small and gentlemanly world of professional pool, when juxtaposed with the desire of many to see pool become a more mainstream spectator sport.

How could pool be expected to become more popular with the general sports fan if rivalries, favorites, and "hated" opponents were discouraged? What would happen to the fan base of baseball, football, hockey, and soccer etc. if they were expected not to root against the opponents of their favorite players/teams, often without rhyme or reason other than the accident of their geographical or national origin? Is it possible not to root for the loss of a certain player that one percieves as a threat later in the tourament to one's own favorite player? Can it be expected that all avid fans will be so genteel as to always be gracious to the opponents of their favorite players? Is it possible for me to cram any more hypothetical questions into this post? <hr></blockquote>

Well the Brits have found a "villain" to root against. If you read the message board at www.worldpoolchampionship.com (http://www.worldpoolchampionship.com) you will see they do not like Mr. Strickland much.

stickman
07-19-2002, 09:47 AM
Barbara, One of my old league teams used to cheer and whoop it up when we got a win, but to my knowledge we were cheering the win, not the defeat. Of course, if they only cheered when you were defeated, that would suck. /ccboard/images/icons/frown.gif