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wolfdancer
10-24-2006, 09:24 PM
It looks like the GOP has stolen an idea from an old Dem political ad
CNN) -- Republicans took a page from President Johnson's Cold War-era presidential campaign with an advertisement set to air this weekend called "The Stakes," which prominently features al Qaeda leaders threatening to kill Americans.

"Just like in the Cold War, the reality is that our nation is at war with an ideology and not a country," said Republican National Committee spokeswoman Tracey Schmitt.

Democrats, however, have called the commercial, which is reminiscent of Johnson's 1964 "Daisy" ad, a "desperate ploy to once again try to scare voters."

The advertisement, which is available on the Republican National Committee Web site, is scheduled to run on national news networks Sunday. Republicans are emphasizing national security and terrorism issues in their bid to maintain control of Congress with about two weeks before the November midterms. (Watch how terror has been a popular theme on the campaign trail -- 2:10 Video)

The ad features al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and his top lieutenant, Ayman al-Zawahiri, speaking, but the only sound is a ticking clock in the background. The terror leaders' quotes are posted on the screen and key phrases in the quotes stand alone as the rest of the quote fades out.

In one instance, bin Laden is quoted as saying, "With God's permission we call on everyone who believes in God ... to comply with His will to kill the Americans." As the text of the quote fades out, "kill the Americans" remains on the screen.

Another bin Laden quote: "They will not come to their senses unless the attacks fall on their heads and ... until the battle has moved inside America" -- fades out, leaving only "inside America" on the screen.

Meanwhile, footage of terrorists engaged in martial arts and weapons training rolls in the background. One scene shows terrorists traversing monkey bars over fire.

The ticking clock morphs into a heartbeat as the ad comes to a close, and the only spoken words on the commercial announce, "The Republican National Committee is responsible for the content of this advertising." (View "The Stakes" at the RNC Web siteexternal link)

The ad plays off of Johnson's powerful "Daisy" ad, which CNN senior political analyst Bill Schneider called "the most famous political ad in American history." Johnson used the ad in his successful re-election bid against Barry Goldwater.

In the "Daisy" ad, a small girl counts to 10 as she picks petals from a flower. When she reaches 10, the camera zooms in on her eye and an ominous voice counts backward from 10 to zero.

When the countdown reaches zero, a nuclear bomb explodes, followed by Johnson speaking.

"These are the stakes to make a world in which all God's children can live or to go into the dark," Johnson says on the ad. "We must either love each other or we must die."

A voice follows Johnson's, urging viewers to re-elect the Texas Democrat and says, "The stakes are too high for you to stay home."

The Democratic National Committee issued a statement saying the new Republican ad was an attempt to distract voters from GOP failures.

"Once again we see that the GOP will truly do and say anything regardless of whether or not it's true, they are so desperate to hold onto power," Democratic National Committee Communications Director Karen Finney said in a statement. "Clearly Republicans are so afraid of their abysmal record they can't offer one example of what they've done to keep America safe."

Republicans contend otherwise and say the ad "underscores the high stakes America faces in the global war on terror by using the words of the terrorists themselves as they describe their intention towards the United States," according to a statement.
From www.davenetics.com/ (http://www.davenetics.com/)

Now it seems to me that both parties had their say in that column of Dave Pells. I'm wondering though, is this the kind of post, one that points out something, but does not make any moral judgement...is this the kind of post that would make advertisers threaten to pull the plug?
Admittedly the Dem quote does take to task the GOP ad....but a strong comparision is made to the Dems doing the same thing way back when.
See the problem then becomes what is offensive, and what is not?
Is it anything that appears to be neg about the GOP? and is there any "wiggle room" allowed?

Gayle in MD
10-24-2006, 09:46 PM
NO! No Wiggling! Dat iz verboden!

If they win both houses, I'm leavig the country. I'm packing up my pool tapes, and I'm going to move to...ah, well, maybe I'll stay, just a little longer, lol.

wolfdancer
10-24-2006, 10:16 PM
I've been having trouble with this "propaganda" charge that is being bandied about. Reminiscent of old Sen Joe and the HUAC.
But I jes ain't as smart as I thought I was.
Seems that the charge of Propaganda, while reeking of "thought crime"
is a perfectly valid one. Looking up an extended meaning on the Webster site:
3 : ideas, facts, or allegations spread deliberately to further one's cause or to damage an opposing cause; also : a public action having such an effect.
I didn't know facts, and ideas counted as propaganda...and I'm sure they were posted here to "further the cause"
alright then....no more facts,nor ideas posts...that should restore the harmony here. in fact we could change the site name to eharmony. com...get folks thinking ,do not offend....
Now heres a wholesome story, of the kind that should be limited to being posted here...completly non-political, warm.
"Patches" a horse that enjoys riding in a car, and eating cheeseburgers
web page (http://video.yahoo.com/video/play?vid=eb7ae6527e38c793b68da9e92bd1cded.924919&c ache=1)
I see something cannibalistic though in a horse eating a hamburger...like Republicans eating their young (that was just a metaphor) nothing political intended.

pooltchr
10-25-2006, 05:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> It looks like the GOP has stolen an idea from an old Dem political ad
CNN) -- Republicans took a page from President Johnson's Cold War-era presidential campaign.....
<font color="red"> Seems they are learning from the best! </font color>

Democrats, however, have called the commercial, which is reminiscent of Johnson's 1964 "Daisy" ad, a "desperate ploy to once again try to scare voters."

<font color="red"> So what was it when LBJ did it?? </font color>



The ad plays off of Johnson's powerful "Daisy" ad, which CNN senior political analyst Bill Schneider called "the most famous political ad in American history." Johnson used the ad in his successful re-election bid against Barry Goldwater.

<font color="red"> Note the word "successful" </font color>


The Democratic National Committee issued a statement saying the new Republican ad was an attempt to distract voters from GOP failures.

"Once again we see that the GOP will truly do and say anything regardless of whether or not it's true, they are so desperate to hold onto power," Democratic National Committee Communications Director Karen Finney said in a statement.
<font color="red"> Finney seems to be upset that the Republicans are using Dem tactics in the campaign. </font color>

Admittedly the Dem quote does take to task the GOP ad....but a strong comparision is made to the Dems doing the same thing way back when.
<hr /></blockquote>
<font color="red"> This article simply points out that both parties will do whatever is necessary to win an election. Same concept....different party! It seems like a case of the pot calling the kettle black. While I am not particularly fond of this tactic, the Dems proved it can be effective. So what's the problem?
Steve </font color>

wolfdancer
10-25-2006, 08:36 AM
Steve, I never said there was a problem. (I personally don't like smear campaigns...)
I thought the article faulted both parties equally.....but wondered since it mentioned the GOP...did it then fail the litmus test for hate?

Gayle in MD
10-25-2006, 08:49 AM
What a disgrace...that horse, hates cows! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

pooltchr
10-25-2006, 11:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> Steve, I never said there was a problem. (I personally don't like smear campaigns...)
I thought the article faulted both parties equally.....but wondered since it mentioned the GOP...did it then fail the litmus test for hate? <hr /></blockquote>

I agree. All the adds running in this market are about personality, not real issues. And if they do mention issues, it's all about how "my opponent voted against or for this or that"
Here's a good question. Do you think it is possible in this day, to run a successful campaign that only addresses what the candidate can or will do, or has done, without mentioning their opponent?
Steve

wolfdancer
10-25-2006, 12:01 PM
Man, that's heretical, politically speaking. I'm not sure the country is ready for something like that.
we like "black and white" as our political choices...and since none of these candidates can meet the "white" test....they try to prove the opponent is "black"
We end up with "Grey" though, either way we vote.
that's why I'm all for the Diebold voting machines, which function like a slot machine....let the luckiest candidate win