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slim
10-27-2006, 06:22 AM
My father played for the Chicago Black Hawks farm team before the war and I found this article amongst my moms scrap book, its headlined News Form Chicago Black Hawks at 1840 W. Madison Street Chicago 12,ILL since it related to the great Willie Hoppe I thought I'd pass it along.

JOHN PETER GOTTSELIG
Publicity Director
CHICAGO BLACK HAWKS

JOHN PETER GOTTSELIG, hails from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
He joined the Chicago Black Hawks back in 1928 and has been a member of the club ever since. He was a top-flight player with the Hawks for 17 years, manager-coach for 3 years and is new Publicity Director of the club.
GOTTSELIG, in his playing days, was considered the peer of all stickhandlers and because of his unusual dexterity in manipulating the puck was known as the "Hoppe of Hockey". He's recognized as on of the outstanding "puck'-raggers" of all time. On five occasions he topped the team in scoring, and was a member of the Black Hawks' two world championship aggregations in 1933-34 and 1937-38. He accounted for 189 goals and 209 assists (including playoffs) during his National HOckey League 00700P.
GOTTSELIG was born in Russia on the banks of the Black Sea near Odessa. He is the son of German parents who moved to Western Canada when John was but one year old.
GOTTSELIG is one of the few college graduates who played hockey. He graduated from St. John's College, Edmonton, Alberta.
Three major happenings stand out in GOTTSELIG'S highly active career. THe day he joined the Black Hawks some 30 years ago; the time he scored FOUR (4) goals singlehanded against New York Americans and the day he became a citizen of the United States of America. A great trio of events in any league.

I hope you all enjoyed reading this as much as I. Spent most of my earlier years around indoor and outdoor ice back in the day, back in Chicago.
I don't have the year the article was printed, nothing is on it, my mom cut it out.

I hope you all enjoyed reading this as much as I. Spent most of my earlier years around indoor and outdoor ice back in the day, back in Chicago.

I don't have the year the article was printed, nothing is on it, my mom cut it out.
I typed the above exactly as at looked, the only item that was unclear due to the bleed through of the typewriter ink ribbon was the 00700P
and the word puck raggers, the raggers word could be reggers, but raggers is most likely it, old hockey lingo.