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View Full Version : Purchasing a new cue, input PLEASE?



Opie9Ball
11-23-2006, 09:51 AM
hello, first off im new to this board, love it so far....i have been shooting pool, and have been taking lessons for about a month or so.....i love the game already...i have a cheap graphite excalibur lol...and want to upgrade to a stick within the 150-225$ price range...any reccomendations of what i should look at?? any input would be excellent....

BillPorter
11-23-2006, 02:08 PM
I'm sure you will get a variety of opinions on this one, but my advice would be to purchase a Lucasi that looks nice to you and is in your price range. Here are a couple of good Internet dealers:

http://www.billiardwarehouse.com/cues/lucasi/lucasi_pool_cues.htm

http://stores.ebay.com/Nielsens-Billiards_Lucasi-Vintage-Lightning-Cue_W0QQcolZ2QQdirZ1QQfsubZ3QQftidZ2QQtZkm

http://www.seyberts.com/pool_cues/brand-brand_id-13.htm

http://www.beadsandbilliards.com/lucasi1.html

http://www.hawleys.com/lucasi/lucasi.htm

MrLucky
11-24-2006, 05:28 AM
Well as <font color="red"> always </font color> I would suggest the McDermott line due to its great hit! consistency of manufacturing quality and its <font color="red"> Lifetime Warranty against warping and defects plus now they also will replace tips and do cleanings of your shaft for the life of the Cue for FREE! </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

video (http://www.mcdermottcue.com/McDermottFactoryTour.mpg)

Snapshot9
11-24-2006, 08:40 AM
Personally, if I was primarily interested in a good playing cue, I would go with this: Entry Custom Cue (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/newreply.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=239032&amp;page=0&amp;v iew=collapsed&amp;what=showflat&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;fpart=1&amp;vc=1) from Shurtz Custom Cues. You get choice of 4 different woods, type of finish, Irish Linen Wrap for a darn good price for a custom cue.

jjinfla
11-24-2006, 10:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MrLucky:</font><hr> Well as <font color="red"> always </font color> I would suggest the McDermott line due to its great hit! consistency of manufacturing quality and its <font color="red"> Lifetime Warranty against warping and defects plus now they also will replace tips and do cleanings of your shaft for the life of the Cue for FREE! </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

video (http://www.mcdermottcue.com/McDermottFactoryTour.mpg) <hr /></blockquote>

That sorta has the ring of free shipping that Kevin Trudeau tauts. The warranty/guarantee is nice but I doubt if many people will ship a cue just to replace the tip. Just being without it for three weeks would stop me from doing that. My cue guy will replace my tip in ten minutes and only charge me ten bucks. That works for me.

I have three McDermotts. A breakheart that I had a phenolic tip put on. And two of the animal series from 1990. I was given one, and bought the other two for $100 each and I compare them to my Schon LTD that I paid $500 for. I also think that the shafts of the McDermotts and the Schon compare to a 314 that I have which I carry in my case but do not use. They all have very expensive LePro tips on them.

Every now and then I will play with my Southwest but for some reason I really do not do well with it.

Jake

Sid_Vicious
11-24-2006, 11:00 AM
It is not in your price range, but the Predator SP which includes a 314 shaft has been a very popular move for many of the players I know. The Lucasi would be my suggestion if your cost is not flexible. As a friend of mine always says, "Get what you really want." The Predator would be my choice given that advice...sid

kd5kfl
11-24-2006, 03:34 PM
First thing to look for:

Put the shaft on a flat surface under a good light. Roll the shaft until you see a bunch of little short lines at right angles to the shaft. Looks like a herd of parentheses.

Now look at the figure - what undereducated people call the grain - right through the crowd of parentheses. The long thin brown lines. What you can see, with a little thoughtful analysis, is the shape of the stick that was chucked into the lathe.

A good stick will have straight lines, within the limits of nature. Long staight lines; that hunk of maple came from the trunk of the tree. If the lines suddenly veer off and go to the edge of the shaft, that is a weak shaft. It was originally a branch, or a bent trunk. If a gorilla like me smacks the cue ball hard, the shaft could shear there. If the lines drift and wander, that shaft was cut out of a branch. A tablesaw squared it up; a lathe made it round, but that was a crooked piece of lumber. The manufacturing process made it straight, but did not get rid of the tension in the wood that bent it as it grew. Time and humidity will correct that, and that shaft will banana.

Little brown spots - knots. Dead little twigs that the branch grew around. Just walk away.

The big cue manufacturers, and musical instrument makers, pay lumberyards a fee for the right of first refusal. They give the lumberyard $50,000 or thereabouts before the harvest, even if they don't buy the wood. The little guys are left with what's left. So McDermott et al gets the trunk and minor makers get the branches.

Next stop: The joint. Picture this sequence in your mind: You have a world class, one piece fly rod in your hand. You give it a snap. The motion travels down the rod, the end snaps like a whip, the motion travels back to your hand. A pleasant sensation.

Now do that with a two piece rod. The motion travels down the rod; hits the joint. Some of it reflects back from the joint, some goes to the tip. That energy gets reflected back from the tip, through the joint. Some of that gets reflected back to the tip...

You can feel the effects of the joint. On a quality rod, very little. On a cheap rod, it's nasty.

It's like that with cue sticks. Look at the joint of a McDermott or Meucci. A lot of wood to wood contact, with a hard fiberglass ferrule supporting it. That wood to wood contact absorbs the energy that bounces around in a two piece stick. A metal to metal joint, in my opinion, gives a harsh impulse to the wrist. Which I find gets painful quickly.

The quality of the wood in the shaft affects how long the stick stays straight, and together. The nature of the joint affects player comfort.

Everything else is just for pretty.

MrLucky
11-24-2006, 06:51 PM
<font color="red"> I should have elaborated but the maintenance is as follows.... </font color>






Twice a year. Every year, for life. Really. Maintenance is one of many hidden costs to consider when you’re looking at a cue’s price. For most cues, that is. Fortunately, McDermott offers the MOST comprehensive maintenance program ever. Not that our cues require maintenance often. Just about anything your McDermott cue might need replaced, checked or cleaned- tips, shafts, wraps, bumpers, ferrules- is fully covered under our exclusive Lifetime Maintenance program… for life. This will save you money. McDermott’s total commitment to your satisfaction doesn’t end when you take your new McDermott home. It only begins there.

The 10 Point Inspection Process
McDermott craftsmen check for details even the most careful player may not notice. Joints are checked, cosmetics evaluated, weights adjusted, and every minor detail inspected.

1. Check structural integrity

5. Replace Tip

8. Clean butt
2. Resand shaft

6. Clean ferrule

9. Redress Wrap
3. Clean Shaft

7. Adjust weight

10. Overall cosmetic Evaluation
4. Refinish Shaft


/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Opie9Ball
11-24-2006, 10:12 PM
just purchased a mcdermott mg7 for 180$...so far like it..:) thanks for the input fellas!

slim
11-25-2006, 02:38 PM
4 points, linen wrap, 19oz is a good base start for your first real cue, just find a name brand you like, at this juncture it doesn't help being too technical.

Brian in VA
11-25-2006, 03:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote kd5kfl:</font><hr>
Now look at the figure - what undereducated people call the grain - right through the crowd of parentheses. The long thin brown lines. What you can see, with a little thoughtful analysis, is the shape of the stick that was chucked into the lathe."

I hate to break this to you but it's called grain. What you're describing is called end-grain runout, not figure run out. Figure is the different formations within the grain highlighted or reduced by the cutting technique - flat sawing versus quarter sawing.

"A good stick will have straight lines, within the limits of nature. Long staight lines; that hunk of maple came from the trunk of the tree. If the lines suddenly veer off and go to the edge of the shaft, that is a weak shaft. It was originally a branch, or a bent trunk. "

Not necessarily. It could simply have been sawn out that way rather than split out which would follow the grain.

"If a gorilla like me smacks the cue ball hard, the shaft could shear there. If the lines drift and wander, that shaft was cut out of a branch. A tablesaw squared it up; a lathe made it round, but that was a crooked piece of lumber. The manufacturing process made it straight, but did not get rid of the tension in the wood that bent it as it grew. Time and humidity will correct that, and that shaft will banana."

Again, not necessarily. The processes you describe will give you a straight piece of wood but won't relieve tension. I've seen very straight grained wood develop a bend such as you describe - evidently there was some tension in there somewhere. Sometimes the kiln drying process can cause this if done incorrectly.

"Little brown spots - knots. Dead little twigs that the branch grew around. Just walk away."

"That's incorrect. Those little brown spots can be caused by any number of things."

"The big cue manufacturers, and musical instrument makers, pay lumberyards a fee for the right of first refusal. They give the lumberyard $50,000 or thereabouts before the harvest, even if they don't buy the wood. The little guys are left with what's left. So McDermott et al gets the trunk and minor makers get the branches."

Are you saying that a cue making company or musical instrument company has $50K to throw around for nothing?! I'll have a bottle of what ever you're drinking! These small companies don't make enough money to piddle away such an exorbitant sum!

"Next stop: The joint. Picture this sequence in your mind: You have a world class, one piece fly rod in your hand. You give it a snap. The motion travels down the rod, the end snaps like a whip, the motion travels back to your hand. A pleasant sensation.

Now do that with a two piece rod. The motion travels down the rod; hits the joint. Some of it reflects back from the joint, some goes to the tip. That energy gets reflected back from the tip, through the joint. Some of that gets reflected back to the tip...

You can feel the effects of the joint. On a quality rod, very little. On a cheap rod, it's nasty.

It's like that with cue sticks. Look at the joint of a McDermott or Meucci. A lot of wood to wood contact, with a hard fiberglass ferrule supporting it. That wood to wood contact absorbs the energy that bounces around in a two piece stick. A metal to metal joint, in my opinion, gives a harsh impulse to the wrist. Which I find gets painful quickly.

The quality of the wood in the shaft affects how long the stick stays straight, and together. The nature of the joint affects player comfort.

Everything else is just for pretty."
<hr /></blockquote> <font color="blue"> </font color> <font color="blue"> </font color> <font color="blue"> </font color> <font color="blue"> </font color> <font color="blue"> </font color> <font color="blue"> </font color>

I'm willing to agree with everything else you've said because I haven't studied the effects of joints on the cue. (I have studied wood for the past 25 years.) While you're advice gives some good guidelines for checking out a cue I'm afraid little of it's based in fact. Using your advice will get someone a good cue though. You might want to be a little more judicious in mixing opinions with facts.

Just my 2 cents.

Brian in VA

Sid_Vicious
11-25-2006, 05:18 PM
Great tag line...sid

MrLucky
11-26-2006, 05:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Opie9Ball:</font><hr> just purchased a mcdermott mg7 for 180$...so far like it..:) thanks for the input fellas! <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="green">I know you will enjoy it ! I have over 14 cues and my regular shooting cues are a McDermott Knight and a Jacoby ! </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

polar
11-26-2006, 06:46 PM
i would say go to the nearest billiard specialty shop in your area, i have to drive about 30 min to get to mine, and talk to the different cue makers and repairers. they will usualy give you an honnest opinion, and usualy they will let you hit with a few different cues. every cue hits different, i dont like vikings, i own one that i have had a new pin and shaft made for, but still dont like them, mcdermotts have a good selection of inexpensive cues that hit solid, lucasi has some good ones, as well as all major makers do, that is their buisness, you have to spend the time to make a wise decision and a personal choice. what i like and what u like may be 2 totaly different hits, and that shows absolutly nothing about skill level, just preferance. remember the cue dosent play the game u do