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View Full Version : Just ordered my VIP seats for the Open



Kato
07-18-2002, 10:10 AM
It's on. Voodoo and Kato in Norfolk September 25!!!!! Look out, this could get dangerous.

Kato~~~~Yippee!!!!!

MikeM
07-18-2002, 10:16 AM
Where are you and the big guy sittin'?

MM

Rich R.
07-18-2002, 10:26 AM
I look forward to seeing you and Voodoo there. I will be getting there some time on Wednesday. Unfortunately, I have to leave on Saturday.
Rich R.~~~will be in the cheap seats for this one.

Kato
07-18-2002, 10:26 AM
In the Billiard Cue.Com section. I tried to call Voodoo this morning but no answer. Capone Cues had 2 seats up front but Voodoo wanted to sit on an isle seat. Hence B 17-18.

Kato
07-18-2002, 10:28 AM
Don't worry Rich, you can't miss us. Just look for the biggest human being you've ever seen and you'll find us.

Kato~~~I'm the small one.

MikeM
07-18-2002, 10:49 AM
I'm directly across from y'all in J 18 & 19. Us big guys do appreciate an aisle seat!

MM

nAz
07-18-2002, 11:01 AM
How much were the tickets?
and is the food and drink cheaper then at Yankee stadium?

Kato
07-18-2002, 11:14 AM
I paid $200 per seat on my Visa card. That means by the time I pay them off it will have cost me $93,854. I've never been there but my roomate says the food is good and I don't think too expensive.

Not being a big guy myself I'm not particularly happy about our seating but what Voodoo wants, Voodoo gets. He doesn't want me getting squished, always looking out for me.

I'll be buying a digital camera this weekend. I'm going to take millions of pictures of all you guys to remember you by.

Kato~~~~realizes it's over 2 months away but is fired up bigtime!!!!!

nAz
07-18-2002, 11:19 AM
Kewl
Have a great time and be sure to get a spare battery and extra memory cards for that camera :}

Rich R.
07-18-2002, 11:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Kato:</font><hr>Not being a big guy myself I'm not particularly happy about our seating but what Voodoo wants, Voodoo gets. He doesn't want me getting squished, always looking out for me.
Kato~~~~realizes it's over 2 months away but is fired up bigtime!!!!! <hr></blockquote>
You could have sat on Voodoo's lap. Then he could have put his hand up your.......hmmmmmm.......back to make your head move. LMAO.
Rich R.~~~maybe not my best idea?????

Kato
07-18-2002, 11:54 AM
Seeing that I'm 31 years old and never owned anything more technical than a Polaroid this is a step up for me. I'll buy necessary batteries and memory cards. I'm going to love getting pics of everyone and hopefully pros to. I'm getting a real nice printer this weekend and I'll be doing a bunch of pictures to put in frames and stuff.

I'd also like to start a website and put all ya all on it and my fantasy football and stuff. That's afterward I guess.

Kato~~~technologically challenged but trying.

07-18-2002, 11:54 AM
Will they let you take pictures while the players are down on shots? If so then you might get really accustomed to setting up your new camera for shooting under the lights without your flash. Spiderman can give you lots of hints on what all to change to get the best results, things like incandescent or florescent, manual(fast) shutter speed, and other things I've forgotten. Anyway you wouldn't want Earl climbing in the stands to strangle you after his miss and your flash. And yes, I advise extra batteries and memory cards, enough cards to possibly shoot as high resolution as possible. You'll want to be able to pick details out of the background, so try not to have to limit your resolution if possible(just my 2c.)

Maybe there is a policy in effect already to restrict that...sid

Kato
07-18-2002, 11:59 AM
I'd assume there is a policy Sid though I don't know what it is. Maybe Brady could enlighten me or I'll just e-mail him. Voodoo knows EVERYONE and he doesn't know someone he does no someone that knows that someone so I'll get introduced to everyone. I'm sure everybody will be nice and let me take pics while not in action. Maybe we could take action shots of some of the guys (pros) at Q-Masters. I'm sure most of the CCB 'ers will let me take their pics (for a small fee), maybe even some while they are shooting (as long as they don't know, hehehehe).

Kato~~~planning on his feet. Hey Voodoo, how big is the trunk in a Lincoln TownCar?

Rich R.
07-18-2002, 12:04 PM
At the few tournaments that I have attended, photographs were allowed, but definitely NO FLASH.
I wish I could help with the camera issues, but I have not moved into the digital domain yet.
Rich R.~~~living in the past, photographically.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-18-2002, 12:06 PM
Howdy Sid,

The TD always makes it very clear at these tourneys- "NO FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY". If someone does it even accidentally they may be asked to leave.

Kato shouldn't need a flash with a digital but I'm still a manual focus 35mm kind of guy. Hopefully Stickman or Cuechick will check in with some tips. I may start a thread because I have questions also.

Kato
07-18-2002, 12:13 PM
See how helpful you'ze guys are. Wait until the techies pop on, these a the folks that will tell me how to do all this stuff.

Kato~~~going to lunch.

07-18-2002, 12:20 PM
My camera flashes at crazy times when left in auto flash mode, even outside daylight sometimes. The thing is, if you do set your dig camera to no flash mode, then you will have to adjust for the different lighting otherwise pictures will be funky hues. It'd be my luck I would have paid $200 for the seat and I'd accidentally let a flash go off and be booted out. Still it is a great opportunity the snap pics while a match is on by maintaining "no flash mode."

You are certainly correct that the flash shouldn't be needed. Jus' have to set up the camera for the conditions...sid

stickman
07-18-2002, 12:29 PM
I've never been to one of these events, but judging by what I've seen on TV it looks like lighting would not be a problem, especially on the televised matches. There is very large overhead lighting setup for these. I'm not sure what type of lighting this is, but if it alters the color, I'm sure it can be corrected in printing. My digital knowledge is somewhat limited. This all came after I got out of the business. My guess is that 400 speed film would work just fine, unless you are using a very long telephoto lenses with a small aperture. The pros often carry very long lenses that have a large aperture, but these are most often too expensive for the average hobbiest. If you are still short on light to shoot a reasonable shutter speed, you can set the film speed to 800 and have the film push processed at 800. You would have to shoot the whole roll of film this way. I would try to avoid this, however. The faster the film speed the grainier the results will be. It will be most notable if you should decide to make enlargements. I'll be glad to try to help with any questions you might have.

nAz
07-18-2002, 12:37 PM
Dude make sure you get a digi camera with a Flux capacitor /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif
this will allow to take pics. of all past tournys... ala back to the future

Rich R.
07-18-2002, 01:04 PM
The events I have attended only had good light for the televised matches. For earlier matches, it is just the lighting above the tables.
For film camers, I recommend getting the fastest film you can get. Kodak Royal Gold 1000 is very good. Also, Fugi 1600. If you have the choice, I like the Kodak better. Although a little slower than the Fugi, it has a much finer grain and the color is more accurate. JMHO.
Rich R.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-18-2002, 01:07 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Rich R.:</font><hr> The events I have attended only had good light for the televised matches. For earlier matches, it is just the lighting above the tables.
For film camers, I recommend getting the fastest film you can get. Kodak Royal Gold 1000 is very good. Also, Fugi 1600. If you have the choice, I like the Kodak better. Although a little slower than the Fugi, it has a much finer grain and the color is more accurate. JMHO.
Rich R. <hr></blockquote>

It's been a while since I used 1000. Has it improved? I always hated it. See my post to Stickman.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-18-2002, 01:09 PM
Howdy Stickman,

Thanks for checking in. I figured you'd have some good input.

I went to Valley Forge in 2000. I didn't take any shots until the TV matches on Sunday (I had put my batteries in upside-down on Friday /ccboard/images/icons/tongue.gif and it took me that long to figure out what was wrong). I use a 35mm w/ manual focus, manual aperture, automatic shutter speed. You're right, 400 speed film is perfect for the TV lights, even w/ a 200mm zoom lens my shots came out great.

I was thinking of going to the WPBA event in Peoria in August and definitely want to get some shots of the early rounds when the lighting is more subdued (It's about equivalent to home lighting or maybe a shade lower than office lighting). I think 1000 speed is out of the question. If I have to use that stuff I think I'll just wait for the TV matches /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif. Any suggestions?

heater451
07-18-2002, 01:50 PM
Digicameras tend to like bright, high-contrast shots, at least in the bottom end. However, they also don't fare well with 'hotspots' of light, such as a single, bright bulb in the shot--you may get some heavy, compensating shadows, where the camera tries to 'balance' out the shot. (I don't think having a strong light source facing the camera is a preferred set-up in any photography, but I've seen instances where film dealt with it much better.)

I haven't had any real experience with high-megapixel (4-up), high-$ stuff, but I'm betting that it will still have some lighting issues. On the other hand, I've seen some average 35mm shots, converted to CD at development time, that turned out very well.

Another thing, if you're wanting to get in tight close-ups, you'd be best off with a 35mm with a good lens set-up. Your average digicam isn't going to have a great optical zoom (achieved by lenses), and even a high-X digital zoom (achieved by pixel manipulation) is not going to be great.

Still, a digital camera may turn out shots that you are happy with, mine usually does (3-yr old Canon A10, 2.1 megapixel). If I'm unsatisfied with the results, I have Photoshop to fall back on! . . .

Taking two cameras is probably the better option, where you can immediately share the digital photos, but you have the film backup.

One more thing with a digicam--remember to manually turn the flash off, as most of them are probably used on 'auto', and will flash when they want.

================

Rich R.
07-18-2002, 01:51 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>It's been a while since I used 1000. Has it improved? I always hated it. See my post to Stickman. <hr></blockquote>
The Kodak Royal Gold is fairly good, considering the speed. The slower speeds of the Royal Gold are outstanding. For the lighting at Valley Forge and the DC Classic, 400 was just not be fast enough. Assuming similar lighting for the Open, I wouldn't use anything slower than 800 for early round play.
I have had some very good results with the Royal Gold 1000, but I wasn't really satisfied with the Fugi 1600. Unfortunately, I have been having a hard time getting the Royal Gold 1000, but it is worth the time and effort.
JMHO. Rich R.

Kato
07-18-2002, 01:55 PM
Heater, I just acquired Photoshop 7.0 which is supposed to be like the greatest thing ever. I'm sure I'll be able to touch up anything that isn't perfect.

Kato

stickman
07-18-2002, 02:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
Howdy Stickman,

Thanks for checking in. I figured you'd have some good input.

I went to Valley Forge in 2000. I didn't take any shots until the TV matches on Sunday (I had put my batteries in upside-down on Friday /ccboard/images/icons/tongue.gif and it took me that long to figure out what was wrong). I use a 35mm w/ manual focus, manual aperture, automatic shutter speed. You're right, 400 speed film is perfect for the TV lights, even w/ a 200mm zoom lens my shots came out great.

I was thinking of going to the WPBA event in Peoria in August and definitely want to get some shots of the early rounds when the lighting is more subdued (It's about equivalent to home lighting or maybe a shade lower than office lighting). I think 1000 speed is out of the question. If I have to use that stuff I think I'll just wait for the TV matches /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif. Any suggestions?


<hr></blockquote>

I wouldn't use 1000, or 1200. The quality suffers too much for my tastes. If I were going to try to get any pictures, in this lowered light situation, I would try to move in close and use a shorter focal length, with a larger aperture. If I wasn't able to do that, I would save my film for better shooting opportunies, unless you feel that a bad picture is better than none. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

stickman
07-18-2002, 02:42 PM
Kato, As I said, I'm not really up to speed on the digital stuff, but I do know that Photoshop 7.0 is the tool to use. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

stickman
07-18-2002, 02:59 PM
Rich R, Your knowledge of the fast films may be more current than mine. I haven't used any for quite a while and it may be better now than it was when I last used it. I did very little professionally with my 35mm. My experience with the fast films was primarily while photographing various events for my children while they were growing up. I was a portrait photographer and used a 6x7 camera with special portrait film. My portrait sessions normally allowed me complete control over the lighting, and I was able to use the same film in all situations.

Rich R.
07-18-2002, 03:17 PM
Stickman, I'm not as current with the fast films as I would like to be, but I have used some recently. I've never been a professional photographer, but I do have some experience with 35mm and action photography. I don't want to imply that you will get a beautiful, well lighted picture, with the fast films, but if you are careful, and wait until a player is at least partially under the table light, you can get some very good pictures. You have to use your film and your camera wisely.
I happen to like pictures of players, while they are playing, so I accept what I can get. I may expose a roll of film and only get a couple pictures that are good. That is the nature of action photography. If you prefer a picture of a player, standing in the hall, use a flash and get a better picture. It is a just matter of taste.
Rich R.

Barbara
07-18-2002, 03:35 PM
Kato,

Definitely check with Spiderman about settings and stuff for your camera. He absolutely dazzled my hubby with the bells and whistles and hints concerning a digital camera, that Pete's going to take the plunge and get one!

Barbara~~~Spiderman's a gadget guru...

JimS
07-18-2002, 05:40 PM
Kato, I'm gettin old and my memory......well.....let's say that I have senior moments. So...this being the case...If it was me planning this trip and thinking of photographing players I would get my automatic camera out RIGHT NOW...THIS INSTANT...BEFORE TURNING THE PAGE...AND SHUT THE FLASH OFF....NOW KATO...MOVE!!

Don't trust you memory when you're excited. How awfull would it be to do the flash thing at the US Open during a match!! Put a post-it note on the camera to remind you, stick duct tape over the flash....DO SOMETHING! /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

stickman
07-18-2002, 06:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Rich R.:</font><hr> Stickman, I'm not as current with the fast films as I would like to be, but I have used some recently. I've never been a professional photographer, but I do have some experience with 35mm and action photography. I don't want to imply that you will get a beautiful, well lighted picture, with the fast films, but if you are careful, and wait until a player is at least partially under the table light, you can get some very good pictures. You have to use your film and your camera wisely.
I happen to like pictures of players, while they are playing, so I accept what I can get. I may expose a roll of film and only get a couple pictures that are good. That is the nature of action photography. If you prefer a picture of a player, standing in the hall, use a flash and get a better picture. It is a just matter of taste.
Rich R. <hr></blockquote>

Rich, I like the action photos of the players as well. I may be too picky. /ccboard/images/icons/blush.gif If you go with the expectation of coming home with photos like you see in the magazines, you will be disappointed with the results from the fast film. If you go with expectations of something less, you may be happy. The thing to remember is that some of the lenses that the magazine photographers are using, often are in the $2500 and up price range. Most hobbiests don't have that type of equipment at their disposal.

Voodoo Daddy
07-18-2002, 07:06 PM
First of all &lt;laughing to himself&gt;, The seats I've choosen allow us not to be snookered by roaming camara-men, unlike the floor seats. We will have the same high veiw as the guys in the booth behind us {minus their video screens}. We'll see how unhappy he is with his seat come Sunday night. Secondly I will not sit in the eye of the camera in fear of breaking the deal I have with the FBI...opps...lmao!! Thirdly, I will wave many times to Mike M. because he does know the advantage of an isle seat..HAHAHAHA! Kato will get all pic's he wants of all the players he wants and no Rich R....he wont have to sit on my lap...dude, thats reserved for you!!

Rod
07-18-2002, 07:17 PM
Sid, I have a 3.4 Sony with an 6x optical zoom. Now that I see all of posts about pool pics I'll have to take mine to the pool room some time and expierment. I need to get educated before next year in Vegas. I still like my old AE1 pictures better. The good thing about digital is you can just keep erasing untill you get it right. Now where is that manual?

Rod
07-18-2002, 07:21 PM
Kato, I'm happy for you and Voodoo. Hope you have a great time, like I have no doubt you will. We will be expecting photos, before and after of the remains! lol

Rod
07-18-2002, 07:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Kato:</font><hr> Heater, I just acquired Photoshop 7.0 which is supposed to be like the greatest thing ever. I'm sure I'll be able to touch up anything that isn't perfect.

Kato <hr></blockquote>

Kato, humm how did you just acquire 7.0? I need more friends in higher places. BTW have you bought a digital yet?

stickman
07-18-2002, 08:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: heater451:</font><hr> I haven't had any real experience with high-megapixel (4-up), high-$ stuff, but I'm betting that it will still have some lighting issues. On the other hand, I've seen some average 35mm shots, converted to CD at development time, that turned out very well.

<hr></blockquote>

I'd love to have the use of some of the professional digital stuff, but the cost is unreal. A new Canon EOS 1 D is $5500 without any accessories!!! Wow!!! A high quality Epson printer is another $5000 investment. My cheap digital will just have to do for now. LOL

Kato
07-18-2002, 08:40 PM
7.0? I've got friends I guess.

I haven't bought a digital but I'm dragging my techno dork buddy JackPot to the computer show this weekend and we're buying one.

Kato

07-18-2002, 08:53 PM
Kato, I can't afford $200 for seats. Can I sit on your lap? /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif I promise not to wiggle too much. (Unless you're into that...) LOL

Rich R.
07-19-2002, 05:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: stickman:</font><hr>
Rich, I like the action photos of the players as well. I may be too picky. /ccboard/images/icons/blush.gif If you go with the expectation of coming home with photos like you see in the magazines, you will be disappointed with the results from the fast film. If you go with expectations of something less, you may be happy. The thing to remember is that some of the lenses that the magazine photographers are using, often are in the $2500 and up price range. Most hobbiests don't have that type of equipment at their disposal. <hr></blockquote>
Stickman, I agree, the lenses used by magazine photographers are out of reach for most. However, what they also have are custom labs and hand processing that most of us also do not have. They can do things in the lab to make an average photo look great.
Believe me, some of the pictures I have taken are not too shabby. Although my equipment has a lot of years and mileage on it, it is all Nikon and does a good job. At Valley Forge, I sat as close as possible to the action and used a 105mm lens and got some very acceptable pictures. If I had access to custom processing, by a good technician, they would be magazine quality.
I assure you, with 400 or slower film, at the tournaments I have been at, you will have to shoot too slow for good results. You will most likely be at 1/4 second or longer exposure time and color film does some funny things when you shoot that slow. With 1000, you can shoot fast enough to get decent results. I have enlarged some to 8x10 and the grain is not bad at all with the Royal Gold.
I have to believe that professional photographers are also using fast films to shoot under these conditions. The high priced lenses can only help so much to compensate for low light.
JMHO. Rich R.

Rich R.
07-19-2002, 05:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Voodoo Daddy:</font><hr> Rich R....he wont have to sit on my lap...dude, thats reserved for you!! <hr></blockquote>
Until we meet Voodoo, you will have to take my word for it. You do not want me sitting in your lap. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif
Rich R.~~~also likes isle seats. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

stickman
07-19-2002, 08:18 AM
The 1000 speed film must be better than I remember, and I say that without meaning to be a smart aleck. After all it has been probably a little over ten years since I shot any. Your 105mm Nikon lens is probably an F2.8 or better. You were able to get good quality because you were able to get close enough to use a shorter focal length lens with a good size aperture. You're right, the pro with the 200mm F2 lense has little advantage, except to shoot from farther away. The problems arise when the guy in the cheap seats puts the X2 extention on his zoom lense, and trys for some good closeups. LOL He's probably shooting wide open at F7. 1000 speed film won't help him.

SpiderMan
07-19-2002, 08:27 AM
If you are using a digital and set the internal flash to not fire, it's a good idea to put a piece of masking tape over the strobe "just in case". Most cameras will revert to a standard mode if they turn themselves off after a period of non-use, and then you may forget to re-do the settings when you turn it back on.

SpiderMan

Rich R.
07-19-2002, 08:35 AM
I suggest you get a roll of the Kodak Royal Gold 1000 and try it. It may be hard to find. I think you will be very surprised at the results.
I'm not sure off the top, but I think the 105m is an f2.5 and it is very good quality. Being close is a must with the low light situation, even with the fast film. Film slower than 800, just is not good enough. IMHO.
The guy in the cheap seats with the extention may as well wait for magazine coverage and pictures. LOL.
I will be in the cheap seats for the U.S. Open, because I am only staying a couple of days, and I don't think I will be taking my camera. It will not be worth it. However, at the last minute, I may just carry it along. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif
Rich R.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-19-2002, 08:48 AM
http://www.aaacamera.com/kodak_film_royal_gold_100024.html

http://www.photo-co.com/securestore/c59969.2.html

I'm definitely gonna try a roll or two before the tournament.

SpiderMan
07-19-2002, 01:53 PM
Rod,

Remember, all those pictures I took of you and your friends
were taken in a dimly-lit bar with no flash. Give it a
try! But if you're not sure of your settings, take at
least one shot with your finger covering the strobe, just
in case!

SpiderMan

07-19-2002, 02:19 PM
Yes... 7.00 Lunch Buffet, Gourmet style and 10.00 nightly Gourmet food.. The food is GREAT! Glad to see the excitement building, my father and I will be at the trade show next week making our sponsor decissions..Anyway, cant wait to see you'll at the 2002 U.S.Open!

Thanks Brady

ALSO, THOSE WHO CANT ATTEND.....
BCn to DISH out U. S. Open LIVE
The 27th Annual 9-Ball Championship Final Match available on PPV



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"This is an excellent opportunity for the pool and billiard marketplace to step forward and send a clear message that pool deserves to be on TV more often," said Rob Sykora, president of BCn. "Sponsors and advertisers will show more interest in the sport if this event proves to be successful. Besides, the U. S. Open deserves a live broadcast, so we're putting it on a main stage during prime time."

Promoter Barry Behrman echoes the sentiment, "The U. S. Open of any sport deserves to be in the limelight, especially after 27 years of building the event to such a prestigious level. Sports fans who have never been to a pool tournament can now get a front row seat to the biggest event of the year."

Accu-Stats Video Productions of Butler, New Jersey will provide its billiard production expertise to the event and deliver the digital signal for the satellite uplink.

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For more detailed information about the U. S. Open and potential sponsorship opportunities, contact BCn at 1-866-774-8770. Information and updates can also be found at www.billiardclubtv.com. (http://www.billiardclubtv.com.)

DISH Network is a trademark of EchoStar Communications Corporation. DISH Network is EchoStar's state-of-the-art direct broadcast satellite TV system that is capable of offering over 500 channels of digital video and CD-quality audio programming, as well as fully MPEG-2/DVB compliant hardware and installation. EchoStar is included in the Nasdaq-100 Index (NDX) which contains the largest non-financial companies on the NASDAQ Stock Market. DISH Network currently serves over 7.16 million customers. To order a DISH Network system, call 1-800-333-DISH (3474) or visit www.dishnetwork.com (http://www.dishnetwork.com)


BCn is a national network of billiard clubs, poolrooms, and sports bars that join together to promote pool by featuring Billiard Club television as their in-house video entertainment. BCtv features match footage, instructional segments, and other entertainment including video footage from Affiliates Clubs in the network. BCtv is a production of BCn and is sponsored in part by Accu-Stats, the American Poolplayers Association, Aramith Belgian Billiard Balls, Billiards.com, Billiards Digest, Iwan Simonis, Lucasi Cues, and Matchroom Sport.

To find out more about BCn call 1-866-774-8770 or visit our website at www.billiardclubtv.com. (http://www.billiardclubtv.com.)

Rod
07-19-2002, 02:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Kato:</font><hr> 7.0? I've got friends I guess.

I haven't bought a digital but I'm dragging my techno dork buddy JackPot to the computer show this weekend and we're buying one.

Kato <hr></blockquote>

If your techno dork buddy knows, that's great. I would look up some reviews before I bought one. My Sony is a great camera and has 6x optical zoom, optical is important. However one thing I overlooked was replacement lenses. Wide angle telephoto etc. I can not change the original, I have to buy slip over lenses for the effect. There just not as clear. Just thought I'd mention that part. Of course it does depend on how many $$ you care to spend.

07-20-2002, 10:43 AM
There are a couple of excellent websites specializing in digital camera reviews. I don't remember the names or URLs, but a little searching should dig them up. Enjoy!