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ericchen0121
12-07-2006, 10:17 AM
A lot has been said about your dominant eye, ie. putting your cue under your dominant eye vs under your chin.

Well, since I started playing pool (4 years ago) I have put my cue under my right, dominant eye. However, it's not merely significant that I do this. The interesting part is that I'm mainly closing my left eye, so the MAIN (I'd say 85-95%) of my visual information is coming from my dominant right eye.

I don't know of any other pros that do this, or have I seen any other players do this.

I know Neils Feijin puts his cue under his dominant right eye (see his gallery on http://www.nielsfeijen.nl/) and it appears he opens his right eye a bit more than the left at times.

I hope this may give some valuable case study to the field of billiards and, for that matter, optical research.

dr_dave
12-07-2006, 10:25 AM
Dominant eye discussions are a perrenial topic around here. To read some of the past highlights, see the links under "aiming" under "dominant eye" here (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/threads.html).

Regards,
Dr. Dave
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ericchen0121:</font><hr> A lot has been said about your dominant eye, ie. putting your cue under your dominant eye vs under your chin.

Well, since I started playing pool (4 years ago) I have put my cue under my right, dominant eye. However, it's not merely significant that I do this. The interesting part is that I'm mainly closing my left eye, so the MAIN (I'd say 85-95%) of my visual information is coming from my dominant right eye.

I don't know of any other pros that do this, or have I seen any other players do this.

I know Neils Feijin puts his cue under his dominant right eye (see his gallery on http://www.nielsfeijen.nl/) and it appears he opens his right eye a bit more than the left at times.

I hope this may give some valuable case study to the field of billiards and, for that matter, optical research.

<hr /></blockquote>

pooltchr
12-07-2006, 10:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ericchen0121:</font><hr> The interesting part is that I'm mainly closing my left eye, so the MAIN (I'd say 85-95%) of my visual information is coming from my dominant right eye.
<hr /></blockquote>

Doesn't that create a challenge with your depth perception?
Steve

maxmillion
12-09-2006, 03:10 AM
Yeah, I play the same.. I put the cue about 2 tip widths to the right of centre of my chin..

Gayle in MD
12-09-2006, 06:31 AM
Karen Corr, always shoots with her cue stick, under her right eye. I used to try to line as as Allison does, until I met Karen. I am severely right eye dominant, and changing over to line my cue up under my right eye, has made a tremendous difference in improving my aim. There are a number of pro players, who definately line up for their dominant eye. One, (can't think of her name at present) short brown hair, from England, and former snooker player, is right handed, but left eye dominant, you can see she turns her head, and even somwhat, her body, to favor her dominant eye.

Gayle in Md.

jjinfla
12-09-2006, 06:49 AM
You bend over the cue and the body automatically lines up your eyes the way it should. If it doesn't then you should not play pool.

Jake

randyg
12-09-2006, 07:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jjinfla:</font><hr> You bend over the cue and the body automatically lines up your eyes the way it should. If it doesn't then you should not play pool.

Jake <hr /></blockquote>


Well stated...randyg

Gayle in MD
12-09-2006, 07:34 AM
Gee, I'm glad I didn't read this post of yours when I was a beginner, eight years ago, or I would never have come as far as I have. I would, perhaps, have given up. In my case, I became addicted to pool, late in life. I was in my fifties, the first time I ever had a cue in my hand. My interest in the game, was fueled by my complete lack of any natural ability for it, something that was unusual for me in the context of athletics, hand-eye coordination, rhythm, dexterity, and even aim. While I don't consider myself an expert, I've come a long long way from where I began.

When it comes to building ability for pool, in my experience as a student of the game, atleast, there are two kinds of students. Two completely different experiences. One, being those folks who grew up shooting pool. They were fortunate, to have come to such a great sport, while still young enough to have that natural, instinctive, uncluttered approach indicative of youth. Those folks, IMO, have an edge of advantage over those who come to the game later in life.

Those of us who became addicted to this sport later in life, must accept that our improvment will be wrought with struggle, trial and error, failure, intimidation, embarrassment, physical training, study both on and off the table, and a committment to loads of practice. Suffice to say, I was a natural athlete, until I picked up a pool cue. My aim, stance and stroke, were neither natural, or consistant. That is no long true. My game improved through lessons, but also through my own personal experimentation. One proved to be as vluable as the other. Where to line up my cue, in my case, was one aspect of the learning process which required experimentation on my own, it certainly did not come naturally. It is now, however, no longer an issue.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
Gayle in Md.

Sid_Vicious
12-09-2006, 10:42 AM
You have me wondering a bit now because that was "my take" today, but back when I actually opened a pool instructional booklet, or even heard about the dominant eye, I'm not sure what I was seeing at drop and aim. IMO, the dominant eye comes more into the picture for which eye controls the line of the shot. I believe that Randy will agree that you look with both eyes, and many players at elementary levels want to shut down much of the non dominant vision and sight mostly with one eye. Just as you said, the head finds it's place over the cue, and then it is also a natural for the 2-eye focus to control how the dominant eye levels out for seeing the shot, and the whole table properly. This happens as natural as the head finding it's position if you just let it happen on it's owm, assuming you have not developed a forced squint over the time you've already put into the game. Jm2c...sid

randyg
12-09-2006, 11:36 AM
Randy agrees with Sid.

Sid_Vicious
12-09-2006, 12:31 PM
One thing I remember you saying was, "You can tell if the player is going to miss by watching his eyse." Says everything many, many times...sid

wolfdancer
12-09-2006, 01:03 PM
The interesting part is that I'm mainly closing my left eye, so the MAIN (I'd say 85-95%) of my visual information is coming from my dominant right eye. <font color="blue">I'd have guessed 100 % </font color>
I don't know of any other pros that do this...
<font color="blue"> becoming a pro yourself, after only playing for 4 yrs is remarkable </font color>
I hope this may give some valuable case study to the field of billiards and, for that matter, optical research.
<font color="blue"> maybe you play good despite closing one eye?
I think it would take more then one player squinting, to advance research....Cheney closes one eye when bird-hunting, and as good as he is, ole GWB won't hunt with him </font color>