PDA

View Full Version : How to straighten my stroke



Shaft
12-27-2006, 02:20 PM
I did not ask for it, but my wife got me a laser cue for Christmas. (I was already using a bottle, and I would not have chosen this particular cue, but I appreciate her trying!)

Lo, it does show my stroke swerves a bit - right to left - as the tip approaches the cue ball. (One advantage to the laser cue is that subtle effects are MAGNIFIED when the laser is projected on a WALL.) The more I try to straighten it out, the more erratic my stroke looks.

I think the answer is better alignment between my bridge hand, shoulder and elbow.

Any suggestions on how to conquer this?

randyg
12-27-2006, 03:26 PM
First off, the two worst tools that I have ever seen for stroke practice is a bottle and the laser in the cue. Try to find an SPF Instructor and take an two hour stroke lesson......SPF=randyg

DeadCrab
12-27-2006, 04:28 PM
The question is, are the "magnified effects on the wall" significant.

I would think that if you made a dead center hit on the cue ball, perpendicular to a rail a few feet away, and the cue ball returned to the site of the original impact, then you've got a good stroke.

cushioncrawler
12-27-2006, 04:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Shaft:</font><hr> I did not ask for it, but my wife got me a laser cue for Christmas. (I was already using a bottle, and I would not have chosen this particular cue, but I appreciate her trying!) Lo, it does show my stroke swerves a bit - right to left - as the tip approaches the cue ball. (One advantage to the laser cue is that subtle effects are MAGNIFIED when the laser is projected on a WALL.) The more I try to straighten it out, the more erratic my stroke looks. I think the answer is better alignment between my bridge hand, shoulder and elbow. Any suggestions on how to conquer this? <hr /></blockquote>
A lazerq sounds great to me -- duz the light shine throo a hole at the tip?? -- i made one like that for myself years ago, using an ordinary globe but, uzing a hollow steel cue -- the light was so weak that it only "worked" in the dark. A few questions....

1... When u say that it showed that your cueing action had a bit of right-to-left in it, i am wondering how your basic aim was, ie when motionless -- do u tend to aim further left than u think?? -- or do u tend to aim too far right. Koz, i reckon that a "straight-cueing-action" will only be ok for u if u have a "straight-aim" in the first place. Its like i allwayz say -- if your aim iz bent, then your cue needs to be bent, or, your stroke hazta be bent.

2... Why not uze the lazerq to check other player's aims and strokes?? Especially some champs that u admire. I reckon that u will see that some champs have a very bent aim and a very bent action (they go together). Duznt mean that the lazerq will not help u -- but it will highlight the complexity (or the simplicity) of the whole deal.

3... Lazerq sounds like about the best training aid i have heard of -- how much do they cost?? Do the instructions and claims that come with it make any sense?? Is it any good for anything other than a wall?? madMac.

Stretch
12-27-2006, 05:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr> The question is, are the "magnified effects on the wall" significant.

I would think that if you made a dead center hit on the cue ball, perpendicular to a rail a few feet away, and the cue ball returned to the site of the original impact, then you've got a good stroke. <hr /></blockquote>

Exactly right deadcrab. Only a few feet away is not much of a test. Try going the length of the table from diamond to opposite diamond and back. First at lag weight, then harder, use different bridges. If your like me, that tendency to hook to the left only shows up on shots i hit hard. So test yourself and make adjustments by playing hard shots and observing. You can also see the cueball on most stop shots and note in which direction the ball is spinning to indicate weather your stroking centre ball or not on the cb.

Of course professional instruction on fundamentals is NEVER a bad idea, even for accomplished players. It seems that time and natural laziness eventually leads to bad habits then before you know it something is out of whack that is now, unfortunately, "habit". St.

Shaft
12-28-2006, 07:14 AM
CC: Here are my ***answers*** to your questions:

A lazerq sounds great to me -- duz the light shine throo a hole at the tip??

***These cues are advertised on most billiard supply websites. Both cues I have seen on the market work this way. This happens to be the one with the cross-hair pattern, not the dot.***

1... When u say that it showed that your cueing action had a bit of right-to-left in it, i am wondering how your basic aim was, ie when motionless -- do u tend to aim further left than u think?? -- or do u tend to aim too far right. Koz, i reckon that a "straight-cueing-action" will only be ok for u if u have a "straight-aim" in the first place. Its like i allwayz say -- if your aim iz bent, then your cue needs to be bent, or, your stroke hazta be bent.

*** Hmmm. I think I am aiming stright, but I'll look into that. I would want to aim straight and to stroke straight if possible. I am noticing a bit of left English when I do my rail drills, even though (I think) I am hitting dang close to the center of the ball. I could be compensating. ****

2... Why not uze the lazerq to check other player's aims and strokes?? Especially some champs that u admire. I reckon that u will see that some champs have a very bent aim and a very bent action (they go together). Duznt mean that the lazerq will not help u -- but it will highlight the complexity (or the simplicity) of the whole deal.

*** Interesting point. For exammple, who knows "how straight" Mosconi's strokes or Crane's stokes really were, or if they just knew how to compensate. But how in the world would I check the straightness of Effren Rayes' stroke? ***

3... Lazerq sounds like about the best training aid i have heard of -- how much do they cost?? Do the instructions and claims that come with it make any sense?? Is it any good for anything other than a wall?? madMac.
<hr /></blockquote>

*** The dot version goes for about $100 and includes extra tips; the cross-hair version goes for about $150. Both come with spare batteries. As far as I know, they make no claims other than allowing you to see movement in your stroke. If they make any claim beyond this, I don't believe it. All they can provide is visual feedback; improvement is up to the player. The instructions don't say you have to shine it on a wall (it is intended to shine on the cue ball) -- I just noticed I can see my swerve "magnified" if I project the laser image to a distance further away than the cue ball, like onto a wall.

Rail drills are the proof of when you have it right, but they don't help diagnose what is going wrong in the stroke if you get it wrong: rail drills don't show if the tip was swinging or if the aim is a bit off-center.***

Billy_Bob
12-28-2006, 08:13 AM
Tip: Your shoulder/upper arm can move any which way!

Repeat: Your shoulder/upper arm can move any which way!

Your elbow is like a hinge, it can only move one direction.

With that said, keep your upper arm up and in a fixed position. Then move just your lower arm like a pendulum forwards/backwards. Watch how many of the better players/pros stroke. They keep their upper arm up while stroking.

There is a *lot* more to it than just this, but that is a good start.

Many people have bad habits when stroking (including myself). You can't see what you are doing when you are stroking. I think the best thing is to go to a BCA certified instructor or a pro instructor with a friend that you frequently play with.

Then both of you get lessons on stroking. After this, when you are playing, you can tell the other person when they are not doing what they should be doing, and they can tell you when you are not doing what you should be doing.

Again, you can't see what you are doing when stroking. So you need someone else to watch you.

Also good to videotape yourself and play it back in slow motion. See what you are doing when you miss shots.

The best videos on stroke I have seen are from the Billiard Sanctuary Academy of the Cueing Arts. These go into extreme detail. They are expensive, but you get what you pay for...

(Click on "The Foundation Series")
http://www.billiardsanctuary.com

randyg
12-28-2006, 09:19 AM
Thanks Billy-Bob, that is a good set of videos....randyg

killerstroke
12-28-2006, 10:22 AM
I have done it and personally like the instructo idea, but if that is not possible follow the teachings of Bert Kinister. The mighty "X" is a good place to start. Straight in shots - Follow the ball into the pocket, draw it straight back into a pocket and stun the CB to replace the OB. Send him an email I'm sure he has something to help you. He has done wonders for my stroke and game.

randyg
12-28-2006, 11:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote killerstroke:</font><hr> I have done it and personally like the instructo idea, but if that is not possible follow the teachings of Bert Kinister. The mighty "X" is a good place to start. Straight in shots - Follow the ball into the pocket, draw it straight back into a pocket and stun the CB to replace the OB. Send him an email I'm sure he has something to help you. He has done wonders for my stroke and game. <hr /></blockquote>

Good drill but that drill will not correct any stroke problems.....SPF=randyg

FatsRedux
12-28-2006, 02:38 PM
Here's my advice, FWIW:

1.) Ditch the ol' lazer cue.

2.) Mark off a straight line from one short rail to the opposite short rail. Using a chalk cube, mark your aim point on the opposite rail. Shoot straight down the line at the chalk cube using dead center ball and medium (lag) speed. Use a full and fluid follow through so that the tip comes to rest on the table about 6" from the spot previously occupied by the cue ball. Once the tip comes to rest.. FREEZE, and observe the path of the cueball off the rail. If it comes straight back and hits the tip of your cue, you hit it perfectly with a good straight stroke. Anything other than a pure straight stroke will cause the cueball to go wide of the intended rebound path. Do this for 20-30 minutes as part of a purposeful systematic and regular practice regimen and it will help you.

3.) If your schedule and finances permit it, find and work with a qualified instructor.

The instructor should make a video of you to point out the flaws in your game and then work with you to eliminate those flaws.

If you really love the game, and want to get to your personal best level, the money spent on an instructor is a great investment.

Hope this helps,
Fats

killerstroke
12-29-2006, 07:59 AM
I believe there may be many more reasons but two of the main things shooting down a straight line does. It programs your mind to picture the straight line and know what is a straight shot to your desired aiming spot no matter the shot you are taking. When shooting the OB into the pocket you know if you made it, and you get to see the reaction of the CB. If shooting a stun, the CB should just roll over and replace the CB. It is my opinion this shot will teach and take a pool player more places than any other shot. If shooting a follow or draw the results would be to have the CB follow the line. Using the CB with the spots helps a great deal to see if the CB is actually spinning correctly.

ceebee
12-29-2006, 09:52 AM
There are lots of Training Aids on the market, for Pool N Billiards. Some of them work very well.

However, it's still a good idea to learn from an Instructor, what you are trying to accomplish, before getting assistance from the at-home Training Aids. Developing an incorrect physical motion (and your muscle memory to go with it) is detrimental.

After you have built-in a few bad habits, especially for a long period of time, you will significantly limit your abilities to play well.

Unlearning is much more difficult, for your muscle memory, than learning correctly, up front.

Sig
12-29-2006, 06:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> First off, the two worst tools that I have ever seen for stroke practice is a bottle and the laser in the cue. Try to find an SPF Instructor and take an two hour stroke lesson......SPF=randyg <hr /></blockquote>

Randy, why do you say stroking in a bottle is so bad? I'm sure it's not sufficient, but is it detrimental?

pooltchr
12-29-2006, 08:24 PM
A proper pendilum stroke will not allow the cue to travel straight through the neck of the bottle. If your stroke is right, your cue should make contact with the bottom edge of the neck of the bottle before you have finished your stroke.
Steve

randyg
12-30-2006, 07:13 AM
To continue on, the "bottle" method causes your elbow to drop right before impact. "Keeping your cue level all the time" is immposible.......SPF=randyg

Shaft
12-31-2006, 09:12 AM
Agreed, Steve. I recognize that the mechanics of a pendulum swing will cause an up and down movement in the tip, so that movement has not bothered me (as long as I hit the cue ball where I wanted to).

I also recognize and agree with everyone's advice to get a BCA certified instructor. I have checked the BCA website and the closest guy lives an hour away. (But, what do I really know about him? I'll let you know how that goes.)

In the mean time, and between lessons, I will use training aids that give me more informative feedback than simply a missed shot (including missed bank drills). The video camera sounds like something to play with.

randyg
12-31-2006, 12:28 PM
Shaft: What City do you live in???randyg

markabbate
12-31-2006, 03:01 PM
I would try different stances. I tried a frontal stance and this corrected stroke problems. Try different tightness of grip. some players use wrist some players hold cue tightly but firmly as if they are picking the cue up off the table. some players bend bridge arm and lean weight on it etc etc.

hope that helps

Shaft
01-01-2007, 09:00 AM
Randyg asked where I live. I live in New Orleans, and the closest BCA certified instructor is Tom Landry in Abbeville, La. (2 hrs away, not 1, my mistake).

randyg
01-01-2007, 10:41 AM
I have a Pool School scheduled in Homa, La. this Fall. Interested?????randyg

Shaft
01-01-2007, 03:56 PM
I can certainly get to Houma.
I am interested, but I am not familiar with pool school:
What is covered? How long is it? How much does it cost? When this fall?

Jal
01-02-2007, 12:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Shaft:</font><hr>...I think the answer is better alignment between my bridge hand, shoulder and elbow.

Any suggestions on how to conquer this? <hr /></blockquote>For a swoopless stroke, the "plane" in which your entire shooting arm resides must be aligned with the vertical plane intersecting the long axis of your cue stick. It can be misaligned in two ways: by having it rotated about the long axis of the stick (ie, not vertical), or about a vertical axis perpendicular to the stick (ie, at some angle with respect to the long axis of the stick). In the first case the laser dot will move back and forth along a straight line inclined to the vertical. In the second, it will follow a curved path (sinusoidal) inclined to the vertical with the beginning and end points separated horizontally from each other.

So you should be able to analyze your stroke from the path of the dot if you can distinguish between the above alignment deviations. It would probably help to project the dot on a phosphorescent screen with a visible persistence of a quarter second or so, in order to clearly see any curve. But finding one that'll respond to your laser's wavelength (I assume it's red), or the equivalent pigment, paint or plastic, and with the right persistence, isn't so easy.

Putting that aside, and assuming you shoot right handed and that your wrist and grip are stable throughout, I think you should be able to tell what adjustments need to made from the following.

If the dot moves along a straight line but the line is inclined to the left of vertical, then your grip hand is too far out away from your body (ie, your forearm is not in a vertical plane, yielding a sidearm motion). If the line is to the right of vertical, then your hand is too close.

If the dot follows a curved path to the left of vertical, then your elbow is too close to your body, or perhaps more accurately, your body is too close to your elbow for its particular orientaion with respect to the stick (ie, how open or closed your stance is). This means that your upper arm is not parallel to the long axis of the stick. If the dot goes to the right, then your elbow is too far from your body.

You may have a combination of the above. If so, it'll probably be better to adjust your elbow first to eliminate the curvature in the path.

You might be introducing things during the stroke itself, as opposed to a faulty initial alignment. You might have to concentrate at first on keeping everything still except for your forearm.

If you can distinguish a straight path from a curved one without the aid of a special screen (look for the horizontal separation of the end points), or manage to find or make one, your wife's gift could be very useful.

Jim

mworkman
01-02-2007, 12:48 PM
I drew a straight line down the length of the table. It is very hard for me to get it to come back to hit my stick consistantly. It ussually comes back a couple inches to the right. I'm still able to make long straight in shots because I think I'm hitting them at a speed which the deflection and throw cancel each other out.

I will fix this problem and get rid of my unwanted right english. Just wondering how long it will take? I've been doing it wrong for about 10 years now. I would imagine it will take a while to correct?

cushioncrawler
01-02-2007, 02:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> I drew a straight line down the length of the table. It is very hard for me to get it to come back to hit my stick consistantly. It ussually comes back a couple inches to the right. I'm still able to make long straight in shots because I think I'm hitting them at a speed which the deflection and throw cancel each other out. I will fix this problem and get rid of my unwanted right english. Just wondering how long it will take? I've been doing it wrong for about 10 years now. I would imagine it will take a while to correct? <hr /></blockquote>
Duz the qball hit the cushion too far left, with righthand spin?? Are u left-handed?? If yes and yes, then i suggest uzing a cue with a left-hand bend. If the cue haz a right-hand bend, then turn it over -- actually uzing the bend "to the right" might be even better. U can "bend" your cue by putting a tapered-washer or something in the join.

If u are right-handed then a bent cue mightnt help. But, u could try pushing the cue towards the right, into your bridge, during the whole stroke. This shood be eezy if u uze an 0-bridge (loop), but would be allmost impossible if u uze a V-bridge.

A longer bridge (ie 14") or shorter bridge (6") might help.

Theze 3 tricks allow u to uze your uzual aim and stroke (nearnuff). Failing that, u might try mooving your aim a bit to the left. U can do this by mooving (leaning) the bridge a bit (1mm ??) to the left just before u shoot. Or u can do this by mooving the back-hand to the right at some stage. Didnt work??, ok try mooving the aim to the left -- u would think that this would make things worse, but it aint necessarily so.

U can uze some or all of theze four suggestions -- or, az i said, u can try doing the exact opposite (might be even better).

Other than theze four cheap-shot suggestions, i suppoze that u would need to try some of the hints of Fran &amp; Co -- u never know, might help things, worth a go az a last rezort i guess, stranger thingz have happened.

Hey!! -- If the bent cue stuff helps, which it will, tell everyone. U will be the first person in the USA to come out of the closet. In fact, i reckon that allmost everyone shood be uzing a slightly bent cue (or a very bent cue). Bent cues will make a bigger impact on the cue bizness than what oversize metal drivers did to golf. We will look back on the old days and laugh. Magazines and blogs will come to life, everyone talking about this amazing new development. Players will be sending back new cues koz they "straightened up too much" during shipping. madMac.

davenelson
01-03-2007, 09:42 AM
I got this from Jerry Briesath.
Put the cue ball on the spot. Set up a shot. Any shot will do, I like a straight in stop shot.
Shoot it, stay down, freeze. Look at the shaft. It should be directly over the dot in the middle of the spot. Simple, and no special equipment required.
If I am going to cue the ball repeatedly from a spot during practice I mark that spot with the inch color code discs that you can get at any office supply store. They remove easily and do not seem to leave a residue on the cloth. To mark a ball position I use the paper reinforce donuts. One writer recommended the transparent plastic ones. I tried them and found them very hard to remove. So hard that I think they might damage the cloth.

Dave Nelson

DickLeonard
01-03-2007, 11:29 AM
Shaft I use to think there was a way to create a straight stroke but after watching the inhabitants from the Philippines shoot pool all that instructions went out with the Garbage.

I would love to tape for a TV Show the Famed Instructors around a large conference table and a large TV screen analyzing Efren's stroke. Then work their way down the list.####

Jal
01-03-2007, 02:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> I drew a straight line down the length of the table. It is very hard for me to get it to come back to hit my stick consistantly. It ussually comes back a couple inches to the right. I'm still able to make long straight in shots because I think I'm hitting them at a speed which the deflection and throw cancel each other out.<hr /></blockquote>The method you and others cited for testing your stroke is a very good one. But I think the laser cue is potentially better because it eliminates a couple of variables unrelated to stroke. How do you know, for instance, that you're lined up for centerball, and if so, that you're actually aiming perpendicular to the cushion? Having a line down the table is good, but there are limitations as to how accurately you can aim down that line. With the laser device you get direct feedback on your stroke, and nothing but your stroke.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr>I will fix this problem and get rid of my unwanted right english. Just wondering how long it will take? I've been doing it wrong for about 10 years now. I would imagine it will take a while to correct? <hr /></blockquote>I wouldn't venture a guess.

Jim

Sig
01-05-2007, 08:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> I drew a straight line down the length of the table. It is very hard for me to get it to come back to hit my stick consistantly. It ussually comes back a couple inches to the right. I'm still able to make long straight in shots because I think I'm hitting them at a speed which the deflection and throw cancel each other out. <hr /></blockquote>

I have trouble with this drill as well. One thing I've noticed recently is that I might be standing too close to my cue, possibly causing the stroke to be coming in at an angle. I don't think it's due to unwanted english, or at least it's not the only reason. I tried standing a little further off to the side, which seems to help. I need to have an instructor take a look at it.

DickLeonard
01-05-2007, 08:49 AM
Shaft I would always shoot down the dividing line on your kitchen of dining room. You will save a lot of money practicing your stroke and no one knows a thing about your trying to improve your stroke.

This is the guaranteed straightest stroke you can have. Just be mindful that most of the great players had anything nearing the straight stroke.

If your shoulder,elbow and wrist/hand form a 90 degree angle. Hold your cue with your ring and baby finger and the crotch of your thumb and fingers letting your thumb and index and middle finger dangle towards the floor. Now stroke forward when your hand nears 90Degrees let your thumb and index finger guide your cue. Your thumb should end up pointing forward on the top of the cue. Your index finger along side it keeping your cue on a straight path.

This is the one way that I found that I could always stroke dead straight. Once you hold the cue with your fingers gripping the cue, many new cue paths are developed each one creating a new solution. You know how Golfers dread the Shank well poolplayers have the same disease where they contort their stroke when they are about to hit the cueball. If you notice a player with that affliction you are advised to look away. That is more infectious than Bird Flu.
Give it a try.####

davenelson
01-05-2007, 06:11 PM
I'm a pretty lousy pool player. In our continuing round robin straight pool tournament I share the bottom with 2 others. And yet, I have no problem with the drill of shooting the cue ball down the length of the table and have it come back and hit the cue tip. I owe this to the method I mentioned earlier. I shoot the cue ball from a spot. After the hit I look at the shaft. Is the shaft directly over the center of the spot where the shot started? If it is, the cue ball is going to come back to the cue tip. If it isn't, you know where you went wrong.

Dave Nelson

davenelson
01-06-2007, 07:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sig:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> I drew a straight line down the length of the table. It is very hard for me to get it to come back to hit my stick consistantly. It ussually comes back a couple inches to the right. I'm still able to make long straight in shots because I think I'm hitting them at a speed which the deflection and throw cancel each other out. <hr /></blockquote>

I have trouble with this drill as well. One thing I've noticed recently is that I might be standing too close to my cue, possibly causing the stroke to be coming in at an angle. I don't think it's due to unwanted english, or at least it's not the only reason. I tried standing a little further off to the side, which seems to help. I need to have an instructor take a look at it. <hr /></blockquote>

I am not a very good player. In our continuing round robin straight pool matches I share the bottom with 2 others. Yet, I have no trouble with this drill. I also have drawn a center line down the length of the table. I put a donut on the point on that line that I wish to shoot from, about 3/4 the length of the table. I take care to see that I hit on the vertical center of the ball. Shoot, stay down, freeze, check the shaft. If the shaft is over the center of the donut the ball will come back and hit the tip.

Dave Nelson

davenelson
01-06-2007, 09:03 AM
Testing. Somtimes my posts show up and sometimes they don't. What could I be doing wrong? Lets see if this one makes it.

Dave Nelson

mworkman
01-06-2007, 10:07 AM
I've been getting better at this drill (using a straight line) and comming back to tip. I think my improvement is comming from a more relaxed grip. I'm not there yet, but it is something I will do at the biginning of each practice session. I've noticed my stop shots are getting a lot tighter also.

Berznarf
01-15-2007, 06:54 PM
Hi all, this is my first post here after lurking for about a month or so.

While there have been many good suggestions in this thread, there is one thing I noticed that is lacking. Make certain that your head is aligned correctly with your aim. If your face was flat, that plane should be exactly perpendicular to the line on which you plan to shoot.

At the hall at which I play, each table has a line from the spot to the short rail to facilitate proper racking. I was recently working the drill mentioned above about placing a ball on the spot and rolling it down to the center diamond and back to test my stroke. I kept putting unwanted right english on the ball. Eventually I looked down at my shaft before hitting the ball. I noticed it was aimed left of the line on the table, even though, looking down table, it appeared that I was aimed dead straight. I then realized that this was because my head was aimed to the left (I shoot lefty). As I stroked, apparently my subconscious (or whatever) took over and made the adjustments to stroke straight, but because I was originally misaligned, this led to a swooping stroke that applied right english. Thus, the test mentioned about checking your shaft position after striking the ball is not fully accurate. Your shaft must be pointed down that line in the first place; then, if it is over the spot after the stroke, you know you did well.

Having realized this error and now making a conscious effort to avoid it, I am delivering the cue ball much more accurately. Granted, the rest of one's mechanics must be correct as well; if your head is straight but your shoulder, elbow, or grip hand are out of whack, you're still going to have a difficult time.

If you find it difficult to check this, try wearing a baseball cap, but make sure it is on straight. Then you can use the brim to see if it is lined up with the shot. Or keep a cigarette in your mouth, and make sure it lines up with your aiming line.

Finally, making that head turn while getting low on the stick can be physically uncomfortable. If you find that this is your issue, but it's too much strain, try standing up a little.

Hope this helps.

mworkman
01-16-2007, 10:23 AM
Berznarf.. You mentioned head position. I think you are onto something there. I normally would stand with my chin over the cue, now I've been using my dominant eye which is my right eye over the cue and lining up the shot that way.

Actually, if I close my left eye and line up the shot, it gets rid of my unwanted right english and the ball goes straight up and down or might come back a little to the left. I'm going to keep working at it untill my cueball no longer spins or turns after a good stop shot. I think this will help me miss a little less often, if I can get this down. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

DeadCrab
01-17-2007, 07:24 AM
As is obvious from all the responses, this is a complex issue.

If you don't mind some slow downloads, visit www.joetucker.net (http://www.joetucker.net) and watch his videos on the "3rd Eye" device.

It is pretty obvious that he has a major problem with ocular dominance, and if that is your situation, his device may help you. Regardless of the cause, the second of the three videos available shows some good stroke drills.

You might try closing the eye that you don't site with, and using a rail-bridge, to see if the problem is with the stroke itself, versus a vision or bridge problem.

Tony_in_MD
01-18-2007, 03:49 PM
Lots of advice on this topic. I will add a few more drills that has worked for me.

Some have mentioned the lag drill from spot to spot down the table. If you use a ball with a stripe down the middle (place stripe vertical) you will see immediatly if you have any inconsistanices in your stroke if the bar wobbles as the ball is in motion.

I purchased the elephant balls practice set and used these for some time when I started playing.

Also someone mentioned Bert Kinisters "mighty X" routine. I think a better stroke developing shot is his shot number 1 in the 60 minute 9 ball workout. I start off every practice session with about 60 of these (30 stop and 30 draw back to the pocket). Trust me that drill will straigten out your stroke.

cushioncrawler
01-19-2007, 01:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tony_in_MD:</font><hr> ....Some have mentioned the lag drill from spot to spot down the table. If you use a ball with a stripe down the middle (place stripe vertical) you will see immediatly if you have any inconsistanices in your stroke if the bar wobbles as the ball is in motion.... <hr /></blockquote>
Tony -- I allwayz say 2 thingz about marked qballz.
1... A marked qball iz the only way to check yor action.
2... A marked qball duznt allow u to check your perception of where the center of the qball iz. madMac.

mworkman
01-19-2007, 06:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr> As is obvious from all the responses, this is a complex issue.

If you don't mind some slow downloads, visit www.joetucker.net (http://www.joetucker.net) and watch his videos on the "3rd Eye" device.

It is pretty obvious that he has a major problem with ocular dominance, and if that is your situation, his device may help you. Regardless of the cause, the second of the three videos available shows some good stroke drills.

You might try closing the eye that you don't site with, and using a rail-bridge, to see if the problem is with the stroke itself, versus a vision or bridge problem. <hr /></blockquote>

I actually bought one of those 3rd eye dohickies. I tried bending it into shape and it broke, I did watch the CD and should do that again.

I also have a Stroke Trainer ($150.00) which I think did help my stroke, but I think it is slightly flawed because when you are practicing your stroke you are putting pressure against the plate. And with out it, you will have a tendency to have your arm come in some.

I'm going to keep working on it, and I think my stroke is pretty good actually and will keep getting better.

Tony_in_MD
01-19-2007, 03:12 PM
Please explain to me your reasoning that a marked cueball does not allow you to check your perspective of where the center of the cueball is.

I belive that the markings on the cueball can help you see where center is, and after you strike the ball the chalk mark will show you if you actually hit what you aimed for.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cushioncrawler:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tony_in_MD:</font><hr> ....Some have mentioned the lag drill from spot to spot down the table. If you use a ball with a stripe down the middle (place stripe vertical) you will see immediatly if you have any inconsistanices in your stroke if the bar wobbles as the ball is in motion.... <hr /></blockquote>
Tony -- I allwayz say 2 thingz about marked qballz.
1... A marked qball iz the only way to check yor action.
2... A marked qball duznt allow u to check your perception of where the center of the qball iz. madMac. <hr /></blockquote>

cushioncrawler
01-19-2007, 04:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tony_in_MD:</font><hr> Please explain to me your reasoning that a marked cueball does not allow you to check your perspective of where the center of the cueball is. I belive that the markings on the cueball can help you see where center is, and after you strike the ball the chalk mark will show you if you actually hit what you aimed for.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cushioncrawler:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tony_in_MD:</font><hr> ....Some have mentioned the lag drill from spot to spot down the table. If you use a ball with a stripe down the middle (place stripe vertical) you will see immediatly if you have any inconsistanices in your stroke if the bar wobbles as the ball is in motion.... <hr /></blockquote> Tony -- I allwayz say 2 thingz about marked qballz.
1... A marked qball iz the only way to check yor action.
2... A marked qball duznt allow u to check your perception of where the center of the qball iz. madMac. <hr /></blockquote> <hr /></blockquote> Tony. Yes, i agree with u, that a marked qball is very usefull for checking aim, and that the chalk mark helps u to check the actual contact (compared to the intended contact). But what i meant was that in the end u will have to play using an unmarked qball, and everything will look different. This sort of problem would be solved if u had a qball that had markings on one half only, then u could use it to do the sorts of checks that u mentioned, and u could uze the plain face to do the sort of checks that i mentioned (here the markings would still show u how well u went, without showing u where the center of the qball is). madMac.