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View Full Version : Super Aramith Pro Balls? Worth the extra $$$?



GKH
01-18-2007, 07:02 AM
I have been reading a little on Billard Balls. And; I want to upgrade from the polyesters that I currently have. Everything seems to point to the Super Aramith Pro. For the average home player like myself, is it worth the difference to buy these? Or; would the Aramith Premium be a good enough choice? Sure! I want the best! /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif Who doesn't?! Will these actually help extend the cloth life? And; will the play be more precise?

I was on the Aramith site and the differences look subatantial. I read about the heat resistance qualities, etc,,,.

All comments welcome, and appreciated!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Thanks!

(and yes,,, I want to get one of the 'measle' red-spotted cue balls)

- Greg

Billy_Bob
01-18-2007, 07:20 AM
Yes. I have seen people buy cheap balls and they only last a year or so. I've had Pro balls for several years and they are still good as new (have replaced the cloth on my table 3 times during same period.)

So I think the Pro balls are actually less expensive in the long run instead of buying cheap balls and having to replace them once a year.

ceebee
01-18-2007, 09:33 AM
Aramith SUPER billiard balls are great, same ball as the Brunswick Centennial (made by Aramith). I believe the Super ball will keep it's luster longer & play better longer.

A $150.00 doesn't go very far, so buying something that will last is good idea...

DeadCrab
01-18-2007, 09:50 AM
The place where I play recovers the tables regularly, but the balls (especially cue) are badly chipped. I like to blame my misses on the chipped cueballs, and in some cases, I am probably correct in doing so. Balls that are chipped or out-of-round won't roll true.

I am planning to buy a good set to take with me when I play. The choice comes down to Super Aramith and Centennials.

I will probably get the Centennials because they have a distinct appearance and I won't be accused of walking off with the pool hall's set.

idfliers
01-18-2007, 09:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote GKH:</font><hr>

All comments welcome, and appreciated!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Thanks!

(and yes,,, I want to get one of the 'measle' red-spotted cue balls)

- Greg <hr /></blockquote>

Well, I just received a set 2 days ago, and WOW they look nice! Haven't got to play them yet, waiting on the new cloth (today I hope!), but you can feel the quality. They are so glossy they seem like they are made out of glass and they have such a smooth surface.
I really don't see how anyone could be dissapointed with them.
I picked up the Super Pro valu pack which had the set with measle cue ball, Aramith microfiber cloth, ball cleaner and the training ball with instruction booklet for just $125.

I'm pleased with them and I haven't even played them yet!

GKH
01-18-2007, 09:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote idfliers:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote GKH:</font><hr>

All comments welcome, and appreciated!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Thanks!

(and yes,,, I want to get one of the 'measle' red-spotted cue balls)

- Greg <hr /></blockquote>

Well, I just received a set 2 days ago, and WOW they look nice! Haven't got to play them yet, waiting on the new cloth (today I hope!), but you can feel the quality. They are so glossy they seem like they are made out of glass and they have such a smooth surface.
I really don't see how anyone could be dissapointed with them.
I picked up the Super Pro valu pack which had the set with measle cue ball, Aramith microfiber cloth, ball cleaner and the training ball with instruction booklet for just $125.

I'm pleased with them and I haven't even played them yet! <hr /></blockquote>

Excellent! That is the set, I am considering, as well. $125.00 sounds like the best price yet! Online?

Thanks!

- Greg

idfliers
01-18-2007, 10:45 AM
Greg, yes online or give Joe or Kathy a call.
http://stores.ebay.com/Nielsens-Billiards

Joe Nielsen
Nielsens Billiards
2601 Taylor Avenue
Springfield, IL 62703
Phone 217-585-1660
Fax 217-585-8077

No affiliation with them, just a happy customer. When you call Joe, tell him "Forest Green" sent you! He'll get a kick out of it.

GKH
01-18-2007, 10:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote idfliers:</font><hr> Greg, yes online or give Joe or Kathy a call.
http://stores.ebay.com/Nielsens-Billiards

Joe Nielsen
Nielsens Billiards
2601 Taylor Avenue
Springfield, IL 62703
Phone 217-585-1660
Fax 217-585-8077

No affiliation with them, just a happy customer. When you call Joe, tell him "Forest Green" sent you! He'll get a kick out of it. <hr /></blockquote>

Excellent! Yeah! I too, am a very happy customer of Neilsen's Billiards! (no affiliation)

Let's Do This!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Thanks!

- Greg

Chopstick
01-18-2007, 11:24 AM
I have two sets and I hate em. The reason I bought the second set was because I had my table in storage for a couple years and I had them in the original box and they turned yellow. No way to clean them back to original condition.

They chip during normal use. My home table is on a carpeted floor. The olny thing for them to hit is each other.

You cannot keep the things clean. They ooze some kind of yellow film constantly. You can wax them perfect and they will be dull again in two days. You can wax them every day and you will still get some kind of yellow crap coming off of them. You can set one of those balls on a bookshelf and leave it there for a few months and it will turn yellow all by itself.

I got fed up with it last year and went out and got a set of Brunswick Centennials. Love em. No cleaning problems, they stay shiny and no chipping at all. I will never go back to those Aramiths.

GKH
01-18-2007, 01:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> I have two sets and I hate em. The reason I bought the second set was because I had my table in storage for a couple years and I had them in the original box and they turned yellow. No way to clean them back to original condition.

They chip during normal use. My home table is on a carpeted floor. The olny thing for them to hit is each other.

You cannot keep the things clean. They ooze some kind of yellow film constantly. You can wax them perfect and they will be dull again in two days. You can wax them every day and you will still get some kind of yellow crap coming off of them. You can set one of those balls on a bookshelf and leave it there for a few months and it will turn yellow all by itself.

I got fed up with it last year and went out and got a set of Brunswick Centennials. Love em. No cleaning problems, they stay shiny and no chipping at all. I will never go back to those Aramiths. <hr /></blockquote>

Whoa!!!! That doesn't sound good. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif How do they chip without striking sharp objects?

Ralph S.
01-18-2007, 02:36 PM
Ditto the $150.00 comment!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

sygfrid
01-18-2007, 11:09 PM
Ordinary balls like the Aramith Premium &amp; Premier do chip faster since their surface are really not that hard. They also become smaller over time especially in pool halls wherein they are used constantly.

B. Centennials &amp; A. Pro Cups have harder surfaces making them more scratch resistant, but it doesn't mean that they won't chip (mine eventually developed some over time). However, they certainly maintain their gloss for quite a very long time.

If you use 3-step detailing (like w/ the cars) or even Aramith Billiard Ball cleaner on the balls &amp; put them in an electric ball polisher, you can get that TV-shine. The friction that the electric ball polisher creates "melts" the wax/polish creating a deep shine. Unfortunately, it's very hard to achieve the same gloss with just using the hands. If you have more budget, I suggest you invest in one also /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

GKH
01-20-2007, 11:53 AM
Thanks for all the comments everyone! Neilsen's has them now for $119.99 for the Super Aramith Pro Package. 'Think that's what I am going to get.

- Greg

Shaft
01-23-2007, 09:23 AM
I am not sure, but I think the "yellow" (some might call it cream?) color is a deliberate design feature of the ASP balls.

I recently got a sold-separately measles ball in the mail, and at first recoiled at how "old" it looked, but it is the same color as the "white" areas of the new ASP balls I have. I guess it is a matter of taste: the cream color might look richer, more luxurious, than a stark white.

GKH
01-23-2007, 10:04 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Shaft:</font><hr> I am not sure, but I think the "yellow" (some might call it cream?) color is a deliberate design feature of the ASP balls.

I recently got a sold-separately measles ball in the mail, and at first recoiled at how "old" it looked, but it is the same color as the "white" areas of the new ASP balls I have. I guess it is a matter of taste: the cream color might look richer, more luxurious, than a stark white. <hr /></blockquote>

I ordered the Super Aramith Pro Cup set w/ measles cue, Rempe training ball, and cleaner w/cloth on Sunday. It arrives tomorrow. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

It seems to me, if I remember correctly, that when I was a kid (in the 1960's) and playing pool at my cousin's house, the balls were more of a cream color. And; I think, I remember them all saying that they were Belgian Ivory.

So; did Billiard Balls used to be made from 'actual' ivory? I always thought the best were. But; I was young.

- Greg

Shaft
01-23-2007, 11:40 AM
I am no expert historian, but I understand that balls have been made of wood, ivory (elephant and marine), clay, celluloid, polyester, phenolic resin (whatever that is) and probably many other materials I don't know about.

FatsRedux
01-23-2007, 04:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote GKH:</font><hr>
So; did Billiard Balls used to be made from 'actual' ivory? I always thought the best were. But; I was young.

- Greg <hr /></blockquote>

In ancient times various materials were tried for use as billiard balls. Those materials included wood, clay, leather, and metal. Eventually ivory was seized upon as the best material for billiard balls.

Ivory billiard balls were used from around the middle of the 15th Century until as late as the 1970's. (In America, A. E. Schmidt was still making ivory balls up until 1975.)

The problem with Ivory is that being a natural substance it (like wood) tends to react to variations in temperature and humidity (shrinking somewhat when very dry, and swelling somewhat when conditions are humid). Elephants tusks have a nerve that runs down the middle and which can be seen when the tusk is sliced. That area is called the end grain while the outer portion of the tusk is called the side grain. In ivory as in wood, it is the end grain that is most susceptible to shrinkage and swelling. This leads to cracks in the surface of the balls and balls going out of roundness (resulting in balls that don't roll true).

Ivory balls required lots of maintenance and had to be trued constantly. In the 1800's, it was customary to check the size and weight of the balls in front of all present before beginning a championship match. Manufacturing ivory balls required the services of skilled craftsmen known as "ivory turners". The turners would have to make sure the ivory ball was spot on the center of the tusk to assure that it was balanced and rolled true. Great care had to be taken to avoid heating up or cracking the ball in the process of turning and cutting, and then the balls had to be left to season for about two years before they were suitable for play. On average a tusk would yield three to four balls, and a shipment of fifty tusks could have as few as one tusk that was suitable for balls. Then there were the complications involved with supply, shipping, and storage of tusks. All of these things made ivory balls a very expensive matter, so expensive that a set of matched ivory billiard balls (three balls) went for around $60.00 in the 1870's (a huge amount of money for the time).

In 1863 the firm of Phelan and Collender offered a prize of $10,000.00 for the patent rights to anyone who could develop a suitable substitute for ivory in billiard balls.

In 1868 John Hyatt invented the first composition ball. The balls were made mostly from pulp and gum shellac. In 1869 Hyatt developed a new ball with the addition of a hard, shiny, and perfectly smooth outer casing of collodian. The Hyatt Co. dubbed their new ball with the name "celluloid".

The celluloid manufacturing process was a dangerous business as the materials used (gun cotton,nitrocellulose, camphor, alcohol, shellac) were explosive. In fact the Hyatt factory in Newark, NJ was the site of 39 explosions and fires in 36 years. Perhaps because of the reports of explosions at the factory, stories began to abound about celluloid billiards balls exploding on impact when hit hard. Actually the balls were not exploding, but were in fact shattering due to a manufacturing defect which was eventually adressed by Hyatt.

Celluloid balls eventually became accepted, although purists still demanded ivory and shuddered at the thought of playing with inferior celluloid balls. Hyatt became a very wealthy man and he never claimed the $10,000.00 prize from Phelan and Collender because he knew the patents were worth a fortune. Celluloid continued to be widely used until the early 20th century.

In the early 1900's Leo Baekeland developed the first artificial plastic. Baekeland's discovery was a phenolic resin which he named "Bakelite". Bakelite was not explosive or flammable, it was easy to work with, and more importantly, its playing characteristics were very similar to ivory.

Finally, after many years the billiard industry and the billiard playing public had a substitute that most felt was on a par with ivory. Bakelite became widely used world-wide.

After WWII, Saluc, a company in Belgium began experimenting with various phenolic resin compounds for use in billiard, snooker, and pool balls. Today Saluc manufactures 80% of the world's billiard balls, these are sold under the Aramith, Super Aramith, Tournament Champion, and Crystalate brands.

Fats

GKH
01-23-2007, 05:18 PM
Thanks Fats!

Friends; that is what I call an informative reply! /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif Yowza!!

- Greg

GKH
01-24-2007, 11:55 AM
My Super Aramith Pro-Cup set arrived today. : /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif Very nice! And yes; they are a cream color - not the pure white like the Chinese Polyester that came with my table.

Looking forward to playing a little tonight. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

- Greg