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ArizonaPete
01-26-2007, 08:11 PM
I've been using an Eliminator Cue for about 4 years and have been satisfied with it. I don't know what kind of tip is on it (probably a very inexpensive one). It seems to be performing well and is in good shape. I've pic-tip'd it to increase chalk retention.
My question is how long does a tip last and should I replace the one on my cue? Is a soft tip for maximum cue ball control the best hardness. I see Bustamante and Reyes on TV and they really stroke the ball and hit it so low that it appears the cue almost touches the felt. If I hit the cue ball too low, it jumps.
I'd appreciate any input and some recommendations as to cuetip care and maintenace.
ArizonaPete

BillyJack
01-28-2007, 11:42 PM
There's no single right answer for your questions. Generally, when a tip wears down to the thickness of a dime, it's time to replace. I've never made it that long. There's always a different tip to try long before mine is worn down. Do you shape your tips? Here's another area of split decisions. Some players never re-shape, while others (like me) probably over-maintain their tips. Maybe it's a confidence thing-I feel I need equipment to be 100% or I won't be 100%. As far as jumping the CB, that's probably a stroke issue rather than a tip issue, and I can't really answer that. Either way, you'll probably find an improvement in your entire game after going to a premium tip. Search around the forum for ideas. Generally, most common is a medium tip, but as I mentioned earlier there's no single absolute best tip for everyone.

FatsRedux
01-29-2007, 01:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ArizonaPete:</font><hr> I've been using an Eliminator Cue for about 4 years and have been satisfied with it. I don't know what kind of tip is on it (probably a very inexpensive one). It seems to be performing well and is in good shape. I've pic-tip'd it to increase chalk retention.
My question is how long does a tip last and should I replace the one on my cue?

<font color="red"> There is no definitive answer. It depends on tip hardness and type, on how well it was installed, environmental factors i.e. heat and humidity, and how much and how often you feel a need to groom the tip.

I have tried every iteration of Moori, ditto Tiger, Talisman, and many others. I've pretty much settled on Triangle as my favorite. I get about a year out of a Triangle. I use my tips until they are about 3/4 the thickness of a dime. Call me nuts but I think tips play best when they're thin. I usually got about 1 1/2 years out of laminated tips. </font color>

Is a soft tip for maximum cue ball control the best hardness.

<font color="red">Not always true, depends on what works best for an individual.

My advice to you is this..if you are already a competent confident player in the A or B class then by all means try some different tips. You'll quickly find out if you like 'em or not. If you're a D or C player you need to worry more about other things (unless the tip is soo bad or is just shot). BTW- I'd probably be willing to bet that the tip on your cue is a LePro. </font color>

I see Bustamante and Reyes on TV and they really stroke the ball and hit it so low that it appears the cue almost touches the felt. If I hit the cue ball too low, it jumps.

<font color="red">If Reyes or Busta, or YOU hit it "too low" it will jump. Stop hitting the ball too low! Work on perfecting a straight smooth stroke, and a solid pre-shot routine. BTW-don't elevate the butt of the cue to draw, there are very few times you should need jack up draw. </font color>

I'd appreciate any input and some recommendations as to cuetip care and maintenace.
ArizonaPete <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="red">Maintaing the tip is easy. Wet the edge of the tip with water, or saliva then burnish the edge all around with a leather cue slicker or grocery bag paper till it shines. Burnishing will help prevent mushrooming. Don't constantly sand, scuff, or shape the tip. A tip pik is ok as long as you're only tapping the tip with the points. Chalk before each shot. Remove the chalk from the tip before with a cloth or napkin before you put it away in your case.

Hope this helps.

Fats</font color>

SpiderMan
01-29-2007, 08:24 AM
Hey Pete,

Maintenance is a fairly individual thing. Some folks obsess over keeping the crown a particular shape, polishing the sides, etc, while others just chalk and play.

Maintaining the crown probably has some relationship to consistency for a lot of players. The price you pay (and I think it's worth it) is longevity - the more you scuff and shape, the quicker the tip is used up.

I usually recommend replacement when the sidewalls (the "sides" of the tip, just above the ferrule) are down to the thickness of a nickel. While such a tip may still play OK, you don't have much room left for re-shaping. Also, the tip gets harder and harder as it wears. The longer you wait, the bigger your adjustment when you return to a newly-installed tip. If you're particularly equipment-sensitive, never replace your tip immediately before a big tournament. Do it early and give yourself some time to get familiar again.

Cueing low - good equipment is obviously important, but it's as much technique as anything else. Poor or inaccurate delivery of the cue probably causes more miscues than forgetting to chalk.

SpiderMan

ArizonaPete
01-29-2007, 08:32 AM
Thanks to all that replied to my post. You guys have given me some comprehensive and very informative information. I'm going fret less about my cuetip and concentrate more on my position play.

Billy_Bob
01-29-2007, 10:07 AM
One thing is for sure, "change" in the tip department equals many players game going down the tubes for awhile.

I frequently see someone get a new (different) tip installed which probably has a different tip shape than the old. Then their game goes downhill for awhile until they get used to the new tip.

Some players will spend thousands of dollars on the butt of their cue, the name printed there or what it looks like. But they will scream bloody murder at spending $25 on a tip!

I'm the opposite. I feel the tip is the "business end" of the cue. Care, and money spent on my tip has no limit with me.

I want my tip to be a "known" specification. Always exactly the same, even after installing a new tip.

So always same brand, always same hardness, always same curve on tip, tip lightly scuffed with sandpaper scuffer after about every 8 hours of play - always has good surface condition, and always a good even amount of chalk applied (especially around the sides of the tip).

So I would suggest picking a specific brand and hardness of tip. (I use a Moori hard [Q].) I prefer hard because it keeps its shape longer and lasts longer. Then pick a shape. Most players prefer nickel. (I use dime shaped).

Then always replace your tip with the same exact thing - same exact shape.

Dime or nickel sandpaper shapers here...
http://www.excel.net/~mniver/products.html

thunderball
01-29-2007, 01:24 PM
I suggest getting a quality layered leather tip.
The most popular hardness is medium and that seems like a logical place to start to me.

I started playing with med. talisman tips a long while back and the "feel" is much better then the cheaper "one piece" tips that usually come on production cues.

I just bought a new cue and spent 30 bucks to replace the brand new tip if that gives you any idea of how important the feel is to me.

Stick with something popular so it can be replaced by the same product again as the years pass.

I too play with a dime radius,but many people I know play with a nickel curve.

IMO if you go with a quality med. layered tip you will consider the money well spent.