PDA

View Full Version : What does "Dogging a shot." mean



BigRigTom
01-29-2007, 09:22 AM
I have heard the phrase "I dogged that shot.!" or a commentator will say "He dogged the shot on the 8 and now has a terrible leave on the 9!" What do you think that actually means? Does the definition vary with the circumstances? What is the instructors advice on avoiding or conquering the tendancy to "dog a shot"?

Bob_Jewett
01-29-2007, 10:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr> I have heard the phrase "I dogged that shot.!" or a commentator will say "He dogged the shot on the 8 and now has a terrible leave on the 9!" What do you think that actually means? Does the definition vary with the circumstances? What is the instructors advice on avoiding or conquering the tendancy to "dog a shot"? <hr /></blockquote>
I think of it as letting your mind get in the way of your arm.

The problem is that everyone misses shots due to lots of different causes. For example, a ball might skid (also called cling and kick). Or you might miss position due to a funny spot on the cushion, a problem that is becoming more and more common. Some might think the player "dogged" the shot when in fact he was as perfectly prepared to shoot it as ever.

As for avoiding the mental side, several books on the mental aspect are available, but some of them are probably harmful. I like Gallwey and Fancher. The other thing to do is get more experience in the situations that might make you nervous, such as tournament finals.

Brian in VA
01-29-2007, 10:26 AM
I don't know for sure but my guess would be it comes from the saying "choking like a dog." Nobody likes to say that word so it's less painful to say dogging.

As far as stopping it, I think one can only reduce its occurrence. Everybody "dogs" it at some point although Tiger Woods is trying to disprove that theory. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif I've had good luck by stopping to breathe for a moment and then clearing my mind of impure thoughts. And if they reappear, get up off the shot and start over. Doesn't mean it won't happen, just means you've done as much as you can to avoid it.

Brian in VA

Stretch
01-29-2007, 11:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr> I have heard the phrase "I dogged that shot.!" or a commentator will say "He dogged the shot on the 8 and now has a terrible leave on the 9!" What do you think that actually means? Does the definition vary with the circumstances? What is the instructors advice on avoiding or conquering the tendancy to "dog a shot"? <hr /></blockquote>

Dogging, choking, hitting a hair ball, throwing up a brick. all used to describe a very makeable (for you) shot that for some reason goes all wrong. Most often happens when the pressure is on and you begin to tighten up but can really occur at any time you let your focus and concentration wander.

I've found that in most cases it's my mental preparation just prior to getting over the shot that is the culprit. When i'm a little wishy-washy on what "exactly" i need to do.

When all the information is gathered and stored in your brain and you've visualised the shot then being able to let it out with trust and conviction in a smoothed RELAXED manour is what i aim for on every shot. still there are times when something short circuits and it results in the dreaded dog ball. Everyone misses, sometimes all you can do is laugh it off, and re-commit. For some players it's just a wake up call. For others who are plagued by these aberrations on a regular basis i'd suggest professional help. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif st.

Fran Crimi
02-01-2007, 07:22 PM
Hey Tom.

I think it means that the player let their fear get to them and it caused them to miss the shot.

Even if you miss a crucial shot, as long as there is no fear, you didn't dog it; you just missed it.

Sometimes it's obvious that a player is feeling fear. Other times it's not so obvious, and many shots that were accused of being 'dogged' were just missed.

Fran

Snapshot9
02-02-2007, 10:43 AM
So Fran ... Would you say Efren dogged that 9 ball against Tony Crosby in the WPC, or just missed it? ..... lol or as we say 'had a brain fart'?

Qtec
02-02-2007, 02:14 PM
It took me all of 10 mins to provide a link to your reference.
video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1tgkLvyUME)

Q

BigRigTom
02-06-2007, 11:13 AM
Thanks Fran and all the rest of you for your insights.
I have been working with one of Joe Tuckers drills where you shoot a ball straight into the corner pocket while trying to 1. follow the object ball into the pocket with the cue ball, 2. draw the cue ball into the corner behind the shot. Practicing this shot from various distances. It is great practice and tells you a pretty good story if you watch the 2 balls paths closely.

Long story short: If I shoot this drill using all 15 balls I make the shot around 90% of the time. I tried it using the 8 ball only and shooting the 8 ball every shot and my success dropped to 76% of the time.
My next move is to try it with JUST the 9 ball and see how that turns out.

How about some comments on this?
Have any of you tried anything similar and if so how did it turn out for you?

DickLeonard
02-06-2007, 11:35 AM
BigRig try hitting the same shot with a fake draw, that is when you hit the cueball with draw make sure that the cueball will stop rotating backwards then start rotating forward. You should increase your percent of balls pocketed.

In the olden days most players would line up their shots by aiming with their cuetip in the draw position then raise their cue during the final delivery.####

bradb
02-06-2007, 11:36 AM
Tom, I don't think I've ever seen Efren move before a shot like he did? You could see his cue was wobbling on his back swing also. Nerves of course, but he just plain forgot to stroke!!

Sometimes we all lose it, and forget even the simple basics. I put some initials on my cue butt to remind me to not move, but I might as well have put it in Greek when I get in that mode. -Brad

BigRigTom
02-06-2007, 11:46 AM
Thanks Dick,
I understand what you are saying there. I have actually suspected that the "fake draw" shot was more successful but had not taken the time or trouble to test the theory.
Thanks again for the advice.

What got me interested in this drill was that I suspected that I was NOT hitting the cue ball cosistently where I intended to hit it but I could not be sure what I was doing wrong. In one of Joe Tuckers video he talked about this phenomenon and the trouble of actually identifying the problem.
It also seems to get magnified on the 8 ball and I have managed to lose a lot of matches by missing the 8 ball after dominating the table up to that point.

Anyways.....I think I see the light at the end of the tunnel now.

Fran Crimi
02-06-2007, 12:00 PM
I don't think he dogged it. I think he either made a bad judgement call or got a bit of bad luck. Yes, it's obvious he was nervous but he's played nervous before and won. It's possible the shot didn't go (too thin) and he tried to curve the cb with inside. Or, he may have just used inside to adjust the angle of the cb off the rail to kick full at the 5 to set it up for his next shot. Or, it could be a bit of both, so he obviously had a lot going on there with that little shot.

Another possibility is that he expected the cb to curve more and instead it slid more due to new cloth and waxed balls. That would be the bad luck part I mentioned. Hard to judge new cloth sometimes.

By his body movement at the moment he hit the ball, it seems as if he was very concerned about the cb, and may have looked up too soon to see where the cb was going, right at the moment of impact, taking his focus off the shot for a millisecond. That's all it takes to miss. So, as you can see, with all he was trying to accomplish, that little shot was pretty complicated and very missable.

Fran

bradb
02-06-2007, 12:30 PM
Fran take a look at that first shot in the side, you can see his whole left arm coming forward with the cue, I heard one commentator say thats wishing the shot to go. I think its your stroke arm tightening up so you throw your whole body into the stroke. Even Efren won't make a ball with that move. I wish I had a buck for everytime I've done that. /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Fran Crimi
02-06-2007, 02:21 PM
Yes, there was definitely some wishing going on. He did get up off the shot once and then reset himself, too. I think that he saw the difficulty of the shot, didn't like it, but decided to go ahead and shoot it the way he did, maybe despite his better judgement. Maybe he was feeling the pressure of the timeclock and rushed it a bit. I'm still not convinced he dogged it.

Fran

bradb
02-06-2007, 02:35 PM
He difinately was indecisive and went ahead with a touchy little spin that he was't commited too completely. It probably rattled him so much he gave up on the game and was'nt readdy to come back. When his opponent missed, who oddly enough, had given up on the game himself, Efren was still in the same mode. Thats a rare one!!!

Fran Crimi
02-06-2007, 10:54 PM
Yup. I agree wholeheartedly with your analysis. It was surprising that he didn't recover quicker. It happens sometimes, but rarely to Efren. I remember once sitting in the stands at one of the first World Championships. Efren was clearly nervous and missed several times. He was so embarassed that he turned his chair around so he wouldn't have to face the audience. At that time all the players chairs were in the middle of the room facing the stands. I never forgot how he was the only one facing the other way. It was the only time I ever saw him lose his cool.

Fran

Qtec
02-07-2007, 04:41 AM
The first shot I think he was trying to throw the OB in with IE, so maybe it was borderline if it went or not.
In the second shot E gets down on the shot. Then, he moves to move to the left by lifting his right leg, which tells me that he was originally not in line with the shot. He should have stood up and started again.
What I noticed was that he hit the ball too thick. There's a good chance that this was originally where he was aiming before he realised he would have to move to the left.
Qtec

Fran Crimi
02-07-2007, 08:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> The first shot I think he was trying to throw the OB in with IE, so maybe it was borderline if it went or not.
In the second shot E gets down on the shot. Then, he moves to move to the left by lifting his right leg, which tells me that he was originally not in line with the shot. He should have stood up and started again.
What I noticed was that he hit the ball too thick. There's a good chance that this was originally where he was aiming before he realised he would have to move to the left.
Qtec <hr /></blockquote>

I'm not sure what his thought process was in moving his leg. I thought that maybe he was slipping and adjusted himself. Maybe it was an aiming thing, I don't know. I do know for sure, though, that he was off-balance when he shot it, and he moved during the stroke.

Fran

bradb
02-07-2007, 05:43 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> Yup. I agree wholeheartedly with your analysis. It was surprising that he didn't recover quicker. It happens sometimes, but rarely to Efren. I remember once sitting in the stands at one of the first World Championships. Efren was clearly nervous and missed several times. He was so embarassed that he turned his chair around so he wouldn't have to face the audience. At that time all the players chairs were in the middle of the room facing the stands. I never forgot how he was the only one facing the other way. It was the only time I ever saw him lose his cool.

Fran <hr /></blockquote>

Fran, I think that is why Efren's such a great champion. He can be humble and he cares about what his fans think of him.
There are so many egos in this game. I've never seen Strickland in person but I watched him in one match where he bitched about an opponents soft break, insulted the female ref, and almost jumped into the stands after a spectator. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

HOWARD
02-07-2007, 05:56 PM
BigRig,

Most of the time, it means missing the shot or the position when the heat is on. Some translate that to a choke. But if you dog the position by foot - well?

And many people use it for for the smaller dogs too, miss the break slightly. Did not hit the nut safetly etc.

Howard