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Shaft
01-31-2007, 09:55 AM
Forgive a stupid question...

I have never seen a phenolic cue tip. Is it "phenolic" like pool balls are "phenolic," or is it "phenolic" like Slatron is "phenolic?"

The BCA rules state that cue tips "... must be composed of a piece of specially processed leather or other fibrous or pliable material that extends to the natural line of the shaft end of the cue..."

Do phenolic tips meet this requirement?

Rich R.
01-31-2007, 10:35 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Shaft:</font><hr> Forgive a stupid question...

I have never seen a phenolic cue tip. Is it "phenolic" like pool balls are "phenolic," or is it "phenolic" like Slatron is "phenolic?"

The BCA rules state that cue tips "... must be composed of a piece of specially processed leather or other fibrous or pliable material that extends to the natural line of the shaft end of the cue..."

Do phenolic tips meet this requirement? <hr /></blockquote>
You may be able to search for the answer to your question. It has been discussed before.
IIRC, the there are several different types of phenolic and the type used in tips does have some sort of fibrous material in it and it is legal under BCA and World rules.

FatsRedux
01-31-2007, 04:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Shaft:</font><hr> Forgive a stupid question...

I have never seen a phenolic cue tip. Is it "phenolic" like pool balls are "phenolic," or is it "phenolic" like Slatron is "phenolic?"

<font color="red">Phenolic or "phenol-formaldehyde" plastics are the result of a polymerization process, between phenol and formaldehyde heated together. The reactions are complex, but the final result is a hard "plastic" made of cross-linked polymer chains. Phenolic plastics are thermoset plastics which means that unlike "thermoplastics" they cannot be melted and re-molded. Thermoset plastics form bonds between polymers when "cured", creating a tangled matrix that cannot be undone without destroying the plastic.

Most phenolic cue tips are made from canvas linen phenolic (phenolic resin to which canvas linen fiber has been added prior to final curing). It is the addition of canvas linen or other fibrous material that allows the phenolic tip to meet BCA requirements.
</font color>
<hr /></blockquote>
<font color="red"> BTW, I'm not an expert on plastics but I did sleep at a Holiday Inn once, or twice. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
</font color>

Fats

cushioncrawler
01-31-2007, 05:40 PM
My thorts. Bakelite was the first manmade plastic, invented in about 1907. After about 1922, everything was made of bakelite -- balls, ferrules, radios etc. Nowadays, they call it phenolic rezin, but its still bakelite, but "bakelite" iznt sexynuff for mr aramith and mrs brunswick and Co. madMac.

FatsRedux
01-31-2007, 10:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cushioncrawler:</font><hr> My thorts. Bakelite was the first manmade plastic, invented in about 1907. After about 1922, everything was made of bakelite -- balls, ferrules, radios etc. Nowadays, they call it phenolic rezin, but its still bakelite, but "bakelite" iznt sexynuff for mr aramith and mrs brunswick and Co. madMac. <hr /></blockquote>

I agree 100%. The modern versions may have been tweaked here and there, but essentially it's still Bakelite.

Fats

DeadCrab
02-01-2007, 06:17 AM
So if phenolic tips are just plastic, could it be that they have less "feel and feedback" than a screw-on?
/ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

Shaft
02-01-2007, 08:17 AM
Many thanks to CC and Fats!
If I am ever persuaded to use one, can I install a phenolic tip myself, or does it take an expert?

FatsRedux
02-01-2007, 12:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Shaft:</font><hr> Many thanks to CC and Fats!
If I am ever persuaded to use one, can I install a phenolic tip myself, or does it take an expert? <hr /></blockquote>

Installing a phenolic tip requires a lathe to turn down the sides until they are flush with the edges of the ferrule. Unless you have a lathe and have installed tips before, I would recommend you leave the job up to a pro.

Fats

FatsRedux
02-01-2007, 12:39 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr> So if phenolic tips are just plastic, could it be that they have less "feel and feedback" than a screw-on?
/ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif <hr /></blockquote>

I have never used a screw-on tip.

What I do know is that I have been using phenolic tips on my Predator BK and my McDermott break /jump cue with excellent results.

Think of it this way, suppose you get smacked in the knee with a rubber mallet and then you get smacked in your other knee with a steel hammer of equal weight...which one do you think will hurt more?

I'm not really looking for feel or feedback on the break. What I am looking for is to get the cue ball from point A to point B with maximum accuracy and maximum controlled speed and that's where a phenolic tip outshines a leather tip.

Fats

bataisbest
02-13-2007, 08:15 PM
So what's the advantage to using a "PHENOLIC TIP". Some tournaments, like the IPT , do not allow phenolic tips . I've heard of players being disqualified for using a phenolic tip but what is the reason for it? Is more accuracy the reason ?

bluey2king
02-14-2007, 10:25 AM
I have one and I use it ONLY onmy Break cue.
It is harder than the hubs of Hell...*L* it works well for Hard Breaks and jumps. You can buy them on ebay at a reasonable price and it will never wear out, it might come off but never wear out. You can hear the differance when you tap it against the cue ball it has a dink dink sound.
Also they don't hold chalk well because they are so hard, you would not want to play with it, oh yeah I just remembered Don't use english with it it will mis cue easily.