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View Full Version : Earl Wins the WPC 17-15



ted harris
07-21-2002, 03:18 PM
IMHO, Earl is the only American that could have done it!!!

07-21-2002, 03:23 PM
Ted you are right in this single elimination race. I wonder what the conditions were. Busta was up most of the match but Earl stayed in there. Bring it EARL!

BillyR in NC

Vagabond
07-21-2002, 04:26 PM
As a fellow North Carolinian I am going to bask on Earl`s (glory) win of the ultimate title.way to go Earl.Hats off to you.
Vagabond

stickman
07-21-2002, 05:01 PM
Irregardless of what I think of his behavior, I have to admire his ability on the table. Congrats to "the Pearl".

My sentimental favorite was Bustamante. Under the circumstances, I think his second place finish was phenomenal.

Cueless Joey
07-21-2002, 05:08 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: stickman:</font><hr> Irregardless of what I think of his behavior, I have to admire his ability on the table. Congrats to "the Pearl".

My sentimental favorite was Bustamante. Under the circumstances, I think his second place finish was phenomenal. <hr></blockquote>
Stick, irregardless is not a word. LOL
If Earl behaved better, maybe he'd get more endorsement deals so he wouldn't have to play with his un-American made cue.
He can play. But, it might be a little too much to ask him to go to racial sesitivity classes.

stickman
07-21-2002, 05:17 PM
Merriam - Webster

One entry found for irregardless.


Main Entry: ir·re·gard·less
Pronunciation: "ir-i-'gärd-l&s
Function: adverb
Etymology: probably blend of irrespective and regardless
Date: circa 1912
nonstandard : REGARDLESS
usage Irregardless originated in dialectal American speech in the early 20th century. Its fairly widespread use in speech called it to the attention of usage commentators as early as 1927. The most frequently repeated remark about it is that "there is no such word." There is such a word, however. It is still used primarily in speech, although it can be found from time to time in edited prose. Its reputation has not risen over the years, and it is still a long way from general acceptance. Use regardless instead.


I guess "regardless" might have been more generally accepted. Not a day goes by that I don't learn something new. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

Cueless Joey
07-21-2002, 05:24 PM
Stick, I am shocked. I have no idea how the prefix "ir" and the suffix "less" can be in the same word. That would be redundant I thought.

07-21-2002, 08:56 PM
Congratulations Earl u da man! Stedyfred

07-21-2002, 10:22 PM
Wow!
You must be a real pool player.....I learned that in school
30 years ago, while you must've been hangin' out at the pool
hall.