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bluey2king
02-11-2007, 04:05 PM
Hey I joined a 14.1 Leauge!
I played one match and to say I am learning is a under statement.
I could use some tips like How to Break. I will be getting a book to help. I will also look thru the books I have where I have skipped the straight pool section.
I really enjoyed my match and I am looking forward to next leauge night.

hoodsiejr
02-13-2007, 09:40 AM
The break I have used for ten years is use a little top right english and gently nudge the right base ball, the bottom ball on the rack, a thin cut on this ball with the right speed puts the cue ball back against the near short rail cushion. Many times with this break if it is played just right, the one ball that gets removed from the rack is hidden behind the rack. The most important key is your cue ball speed any long shot shot after the break is critical. The one most important aspect of straight pool is patience, patience, and more patience. Games are generally lost not because your opponent ran 100 balls but rather you tried something you should not have. If your going to to shoot at it you 'd better make it if any doubt look for a safe leave. The winner of most every game is the guy who makes the right decisions not necessarily the best player.

BigRigTom
02-13-2007, 12:44 PM
This may be a dumb question but here goes.....
How does the 14.1 player decide that it is time to bust up the rack and attempt to run out?

I am sure there is an intelligent decision to be made, I just don't quite understand how one arrives at that decision. Can anyone explain it to me?

Fran Crimi
02-13-2007, 01:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr> This may be a dumb question but here goes.....
How does the 14.1 player decide that it is time to bust up the rack and attempt to run out?

I am sure there is an intelligent decision to be made, I just don't quite understand how one arrives at that decision. Can anyone explain it to me? <hr /></blockquote>

Tom, there are very few top players who give the rack one big bust and then try to run out. It's more of a series of little bumps, knocking out a few balls here and there at a time. And there are distinct patterns to proceed in depending on the initial break ball position.

For example, if the initial break ball is along the side of the pack, then the second break shot is almost always in the back of the pack. Why? Because generally the shooter will strike the first break shot softly to knock out a few bottom balls, then will pocket a ball or two to manipulate the cb into position for the second break shot behind the pack. After that there is usually a series of behind the pack lightly struck break shots. One reason for that is to knock out a new break shot along side the rack area for the next rack's break ball.

It's tricky stuff and IMO can only be learned by watching good players do it.

Fran


Fran

BigRigTom
02-13-2007, 01:43 PM
I saw Steve Mizerak play a young German (someone suggested it was Oliver Ortman but I honestly don't remember his name...he lost to Mizerak) in the US Open at the Pick Congress Hotel - Chicago back in the mid 80's and they played straight pool, race to 150. I believe that is the same as what in now called 14.1.....am I correct on that?
Any way....that was the event that hooked me on pool. I was a typical bar room type slammer at that time and those 2 guys showed me what pool should look like when played right.
I have been intrigued by the game ever since and as most of the members of this board know I consider myself a student of the game. I don't have the raw talent that I see many players have and what I have achieved has been from plain old hard work and persistence. I play OK but am awed by players who have the coveted raw talent....wow!...they just don't always appreciate just how great of a thing that is.

HOWARD
02-13-2007, 05:27 PM
Here are a couple of tips for you. The center ball of the rack is the key ball - it is attached to all the balls throught the connections. After the rack is broken some what and you are considering another smack into the pack try to have a loose ball that will give you a shot - unless bad roll happens.
When running balls clear the balls around the corner pockets so as to have clear shots on the ball further away.
Also if someone has hit the pack and it is your shot check the rack carefully for combinations you can make or you might leave because of safety you are playing.

When you are stuck (and you will be) look for something simple - let the guy try the spectacular.

Howard

SPetty
02-13-2007, 07:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr> ...and they played straight pool, race to 150. I believe that is the same as what in now called 14.1.....am I correct on that?<hr /></blockquote>Yes

bluey2king
02-14-2007, 07:40 AM
Thanks to all for your input.
I played on Monday, lost of course but had a Great time.
I did get a lesson on reading the rack, though he called the ball in the cluster and made it from the side I couldn't really see the angles.
One thing I must learn is when to hit with speed and HOW much to get the carom and break out I need. So many times I made the hard shot he left me just to roll the CB into the cluster and not break anything out.
Thanks again to all I will many more Q's
I think I am Hooked
Bluey

dutchboy
02-14-2007, 07:43 AM
The year was 89, is was Ortmann, he lost to Steve in the semi's but beat him in the finals, 200 to 186. Steve played nice in the semi's, fell apart in the finals...Ortmann had destroyed everyone in that tourn. up to then, running over a hundred in 2 previous matches, {grady and Staton}...Oliver also ran 100 several times at the billiard cafe during the week...if you can find these video's {I have them all!} there great to watch, Oliver plays with reckless abandon! He's young and he gets a little ahead of himself but he's a lesson in the loose fast Eddie style...if 14.1 was played that way more often it would be great T.V....nothing quite like watching a guy run a hundred thirty when your down 89 to 2!

Deeman3
02-14-2007, 08:59 AM
Fran,

As usual great advice. 14.1 as well as One Pocket muct be aquired as much as learned. I think many of us have built what we have on these great games. It's so hard to describe how gentle nudging outplays one big blast but when it hits you, you'll make bigger steps.

DeeMan

Fran Crimi
02-14-2007, 09:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr> I saw Steve Mizerak play a young German (someone suggested it was Oliver Ortman but I honestly don't remember his name...he lost to Mizerak) in the US Open at the Pick Congress Hotel - Chicago back in the mid 80's and they played straight pool, race to 150. I believe that is the same as what in now called 14.1.....am I correct on that?
Any way....that was the event that hooked me on pool. I was a typical bar room type slammer at that time and those 2 guys showed me what pool should look like when played right.
I have been intrigued by the game ever since and as most of the members of this board know I consider myself a student of the game. I don't have the raw talent that I see many players have and what I have achieved has been from plain old hard work and persistence. I play OK but am awed by players who have the coveted raw talent....wow!...they just don't always appreciate just how great of a thing that is. <hr /></blockquote>

Well, you don't want to watch a race to 150 in 14.1. That would mean that the first person who won 150 games wins the set. You may starve to death watching that one. But you might want to watch a 150 point game. That only lasts a couple of hours, often less.

Actually, the Miz was one of the harder breakers in the game. Sometimes he struck the pack softly but he didn't like to waste too much time bumping them around. He often got the rack open in about 2 or three breaks, sometimes even 1, as opposed to others who took 5 or 6 tries.

Petey Margo was the guy who got me hooked on playing. He was a great shotmaker was famous for getting out of impossible situations. I loved watching him play.

Fran

BigRigTom
02-14-2007, 09:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dutchboy:</font><hr> The year was 89, is was Ortmann, he lost to Steve in the semi's but beat him in the finals, 200 to 186. Steve played nice in the semi's, fell apart in the finals...Ortmann had destroyed everyone in that tourn. up to then, running over a hundred in 2 previous matches, {grady and Staton}...Oliver also ran 100 several times at the billiard cafe during the week...if you can find these video's {I have them all!} there great to watch, Oliver plays with reckless abandon! He's young and he gets a little ahead of himself but he's a lesson in the loose fast Eddie style...if 14.1 was played that way more often it would be great T.V....nothing quite like watching a guy run a hundred thirty when your down 89 to 2! <hr /></blockquote>

Wow!
Thanks Dutchboy! That all sounds right to me. All I have to go on is my memory and my memory is a bit choppy.
Can you tell me the score of the match in which Steve won that semi final?

I have been telling my friends about watching that in person ever since and like the "fish tell" I think I have maybe made some embellishments in the story over the years.
I do remember clearly that young German who played fast and loose as you described.

dutchboy
02-14-2007, 11:57 AM
Miz beat him 150-55 in the semi...Ortmann folded under the pressure...came back on the loser side to beat Varner. Sigel ran 150 and out on Rempe in that tourn.
What's great about these tapes is you get to hear Danny Di Liberto, Sigel,Pretty boy Floyd {Jimmy Mataya} Jeff Carter and others give expert commentary...I've learned more about the game from listening to their words as much as watching them play. But I gotta tell ya, watching Ortmann is inspiring...even at a young age...he was only 22.

BigRigTom
02-14-2007, 12:19 PM
Thanks again....and again that is how I remember that match. I also seem to remember that there was only 1 bank shot and the Miz banked a ball cross side and did it as though it was an automatic and absoulutely had to go in. I remember wondering if he can do that then, why did he avoid the banks at other times when they would have been just as "automatic". Keep in mind that at the time I had no idea the the positioning of the cue ball was the more important goal.

The Miz walked around the table softly tapping in balls with great finesse then Ortmann would walk up and drill ball after ball into the pocket like there was a time limit on how long he could stay at the table. It was great to watch and like I said before... IT SOLD ME on the game. Here I am 28 years later still talking about it....even the moon landing did not make that much of an impression on me!