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roberteggleton
02-14-2007, 05:41 PM
I'm a therapist in a children's mental health program. I thought that some might find it interesting that I use pool as a technique to teach youth a model of good decision-making. The session starts with the kids drawing balls scattered on the table. I emphasize with each how he or she didn't get the break in life. Most are victims of child abuse, molestation, mental illness, etc. I then instruct them to call their best shot. The exercise has several steps leading to each child earning the break for the next game.

"Rarity from the Hollow"
(my novel with author proceeds donated to prevent child maltreatment -- let me know if you have any questions about the project: robert_t@charter.net)

rangoonkid
02-14-2007, 06:15 PM

Sid_Vicious
02-14-2007, 06:46 PM
I doubt that is the intent, besides those challenged kids merely need something to be excited about, and "working" a table out might just be the avenue to learning. Besides, it makes it fun. I will agree that pool can lead to decadance(sp?), yet it is rewarding in it's short term rewards. I applaud the effort as stated in the original post. Any effort is worth it..sid

DeadCrab
02-14-2007, 06:55 PM
Billiards is an exercise in problem solving, and certainly has the potential for therapeutic value in many settings.

I have had some involvement in introducing autistic kids to pool, and they really take to it. It can be done in a non-competitive environment, strengthens motor planning, social skills, and hand-eye coordination. It is also a great avocation for persons with physical disabilities.

The down side is that acceptance with or understanding by the "pool hall crowd" is not likely forthcoming, nor is it necessarily desirable (vide supra).

Stretch
02-14-2007, 07:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr>
Billiards is an exercise in problem solving, and certainly has the potential for therapeutic value in many settings.

I have had some involvement in introducing autistic kids to pool, and they really take to it. It can be done in a non-competitive environment, strengthens motor planning, social skills, and hand-eye coordination. It is also a great avocation for persons with physical disabilities.

The down side is that acceptance with or understanding by the "pool hall crowd" is not likely forthcoming, nor is it necessarily desirable (vide supra).

<hr /></blockquote>

I think it's a great idea myself. Pool is fun, it has it's own rewards so it's something that should be enjoyed by anyone that can pick up a stick. It's true that main stream and professional organised Pool might have a problem with accepting disabilities. But on the whole i think it would be no more a problem with that then the NBA ever fearing wheelchair basketball. Participation is what it's all about. Heck i'd even let the blind play, might have a chance that way. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Moe Norman in golf was borderline autistic and it was probably his inability to fit in with the other pros. and his attitude towards the public that cost him true greatness. He was also painfully shy and absolutely no good with money. But hit balls?!! Hey, he was a genius. St.

Snapshot9
02-15-2007, 09:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote roberteggleton:</font><hr> I'm a therapist in a children's mental health program. I thought that some might find it interesting that I use pool as a technique to teach youth a model of good decision-making. The session starts with the kids drawing balls scattered on the table. I emphasize with each how he or she didn't get the break in life. Most are victims of child abuse, molestation, mental illness, etc. I then instruct them to call their best shot. The exercise has several steps leading to each child earning the break for the next game.

"Rarity from the Hollow"
(my novel with author proceeds donated to prevent child maltreatment -- let me know if you have any questions about the project: robert_t@charter.net) <hr /></blockquote>

I think that is a good idea, and it conditions them mentally to take a logic approach, whether it be for Pool or life.
Learning about computers also is good, and I am not talking about playing games, but to make them do something that is productive. Learning how to analyze and program a computer program or system can be a valuable tool for navigating in life.

Billy_Bob
02-15-2007, 09:33 AM
Historically, billiards has been played in mental hospitals because it was thought to be therapeutic for the patients.

Also who needs a "personality test" to learn about a person's personality or character? Watch them play a few games of pool and it reveals a lot!

-Are they patient or impatient?
-Do they plan ahead?
-Destructive - tend to damage equipment?
-Self-centered or giving type person?
-Do they cheat/lie or play by the rules?
-Are they a sore loser?
-Have issues with anger? (losing, missing shots)
-Substance abuse problems / gambling (playing in bar).
-Etc.

I have a pool table at my house and will not invite anyone to my home until I have seen them play a few games of pool in a public setting. I watch some people play a few games and decide with a quickness that I don't want them at my house.

Basically I invite good sports, people who play by the rules, and those who respect the equipment (my house) and will not destroy things. I prefer serious players who want to learn about the game, but also invite people who just like to have fun.