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canadan
03-09-2007, 08:07 PM
how do you play with them? I look over them I'm near sighted not to bad. long shots are blurry.But I always line up my cue before I go down to shoot. and I can adjust and still make a high percentage shot. My stance I like to have my chin on my cue so I have to look over my glasses tryed a more stand up shot but cant find the sweet spot. What do you do?

caedos
03-09-2007, 09:15 PM
Most people with glasses make some serious adjustments if they are going to play very often or very well. When someone looks at an object through a lens and then changes to another lens (as in bifocals) or no lens at all, the object can appear to be in a different place due to the shift in refraction index. Players with glasses should take care to approach each shot the same way so that they are guaging angles and distances the same way every time. I wore them for over twenty years, and my shooting glasses were normal glasses with big lenses so that I could maintain single lens vision while moving through the different shooting and standing positions. Many players are starting to use shooting glasses (as in skeet and target), such as those made by Ducott and Zeiss. If you elect to do this, please make sure you get them made for your Pupillary Distance, a prescription from two through ten feet, and a high optical-center (for when you are bent over shooting you are looking through the upper half of the lens). I have had several students over the years claiming that small lens glasses force them to shoot in strained neck positions, often causing pain.

Good luck!

Carl

caedos
03-09-2007, 09:18 PM
Most people with glasses make some serious adjustments if they are going to play very often or very well. When someone looks at an object through a lens and then changes to another lens (as in bifocals) or no lens at all, the object can appear to be in a different place due to the shift in refraction index. Players with glasses should take care to approach each shot the same way so that they are guaging angles and distances the same way every time. I wore them for over twenty years, and my shooting glasses were normal glasses with big lenses so that I could maintain single lens vision while moving through the different shooting and standing positions. Many players are starting to use shooting glasses (as in skeet and target), such as those made by Ducott and Zeiss. If you elect to do this, please make sure you get them made for your Pupillary Distance, a prescription from two through ten feet, and a high optical-center (for when you are bent over shooting you are looking through the upper half of the lens). I have had several students over the years claiming that small lens glasses force them to shoot in strained neck positions, often causing pain.

Good luck!

Carl

canadan
03-09-2007, 11:58 PM
ya thats why I just look over them I thin I have good preception of the object ball

trob
03-10-2007, 03:45 AM
I always take them off when playing because it kills my kneck. I recently just came back to the game after a couple year lay off and realized that the old eyes are going down hill a bit. I'm thinking of getting contacts. I can't play with glasses on. It kills my kneck and I just end up stareing over the top of them.

DeadCrab
03-10-2007, 07:20 AM
The current style of glasses, with small oval or rectangular lenses are terrible for pool, and just about everything else as well.

The big lenses, popular in the late 80's and 90's are what you want, and without bifocals. For example: Paul Newman wore some oversize lenses in The Color of Money.

Rich R.
03-10-2007, 07:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeadCrab:</font><hr>
The current style of glasses, with small oval or rectangular lenses are terrible for pool, and just about everything else as well.

The big lenses, popular in the late 80's and 90's are what you want, and without bifocals. For example: Paul Newman wore some oversize lenses in The Color of Money. <hr /></blockquote>
If you have to wear glasses to play, I recommend taking Carl's advise. Get a pair of Ducott frames and have the lenses made especially for pool. The Ducott frames have an adjustable nose bridge and can be custom fitted to your shooting position. They also have large lenses, as you recommended.

canadan
03-10-2007, 10:32 AM
Maybe i'll try fliping my glasses upside down

Rod
03-10-2007, 11:58 AM
I've never heard of Ducott glasses. I think what they meant to suggest was Decot. I have a pair and although better than most I was never able to adapt. I am a stand up player unlike you with your chin on the cue. I'd never be able to play with glasses in that position. All I can think of is a sore neck in the process. Of course the term rubber neck could help here. LOL

Rod

ceebee
03-11-2007, 07:02 PM
I have modified my own glasses, easy to do with a vise.

I first rotated the temple locations on lens frame. I then bent the temples (about an inch back of the connection) to a 20+ degree angle.

I then modified the nose pieces to support the lens higher on my nose.

The modified glasses work well. I can actually look normally (90 degrees) through the lens. That's all a blind man can ask for.

Any off-angle view through the lens, causes an aberration of the real image.

Anyone that wants a picture can PM me.

Good Luck...

SPetty
03-11-2007, 07:43 PM
I'd recommend just taking off your glasses. I require glasses to be able to see for driving and such, and I can't see the balls real clear, but I would rather shoot without my glasses than with my glasses. Really, just take them off. Try it.

cushioncrawler
03-11-2007, 08:29 PM
I used to uze shooting glasses with thoze adjustable nose-pads. They were the same prescription az my street glasses, but every time i put them on the ballz looked liked eggs for an hour or so. Got sick of them.

Nowadayz i just uze my street glasses, but i have them bent and turned etc so that they are about halfway to what i would like to play with. I have the nose-pads bent around etc, and the glasses turned around a bit and twisted, and the ear-arms bent different. This way i can tolerate them for street use, and for playing, without continually having to make temporary adjustments, and without having to tote a second set. My eyes have grown used to the glasses, but i guess that i "look" a bit qeer (qeerer). madMac.

allstar
03-11-2007, 09:02 PM
I am far sighted as hell. Get yourself a strap for the glasses that will allow you to wear them tighter and look threw and not over the lenses. It can be uncomfortable but you can see.

NBC-BOB
03-14-2007, 09:58 AM
Over the past 10 yrs I've had several pairs of glasses made for me, and the last 5 yrs I have a pair with progressive lens that I think are the best. They have the anti glare option and the lenses are just large enough so that I'm always looking through the lense.I also use the same glasses when at work for looking at the computer screen.

bob

NH_Steve
03-14-2007, 11:05 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> I've never heard of Ducott glasses. I think what they meant to suggest was Decot. I have a pair and although better than most I was never able to adapt. I am a stand up player unlike you with your chin on the cue. I'd never be able to play with glasses in that position. All I can think of is a sore neck in the process. Of course the term rubber neck could help here. LOL

Rod <hr /></blockquote>Yes, Decot is the name. That is what I began using about two years ago. They are nice and big and sit tall -- it is wonderful to be able to see the balls! Whoever said to just take off your glasses &amp; shoot is wrong -- if you can get the right perscription for the 2 feet to 10 feet range.

My oversized glasses do get lots of good natured laughs at the poolroom (still) but it sure beats not being able to see!!!

Decot's web site:
http://www.sportglasses.com/content/info_billiards.asp

wolfdancer
03-14-2007, 11:15 AM
This might work for me...using a white cue, with a red band on it.....do they allow you to tap the table with the cue, to feel where the balls are?