PDA

View Full Version : Custom vs. Production Cues



dusmur
03-30-2007, 05:51 PM
Okay, I'm still in a quandry regarding purchasing a cue. From my other posts, and what I've read in the forum, there are those that like production cues, such as MacDermott, Predator, etc., etc. There are others that seem to only go with custom-made cues. I realize this is a matter of personal preference...what cue feels good to what person. I would like to spark a discussion of why some go w/ custom, others production.

I'd also like some advice: I've been playing for over 10 years, and have had only one cue (a graphite, which got me by, sort of).

Is it worth getting a custom made cue for my second?

Would someone order a custom without first having played/tried that maker's cues?

Should I just buy a 'cheapie' (looking at Viking Sneaky Pete, or Lucasi Sneaky Pete)?

My budget is under $250, otherwise I'd pick up a Predator.

Any info regarding this would be most helpful.

Cornerman
03-30-2007, 06:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dusmur:</font><hr> My budget is under $250, otherwise I'd pick up a Predator.

Any info regarding this would be most helpful. <hr /></blockquote>I would go ahead and buy a "production cue." And I'd buy it online from the Billiardwarehouse.com. And I'd buy a JOSS.

The other production cue I'd recommend is a Huebler Sneaky Pete, but they're getting harder to come by.

Fred &lt;~~~ and that's about it

P.S., at the billiardwarehouse.com, they're selling BW cues, made especially for them. For $199, you get a lot of cue.

dusmur
03-30-2007, 06:16 PM
What is it about the Joss and Heubler cues that you like?

jjinfla
03-30-2007, 06:26 PM
What "custom" cue can you purchase for under $250? Or was that a typo and you just forgot the extra zero?

Jake

dusmur
03-30-2007, 06:34 PM
Perhaps I'm misusing this term. There's a cue maker in/near Denver that will make a cue to my specifications. As my specs are pretty normal (i.e., no inlays, just custom length, weight, etc.), I can get a cue for around $250 thru them.
Is this not the same as a custom made, or custom, cue?

scaramouche
03-30-2007, 08:18 PM
There is absolutely no correlation between the price of your cue and your performance.

The cue I always use is the cheapest one I own, the bottom of the line. I let the visitors play with the more expensive stuff.

It is much fun to win with a production cue, beating the players with custom cues. It is much embarrassment to be the player with the overpriced cue: you run the risk of being identified as having more money than talent.

Bob_Jewett
03-30-2007, 08:57 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dusmur:</font><hr> Perhaps I'm misusing this term. There's a cue maker in/near Denver that will make a cue to my specifications. As my specs are pretty normal (i.e., no inlays, just custom length, weight, etc.), I can get a cue for around $250 thru them. .. <hr /></blockquote>
The term "custom" is a hot button for some people -- it's a warm button for me. With a "true" custom cue, you specify things like the butt diameter, shaft taper, joint construction, ferrule type, length, balance, weight, etc. Well, you might have to go with standard features if you want to keep the price down. No Icelandic caribou antler ferrule. But you are specifying the major characteristics.

A lot of mass-market cue manufacturers seem to feel that if they offer ten forearm designs and three wraps and three weights, they are offering "custom" cues. Just as Walmart offers "custom" shoes.

I think you should go with your local guy. He can also help you choose the various parameters that are important to you. As far as getting a Predator, your local guy might be able to make you a low-squirt shaft if you ask, for not much increase in price.

dusmur
03-30-2007, 09:54 PM
Unfortunately, the maker I refer to in Denver is not local. In fact, there is nothing local to me. I live in a very remote area; the nearest pool-dedicated store is a 3.5 hour drive (one way) from me. So, this would be an online purchase for me.

I want nothing fancy in my new cue. I want solid construction, reliability, and comfort. No inlays needed, no exotic woods, no ivory, etc.

I realize this is admitting my ignorance, but Predators are known for low-squirt? That is something I'm looking for...

Bob_Jewett
03-30-2007, 10:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dusmur:</font><hr> ... I realize this is admitting my ignorance, but Predators are known for low-squirt? ... <hr /></blockquote>
Yes, for many players the low-squirt characteristics of Predators is their main useful feature. If you presently use a high-squirt cue, and you use a lot of side spin, be prepared for an adjustment period if you change over.

dusmur
03-30-2007, 10:33 PM
Hmm...my previous cue was graphite, which would lead me to believe it was fairly non-squirt'y'. I tend to use a lot of side english in my games...and having used only one cue previously (besides house cues), I haven't much experience with testing levels of 'squirtyness'. I just assumed it was something I wanted to avoid at my current skill level.

I realize my comments/questions are extremely mundane and pedantic in this forum...but I greatly appreciate the input I've been receiving, and hope those 'old-timers' and experienced ones out there will (continue) to throw in their two cents.

Cornerman
03-31-2007, 06:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dusmur:</font><hr> Hmm...my previous cue was graphite, which would lead me to believe it was fairly non-squirt'y'. I tend to use a lot of side english in my games...and having used only one cue previously (besides house cues), I haven't much experience with testing levels of 'squirtyness'. I just assumed it was something I wanted to avoid at my current skill level. <hr /></blockquote>Your previous graphite cue was most likely very squirty.

And to the earlier question as to what is it I like about JOSS and Huebler. I can't tell you. At least, whatever I tell you won't make any reasonable translation over the web lines. I won't tell you about joints and joint configuration, stiff or whippy hits, or any such nonsense. Most people who try to explain it will disagree with what "stiff" means to them to begin with, so the discussion becomes a mess.

Anyway, I really like them. I can't say that about any other mass produced cue.

Fred

Billy_Bob
03-31-2007, 07:57 AM
I have my own specifications for the cue I use.

My cue could be a production cue with those specifications or a custom cue with the same specifications.

Both would play exactly the same!

Both are manufactured using the same manufacturing equipment.

So long as the cue is to my specifications, I don't care if it is off the shelf, or I ordered it from the manufacturer and they made one with what I wanted, or I went to a cue maker and had one made.

Of course I will look for the same thing for the lowest price.

For my cue, I want my...
weight (has adjustable weight bolt), joint, Predator 314 low deflection shaft (which comes with radial laminated shaft, pro taper, and 12.75 shaft size at tip), and a pig skin (Moori) hard dime shaped tip.

As it turns out, I can buy this "off the shelf" on the internet. I don't care what the butt of the cue looks like except for color. I could care less if it has any fancy designs on the butt.

I'm more concerned with the weight and the "business end" of the cue - (shaft/tip).

Snapshot9
03-31-2007, 10:30 AM
I would go for custom because after playing 45 years most of them with production cues, the very best I would classify them is good, but with customs, you go onto 'Super Good' and 'Excellent'. Schon is the only production/custom? cue I would buy now.

Bob Owen of Shurtz Custom Cues entry level cue is $250, with choice of 4 woods, joint, and Irish Linen wrap, but he keeps this model in Inventory. He is in Wichita, where I am.
Shurtz Custom Cues (http://www.Shurtzcue.com)
Click on Cues, then look at the top cue in the window on the left, and click on the model number to see the whole cue as an example of his entry custom.

jayzoll
03-31-2007, 12:11 PM
I too would definately go custom. First cue I ever bought was a no namer from pool city for about $150. It is every bit of junk and you can feel it in the hit. Next cue I bought was a Muecci. Another piece of firewood I sold about 2 months later. I then bought a nice Schon. I played with this for about one year and ventured into the custom market. Currently, I now own 3 customs and continue to buy one per year. I will probably never own another production cue. Afterall, they are all made of the same materials, so is there really a difference? I think so...many others may disagree, but I think you get much more cue from a custom maker vs. a production.

I have hit Joss, Vikings, McDermotts, all play pretty good, but none comparable to any of the customs I've played with. All 100% american made, so your supporting american families. Much more time and effort is put forth in construction of a custom and you can definately tell the difference in hit. If I was in your situation, I'd consider that Schurtz for $250. If you've waited ten years, I'd wait a little longer and save up about $500-600 which will only open up your options for many other great custom maker 'plane jane's'. Especially coming from a graphite cue, you will be very satisfied with whatever you decide to buy. My "no-brainer" decision--roll with a custom

glau
04-01-2007, 01:57 PM
If you are any good at pool, you should be able to cut off the end of a broomstick and glue a LePro or Triangle tip to it. That would do just as well as any custom or production cue!

trob
04-01-2007, 02:14 PM
and that has to do with what? Should all the pro players give up there cues and start playing with broom sticks because it's all the same? I can play fine with a house cue...but I find the game to be more enjoyable with a nice custom cue. 20 years of playing this game and the broom stick statement just sounds dumber every time I hear it.

Cornerman
04-01-2007, 02:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote glau:</font><hr> If you are any good at pool, you should be able to cut off the end of a broomstick and glue a LePro or Triangle tip to it. That would do just as well as any custom or production cue! <hr /></blockquote>This is a bunch of bullshit.

Fred

Billy_Bob
04-02-2007, 06:51 AM
Also when someone says any good pro can shoot well with any stick, that's fine and dandy.

But most people are not pros and will do better to always play with the same stick.

Sig
04-02-2007, 11:19 AM
I was just curious, do you think a significant number of people use Predator or similar shafts for their custom cues? In which case, isn't the butt fairly insignificant in terms of how it plays?

Billy_Bob
04-02-2007, 11:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sig:</font><hr> I was just curious, do you think a significant number of people use Predator or similar shafts for their custom cues? In which case, isn't the butt fairly insignificant in terms of how it plays? <hr /></blockquote>

I don't know the answer to the first question. But I did take my off-the-shelf cues to a custom cue maker a couple of years ago to have some work done. I talked to him a bit about Predator shafts. I got the impression that most of his customers did not use Predator shafts, but quite a few did. A lot of things can change in two years though. I recently heard Predator has a backlog of orders now. So ??

Then I live in a small town. I would guess there are about 100 players around here who have their own cues. And there are only 3 players (including myself) who have Predator shafts. Note they don't sell them around here, so the numbers might be different where you can buy these easily in local retail stores?

So far as the butt, I have my own accurate scale and have noticed that many cues which say 19 oz are actually 18 or 20 oz! If the butt has a weight bolt, I can adjust the weight to be exactly my weight.

So weight bolt / adjustable weight important. Then some players like to have a certain balance. You can do this by how far up the butt you screw in the weight bolt. (That sounds nasty, but I don't know how else to word it!)

Then the joint. I prefer a quick release UniLoc joint. Also some people have sweaty hands and prefer a wrap.

But other than that, it makes no difference to me what the butt looks like so long as it is not a weird color. And other than the above weight/balance/wrap, in my opinion, the butt has very little to do with how the cue plays.

Billy_Bob
04-02-2007, 11:57 AM
Also the total length of the cue. Taller people might prefer a longer cue. Kids a shorter cue.

SpiderMan
04-02-2007, 12:00 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote glau:</font><hr> If you are any good at pool, you should be able to cut off the end of a broomstick and glue a LePro or Triangle tip to it. That would do just as well as any custom or production cue! <hr /></blockquote>

That sucker bet only works on really bad players and beginners. I can't think of anyone I've ever played that would beat me if forced to shoot with a broomstick.

SpiderMan

dusmur
04-02-2007, 11:07 PM
Billy_Bob--

I'm 6'5", have gorilla-like arms, and find that while using any 'standard' 58" cue, I've got to grip the butt end well below the wrap...basically at the very butt of the cue. I have, of course, adapted to this over the years, but would like something designed more to my freakishness. I'm looking for at least 60", possibly more...unfortunately, I then get into the realm of custom cases, which can cost at least 2/3 of the cue itself. Seems an awful lot for a measly case. I hate to limit my custom cue with this aspect, but also can't seem to justify the cost of the case.
I know soft cases are often oversized...but I might as well wrap my cue in a beach towel...each would give about the same protection.

I'm having the custom maker I'm thinking of going with check out their case selection to find the longest case available.

And to respond to the earlier broomstick post...I agree with everyone else's comments. Looks to me like someone's just trying to ruffle feathers. I can play with the butt end of my cue, or just hit the ball with the bridge every time and do decently. But what's the fun in that?? Might as well use my schlong, eh?? Glue a tip on that?!?

BTW, how does one insert the 'quote' into one's post? Haven't figured that out yet...

Thanks again for all the info and input!!

-Dustin

Billy_Bob
04-03-2007, 08:06 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dusmur:</font><hr>...BTW, how does one insert the 'quote' into one's post? Haven't figured that out yet...<hr /></blockquote>

Click on Quote on the post you want the quote included from. Then type your reply below the quote.

bsmutz
04-03-2007, 10:38 AM
I play with a 60" cue and it fits just fine into any normal cue case with room to spare. I don't think you need a custom case. It is a production cue from Schmelke, but I think there are a few production makers that can make a longer cue. It seems like most production makers offer more options than most retailers offer. I think it's because the retailers buy a quantity of cues that have already been made to stock their stores with (on-line or locally). If you contact the manufacturer directly or find a store that is willing to work with the manufacturer to get you the cue you want, you can get a custom length and weight as well as laminated shafts and tips for little or no extra money. You can also get a selection of weight bolts so you can experiment to find out what you like best.

Snapshot9
04-03-2007, 11:05 AM
Dsmur .... No, you can get one to accomodate the cue with room to spare (JP's). I bought one off of Pooldawg.com that is a 3 x 5 case (also comes in 2 x 4 and 4 x 8) that can handle a 63" cue without a problem, tubes, fit either way, spring loaded butts, good shoulder strap and handle for $85. I have had mine a year and a half, and like it better than any case I have had, especially for convenience. Jump butt pocket too. Free shipping over $50.

Look down page for Elite Nexus 3 x 5:

Elite Nexus case (http://www.pooldawg.com/category/2/hard-cases)

don_southwick
04-03-2007, 11:09 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote scaramouche:</font><hr> There is absolutely no correlation between the price of your cue and your performance.

The cue I always use is the cheapest one I own, the bottom of the line. I let the visitors play with the more expensive stuff.

It is much fun to win with a production cue, beating the players with custom cues. It is much embarrassment to be the player with the overpriced cue: you run the risk of being identified as having more money than talent. <hr /></blockquote>

Maybe in your imagination. I personally wouldn't be embarrassed at all. No offense, but I think the idea it's somehow more noble to play with a cheap stick kind of silly.

There are just as many guys out there playing badly with production cues, so that kind of lays waste to the theory that everyone who plays with a custom cue is a bum. And I don't worry about having "more money than talent". Heck, I have a T-shirt that says it.

Bob_Jewett
04-03-2007, 11:58 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cornerman:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote glau:</font><hr> If you are any good at pool, you should be able to cut off the end of a broomstick and glue a LePro or Triangle tip to it. That would do just as well as any custom or production cue! <hr /></blockquote>This is a bunch of bullshit. ... Fred <hr /></blockquote>
I think glau was pulling our collective leg, or he is horribly confused. I'll give him the benefit of the doubt.

glau
04-10-2007, 08:51 AM
Finally, someone notices a joke. In all seriousness, I have had production cues by Balabushka by Adam Cue Co., Joss, Meucci, McDermott, Schmelke, Cuetec. They all play all right, with solid materials and once you are used to a particular cue, play consistently.

I also have a custom cue by a local maker, Richard Chudy out of Emeryville, CA. This by far is my favorite cue because no matter when I pick it up after using one of my production cues for weeks on end, the custom cue feels so sweet--like an extension of my shootin arm.

Anyway, good luck finding your own perfect cue.

Cornerman
04-10-2007, 09:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote glau:</font><hr> I also have a custom cue by a local maker, Richard Chudy out of Emeryville, CA. <hr /></blockquote>FWIW, Richard is my subject for the May/June '07 Issue.

Fred

scaramouche
04-14-2007, 05:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote don_southwick:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote scaramouche:</font><hr> There is absolutely no correlation between the price of your cue and your performance.

The cue I always use is the cheapest one I own, the bottom of the line. I let the visitors play with the more expensive stuff.

It is much fun to win with a production cue, beating the players with custom cues. It is much embarrassment to be the player with the overpriced cue: you run the risk of being identified as having more money than talent. <hr /></blockquote>

Maybe in your imagination. I personally wouldn't be embarrassed at all. No offense, but I think the idea it's somehow more noble to play with a cheap stick kind of silly.

There are just as many guys out there playing badly with production cues, so that kind of lays waste to the theory that everyone who plays with a custom cue is a bum. And I don't worry about having "more money than talent". Heck, I have a T-shirt that says it.

<hr /></blockquote>

Over on AZ this comment has been recently posted:

I remember a long time ago, when I had a low end Meucci, and one day I walk into the pool
room, and there is a used Meucci Road Agent in the display case. I ask the owner for the
price, and he comes back with "You just bought a brand new Meucci a few weeks ago, why do
you want a different one already?". So, I tell him that I saw that same one in the catalog and
liked the design, and since it was more expensive, I thought it would be a better cue, and
might help my game out. He said some words I'll never forget:

"It might make you *look* like a better player, but it won't make you *shoot* like a better player."

don_southwick
04-16-2007, 02:41 PM
I agreed with the first paragraph of your first post. It was the third paragraph that's baloney. The custom guys don't give a hoot whether you think they spent too much money or not.

trob
04-17-2007, 02:03 PM
I agree it won't make you play better BUT if you look good..you feel good..If you feel good you will be more confident and mentaly may play better. Dress for success.

sygfrid
04-18-2007, 11:21 AM
It is like driving a race car &amp; an ordinary sedan; anyone can just drive them around. HOWEVER, only a skilled driver can truly push these cars to their limits and bring out the REAL POWER in the race car.

An experienced player can distinguish a great cue vs an ordinary one. Like a race car, a great cue can HELP you make difficult shots EASIER with a lot LESS EFFORT than you'd normally would with an ordinary cue. The thing is, YOU MUST KNOW WHAT TO DO &amp; HOW TO DO IT.

Remember, SKILLS comes first, EQUIPMENT comes second.

mantis
04-18-2007, 07:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote trob:</font><hr> I agree it won't make you play better BUT if you look good..you feel good..If you feel good you will be more confident and mentaly may play better. Dress for success. <hr /></blockquote>

Hopefully your confidence needs don't cost you a few thousand dollars. Realising that it really is not the cue but the player will help your confidence when playing with a regular cue. On the other hand, if you buy an expensive cue and your game does not improve, what will happen to your confidence. Maybe a new cue will inspiire more practice and play which will make you better.


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sygfrid:</font><hr> It is like driving a race car &amp; an ordinary sedan; anyone can just drive them around. HOWEVER, only a skilled driver can truly push these cars to their limits and bring out the REAL POWER in the race car.

An experienced player can distinguish a great cue vs an ordinary one. Like a race car, a great cue can HELP you make difficult shots EASIER with a lot LESS EFFORT than you'd normally would with an ordinary cue. The thing is, YOU MUST KNOW WHAT TO DO &amp; HOW TO DO IT.

Remember, SKILLS comes first, EQUIPMENT comes second.
<hr /></blockquote>

Besides having a good tip, I really disagree with this statement. I do not profess to be that good, but in trying different cues, and believing that they would make a big difference, I basically found that one cue will make the ball do basically the same thing as another, it is just the feel that is different when it does it.

ryushen21
04-18-2007, 10:27 PM
here's my 2c on the whole issue. As was mentioned previously, a true custom cue gets into a whole lot more technical issues like butt diameter, joint material, joint pin, balance, length etc. So unless you really want to get that specific, you may not need a custom cue.

IMO, most people go for a custom designed cue because they want a specific type of wood or exotic inlays or things like that. And they are wiling to pay the price to have the exact design that they want and having that "unique"cue that you can't get with production cues.

That being said, I think a lot more goes to the shaft of the cue. You can very easily buy a $100 cue and throw a predator or other shaft of your choice on there and get good performance out of it. And from what i have seen a lot of players choose that option, otherwise there would not be as big of a custom shaft market as there is.

I currently shoot with a Mezz (Japanese equivalent of Schon) with a OB-1 shaft. It hits exactly the way that I like and I am comfortable playing with it. And to me, that is the most important thing to look at when you are considering a cue purchase.

trob
04-19-2007, 02:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ryushen21:</font><hr> here's my 2c on the whole issue. As was mentioned previously, a true custom cue gets into a whole lot more technical issues like butt diameter, joint material, joint pin, balance, length etc. So unless you really want to get that specific, you may not need a custom cue.

IMO, most people go for a custom designed cue because they want a specific type of wood or exotic inlays or things like that. And they are wiling to pay the price to have the exact design that they want and having that "unique"cue that you can't get with production cues.

That being said, I think a lot more goes to the shaft of the cue. You can very easily buy a $100 cue and throw a predator or other shaft of your choice on there and get good performance out of it. And from what i have seen a lot of players choose that option, otherwise there would not be as big of a custom shaft market as there is.

I currently shoot with a Mezz (Japanese equivalent of Schon) with a OB-1 shaft. It hits exactly the way that I like and I am comfortable playing with it. And to me, that is the most important thing to look at when you are considering a cue purchase. <hr /></blockquote>

I have to agree...I think I could put my ob1 cue on a kmart cue and it would play good.

sygfrid
04-24-2007, 06:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mantis:</font><hr>Besides having a good tip, I really disagree with this statement. I do not profess to be that good, but in trying different cues, and believing that they would make a big difference, I basically found that one cue will make the ball do basically the same thing as another, it is just the feel that is different when it does it. <hr /></blockquote>

Sorry, I think my comment seemed to imply that a good cue can make "wonders" /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

What I meant was regardless of stiffness, density, deflection, etc of different cues, it is true that any cue can make a cb spin, draw, follow, etc. However, high quality cues should be able to HELP you adjust or compensate, like for English, a lot less than with an ordinary cue, and it should help you deliver a shot a lot easier by letting you execute it with less effort/power.

High-quality cues, through both of the QUALITY OF MATERIALS used &amp; the CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES applied,
should help you deliver shots with a lot less effort/power as it is able to transform almost all of the Potential Energy into Kinetic Energy

I've tried different cues, thanks to my friends, from the low class to the high-end ones. I noticed that even with the same amount of power and tip used, drawing the cb with a high quality cue makes the ball travel a lot longer than with an ordinary cue.

Don't get me wrong, you can find cheap cues that play as great as the high-end ones. Although the incidence of finding one is rare since the choice of quality materials &amp; the use of construction techniques for these are not as meticulously done as the high-quality production or custom makers do. That's why you get a good cue with CONSISTENT characteristics like playability with the high-ends. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

BLACKHEART
04-24-2007, 10:01 AM
Don't confuse "high end" with quallity. The hit on my $300 BLACK HEART'S is the same as those costing $2000. I use the same assembly proceedures &amp; basic materials to make both. The difference being the cost of the inlays,points , gold, silver, ivory etc. I know this is true, with all custom Qmakers...JER

MrLucky
04-24-2007, 10:09 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> Don't confuse "high end" with quallity. The hit on my $300 BLACK HEART'S is the same as those costing $2000. I use the same assembly proceedures &amp; basic materials to make both. The difference being the cost of the inlays,points , gold, silver, ivory etc. I know this is true, with all custom Qmakers...JER <hr /></blockquote>

I would agree that in my experience with quality Cues and Makers Lines they all are similar in hit and feel! but I do have a question, since the additional points inlays etcetera on higher priced cues are even maybe subtlety changing the harmonics and density of the woods they are added or applied to would not this contribute to subtle differences between them ? Or in your opinion if these do exist would it make a noticeable difference? /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Dagwood
04-24-2007, 11:09 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>

And other than the above weight/balance/wrap, in my opinion, the butt has very little to do with how the cue plays.
<hr /></blockquote>

I can't really agree with that statement. From my experience, if you take 2 cues, (or more...but for the sake of discussion just 2), from the same cue maker. One has a Maple (birdseye or curly) forearm, and one with an ebony forearm, you'll find that the hit is quite a bit different. This is aside from the fact that the balance point (in an uncored cue) is drastically different. The different densities in the wood transfer the vibrations of the cue ball impact to a greater or lesser degree depending on the wood. The same goes for the butt sleeve, to a lesser degree, as your hand feels the energy from the impact before it gets there.

Granted, I also believe that what people take out of the "hit" of the cue has more to do with physiology and how you interpret the vibrations than the actual vibrations themselves. Everyone will have different opinions about how a cue "hits". This is why I feel it's important to find a cue maker or production cue that fits you and your game.

As far as the rest of the discussion, I have to agree that the quality of the wood and construction will have alot to do with that hit.

Hope this helps...

Dags

mantis
04-24-2007, 03:23 PM
[when it does it. <hr /></blockquote>
effort/power.

High-quality cues, through both of the QUALITY OF MATERIALS used &amp; the CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES applied,
should help you deliver shots with a lot less effort/power as it is able to transform almost all of the Potential Energy into Kinetic Energy


Sygfrid,
I am not trying to pick on you, I just have not had the same experience. I have an older Walmart cue that has a decent tip, and then I have two other cues that are a few levels above the walmart cue. I have to say that I can draw with the Walmart cue just as well as the other two. I would say that the hit of the more expensive cues is more solid with less feedback, but that is about it. Each cue does feel quite different in solidity and stiffness, but they all make the ball do about the same thing.

mamono
04-24-2007, 07:47 PM
It's true that the impression that someone has regarding a cue is merely subjective, quality and grade of materials do play a factor. Personally, I shoot with a J&amp;J Cue #4414 (http://jjcue.com/jjcue-jumpbkcue.htm). I've had that cue for years and I find it to be great. Overall balance and hit is great, but not nearly as solid as my TADís yet I still continue to use it as my general shooting cue these past 11 years.

I have used TAD, Schon, Pechauer, J&amp;J, Lucasi, Joss, Dufferin, McDermott, and Cuetec as far as I can remember. That is my preference from beginning to end, but I would still pickup my J&amp;J if I were given an opportunity. Though to be honest, I would only select #4414 and #4410. I bought mine when they still used the standard ferrule and some cheap tip. I re-ferrule the shafts and put on triangle tips. Extra shafts are very inexpensive, a J&amp;J cue #4414 plus an extra shaft and case easily around ~$100. That is what I've always recommended to anyone looking to get their own cue and I continue to. At least here in LA because I live local to J&amp;J America, they're down the street from my favorite burger joint.

Anyways, as you can tell, this is a very controversial topic. Best advice would be to tell you to try different cues and find one that you like. Note characteristics about the cues like type of joint, woods used, weight, and whatever peculiarities that you can determine like type of ferrule and tips, etc etcÖ All of these affect how a cue feels. Some cuemakers or brands make their cues a certain way, using certain materials, and patented processes. Youíll want to make note of those. Once again, this is purely subjective.

Iím sure we could recommend to you all day long and tell you what are the good and bad of different cuemakers or brands, but that defeats the purpose when you can only decide for yourself what best fits you. Iím sure that everyone here can decide what best fits them and their own preference.

I could careless if a cue were fancy or not. I personally donít like fancy cues and would give anything for a cue that hits the way I love it. I would love to hit with my TAD all day long, but I personally donít like to get pestered so I just hit with the J&amp;J most of the time. Kind of nice to run tables on a $70 cueÖ But, you be the judge because ultimately its you who will be using that cue.

Dagwood
04-24-2007, 08:33 PM
tap tap tap