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jjinfla
04-02-2007, 05:35 AM
A lot of people recommended this book so I finally picked it up and read it.

Sure does explain a lot of things.

Makes sense about Mosconi's statement, at least I think it was Mosconi, when he was asked how to get good at pool you had to shoot a lot of balls. Or Ray Martin's training that "arm, brain, computer". Or when Jimmy Reid says listen to the sound the balls make at contact. Hear that sound and try and duplicate it when you shoot.

Watch a pro when he shoots rather than read all those inane aiming techniques.

Jake

cushioncrawler
04-02-2007, 03:47 PM
I read and re-read Precision Billiards, this woz written by R M Geyer in 1927 in India. He taught himself to become amateur english billiards champ of India. He woz a psychologist. All modern "brain" or "inner" books are merely copyz i reckon. madMac.

wolfdancer
04-02-2007, 04:10 PM
Mac,I think what Tim's book "introduced", was a new style of teaching sports....the traditional style was to keep pointing out what the student did wrong. Tim's approach was to give the conscious mind, which wants to be in control, something to focus on, while the sub-conscious learned by observation and imitation, much like a child does.
As we get older we want to know how many miliseconds the cue tip remains in contact with the CB, and whether we have reached peak acceleration, etc...instead of just stroking freely through the ball, and getting some sensory feedback.

cushioncrawler
04-02-2007, 04:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> Mac,I think what Tim's book "introduced", was a new style of teaching sports....the traditional style was to keep pointing out what the student did wrong. Tim's approach was to give the conscious mind, which wants to be in control, something to focus on, while the sub-conscious learned by observation and imitation, much like a child does. As we get older we want to know how many miliseconds the cue tip remains in contact with the CB, and whether we have reached peak acceleration, etc...instead of just stroking freely through the ball, and getting some sensory feedback. <hr /></blockquote>Woolfy -- It, and more, iz all in Geyer's book. madMac.

wolfdancer
04-02-2007, 04:36 PM
I couldn't find Geyer's book on Oprah's list....do you have a link for it? (can't still be in print....over here, but things move ever so slowly in Australia)

cushioncrawler
04-02-2007, 04:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> I couldn't find Geyer's book on Oprah's list....do you have a link for it? (can't still be in print....over here, but things move ever so slowly in Australia) <hr /></blockquote> I got my geyer from england by swapping for one of my rarer billiards books. Geyer might come up on EBay one day, but i am guessing that the bidding might reech US$1000 -- mainly from tennis players. madMac.