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View Full Version : Tight grip vs. Lose grip



TennesseeJoe
04-10-2007, 10:19 PM
Based on information posted on this site about the Jacksonville Experiment a question occurred to me: Does a tight grip have a different effect than a loose grip on the cue?

randyg
04-11-2007, 06:32 AM
YES, definitely....SPF=randyg

Rich R.
04-11-2007, 06:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> YES, definitely....SPF=randyg <hr /></blockquote>
Could you elaborate?

SpiderMan
04-11-2007, 07:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TennesseeJoe:</font><hr> Based on information posted on this site about the Jacksonville Experiment a question occurred to me: Does a tight grip have a different effect than a loose grip on the cue? <hr /></blockquote>

Not on the cue, it doesn't. But it has a big difference on how you play.

I think it's been both theorized and verified that the impulse force during the brief contact far overshadows anything you can do by accelerating/influencing the cue during contact. There was a long thread on this last week.

On the other hand, from a shooter's perspective, a loose grip encourages you to let the cue travel naturally in line without swoop or wobble, and keeps you from shoving it off-line with a poor stroke. Almost everything will work better with the loose grip, but it isn't because of anything that happens during contact. It's because it makes everything before contact work in better harmony. It helps your "real" stroke follow the exact path of your warm-up strokes rather than being a somewhat-independent event.

If you could keep the cue flowing perfectly in line with a tight grip, it would work just fine, but most people can't do that - they will unintentionally pull it off-line. A tight grip also seems to sometimes manifest itself in a really bad habit where you try to "take something off" your stroke just before contact, and the decelerating cue condition is very prone to missing your intended tip-contact point. People who "take something off" are much more likely to miscue when trying to play the edges of the cueball. Next time you miscue during a low soft draw, ask yourself whether you tried to pull your stroke just before contact. That is far less likely with a loose grip.

There are times when a tight grip is appropriate - for example, a nip draw to avoid a foul - but loose seems best for normal strokes.

For years I've had problems with tight grip and eye control (where I look during warm-up and delivery). I'm still working on both, and the more I work on it the better I shoot.

SpiderMan

ceebee
04-11-2007, 09:21 AM
Hey Spidey, quit working so hard on your fundamentals &amp; give some of us wannabees a chance to win.

I am going to cast my vote for the very comfortable &amp; very affective semi-loose grip. As I believe, JMHO, any tightness in the grip, causes some tension in the upper &amp; lower arm. These tensions can affect the stroke. That's my story &amp; I'm stickin' to it.

Good Luck with your stroke...

randyg
04-11-2007, 09:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> YES, definitely....SPF=randyg <hr /></blockquote>
Could you elaborate? <hr /></blockquote>

I just think SPIDERMAN said it best.

Remember this:
arm moves hand
hand holds cue
cue moves cueball
cueball moves objectball

The tension in one's grip is directly proportional to the movement of the cue.....SPF=randyg

dr_dave
04-11-2007, 11:01 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote TennesseeJoe:</font><hr> Based on information posted on this site about the Jacksonville Experiment a question occurred to me: Does a tight grip have a different effect than a loose grip on the cue? <hr /></blockquote>

Not on the cue, it doesn't. But it has a big difference on how you play.

I think it's been both theorized and verified that the impulse force during the brief contact far overshadows anything you can do by accelerating/influencing the cue during contact. There was a long thread on this last week.

On the other hand, from a shooter's perspective, a loose grip encourages you to let the cue travel naturally in line without swoop or wobble, and keeps you from shoving it off-line with a poor stroke. Almost everything will work better with the loose grip, but it isn't because of anything that happens during contact. It's because it makes everything before contact work in better harmony. It helps your "real" stroke follow the exact path of your warm-up strokes rather than being a somewhat-independent event.

If you could keep the cue flowing perfectly in line with a tight grip, it would work just fine, but most people can't do that - they will unintentionally pull it off-line. A tight grip also seems to sometimes manifest itself in a really bad habit where you try to "take something off" your stroke just before contact, and the decelerating cue condition is very prone to missing your intended tip-contact point. People who "take something off" are much more likely to miscue when trying to play the edges of the cueball. Next time you miscue during a low soft draw, ask yourself whether you tried to pull your stroke just before contact. That is far less likely with a loose grip.

There are times when a tight grip is appropriate - for example, a nip draw to avoid a foul - but loose seems best for normal strokes.

For years I've had problems with tight grip and eye control (where I look during warm-up and delivery). I'm still working on both, and the more I work on it the better I shoot.<hr /></blockquote>Excellent post!

You da man,
Dave

SpiderMan
04-11-2007, 12:58 PM
Hey Charlie,

Are you coming to Texas on the 21st?

SpiderMan