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View Full Version : WPA World 9-Ball Championship-collusion prominent?



jjinfla
04-17-2007, 10:47 AM
Just read Jerry Forsyth's article from January P&B and he just about comes out and says the players rigged it.

"Collusion among players to allow some through into the knockout stages was believed to be more prominent this year than at any other time in the past".

Those are Jerry's words, not mine, and he should know.

So that is what professional billiards comes down to? The men have to play great and then they still have to be part of the "in" crowd as to who gets the fix in his favor.

And people jumped all over Earl when he didn't call a foul on himself? But no one cares when pros dump in a major tournament?

Take up golf. Especially women. The LPGA, Ginn Open, paid $4,414 to last place and they were 14 over par.

And no one cheated.

Jake

Bob_Jewett
04-17-2007, 11:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jjinfla:</font><hr> ... "Collusion among players to allow some through into the knockout stages was believed to be more prominent this year than at any other time in the past". ... <hr /></blockquote>
The problem, of course, is the round-robin format. There are too many situations in which there is no harm to one player if he loses.

I was once in a similar situation in the collegiate tournaments where I could have lost a finals (against a friend) and still continued to the next level on average. Fortunately I didn't have to make the ethical decision because I didn't know that I was already qualified.

One year in Cardiff, there was some very surprising heavy betting against a top player in his final match in the round-robin when he had already qualified. And he lost the match. Or at least that was the story going around the arena. I think the on-site bookie (legal in the UK, and a major sponsor) was irritated.

HarryDC
04-18-2007, 08:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jjinfla:</font><hr> Just read Jerry Forsyth's article from January P&amp;B and he just about comes out and says the players rigged it.

"Collusion among players to allow some through into the knockout stages was believed to be more prominent this year than at any other time in the past".

Those are Jerry's words, not mine, and he should know.

So that is what professional billiards comes down to? The men have to play great and then they still have to be part of the "in" crowd as to who gets the fix in his favor.

And people jumped all over Earl when he didn't call a foul on himself? But no one cares when pros dump in a major tournament?

Take up golf. Especially women. The LPGA, Ginn Open, paid $4,414 to last place and they were 14 over par.

And no one cheated.

Jake <hr /></blockquote>

Jake

I am not shocked by the cheating. The WPA and Match Room Sports didn't ask one American to attend the Party Poker World Pool Masters. You would think John Schmidt a fine enough player for the tournament.

And you wonder why everyone makes sure they have all their door knobs when pool leaves town? Ha Ha Ha

HarryDC

jjinfla
04-18-2007, 12:20 PM
Well Harry I guess they know that Americans would not put up with cheating.

1st place in the Ginn Open paid $390,000.

Maybe the Americans should do what the WPA did and ban the foreigners from tournaments in America.

Must be a US Citizen to play.

Ha Ha No chance.

Jake

PS Wasn't that the WPA that wanted a big payoff when KT started the IPT? No wonder no one is surprised at the reported collusion.

HarryDC
04-19-2007, 03:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jjinfla:</font><hr> Well Harry I guess they know that Americans would not put up with cheating.

1st place in the Ginn Open paid $390,000.

Maybe the Americans should do what the WPA did and ban the foreigners from tournaments in America.

Must be a US Citizen to play.

Ha Ha No chance.

Jake

PS Wasn't that the WPA that wanted a big payoff when KT started the IPT? No wonder no one is surprised at the reported collusion. <hr /></blockquote>

Jake

The Americans would not put up with cheating? RIGHT!

I couldnít find the original press release from the WPA, but the attempted extortion of KT, was referred to as a player development fee. He He He It bombed because the European players are just as greedy as any other pool players in the world so they played anyway.

Remember KTíS remark ďthat only three players thanked himĒ and did you note that no one offered to help him when he needed some help. I took notice of the pool industryís lack of help and so did the large corporations.

As for the immigrant pool players itís easy. Remove their visas and donít let them in our country. Some of the immigrant players have been here so long they have green cards so they are paying members of our society.

HarryDC

scaramouche
04-20-2007, 06:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr>

One year in Cardiff, there was some very surprising heavy betting against a top player in his final match in the round-robin when he had already qualified. And he lost the match. Or at least that was the story going around the arena. I think the on-site bookie (legal in the UK, and a major sponsor) was irritated. <hr /></blockquote>

The bookie's first objective is to not lose money. The bookie's second objective is to have a round book, that is, bets so distributed that he makes the same money whoever wins.

To these ends, he adjusts his odds to attract money to entrants that would not be bet at lower odds, and to lower the odds on entrants attracting overwhelming money. I've seen a bookie offer the entire field against an overwhelming favourite in a horse race.

So a bookie should be a disinterested spectator, unless he is betting himself.

HarryDC
04-20-2007, 12:51 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote scaramouche:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr>

One year in Cardiff, there was some very surprising heavy betting against a top player in his final match in the round-robin when he had already qualified. And he lost the match. Or at least that was the story going around the arena. I think the on-site bookie (legal in the UK, and a major sponsor) was irritated. <hr /></blockquote>


The bookie's first objective is to not lose money. The bookie's second objective is to have a round book, that is, bets so distributed that he makes the same money whoever wins.

To these ends, he adjusts his odds to attract money to entrants that would not be bet at lower odds, and to lower the odds on entrants attracting overwhelming money. I've seen a bookie offer the entire field against an overwhelming favourite in a horse race.

So a bookie should be a disinterested spectator, unless he is betting himself. <hr /></blockquote>

scaramouche

You left out the scenario of the bookie being an interested party, with or without betting himself, who bribes one or more of the players, to alter the outcome of the event.

The scenario is more prevalent in pool than any other game. In pool it is almost undetectable.

HarryDC

jjinfla
04-20-2007, 05:02 PM
Harry,

Are you saying that pool players would conspire against the person who has money? Just so that they could transfer that money to their own pocket?

Say it ain't so Harry.

Here all this time I thought pool and the players were on the up and up. Gee, if what you say is true that just might explain why there is no money in pool.

Fool me once ....

Jake

HarryDC
04-21-2007, 07:05 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jjinfla:</font><hr> Harry,

Are you saying that pool players would conspire against the person who has money? Just so that they could transfer that money to their own pocket?

Say it ain't so Harry.

Here all this time I thought pool and the players were on the up and up. Gee, if what you say is true that just might explain why there is no money in pool.

Fool me once ....

Jake <hr /></blockquote>

Jake,

You didnít have a delusion about pool people being alter boys and girls did you?

Fool you never! ha ha ha

Pro pool is like the shell game, the only time the pea doesnít get palmed is when the operator is looking for suckers.

HarryDC