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View Full Version : Needed: Reccomendations for House Cues



breakpoint
04-23-2007, 12:34 PM
Hello all!

I am looking to buy new house cues for my poolhall and wanted some feedback on whether to switch from screw in tips to glued on tips? Also if anyone has any suggestions as to screw in tip cues to use would be more than helpful.

Thanks!
-
Claire

ras314
04-23-2007, 12:45 PM
A poolhall with screw in tip house cues? Maybe if the tables had wood "slates" /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

Actually it is probably cheaper to replace glue on tips once you are set up to do it.

underdog
04-23-2007, 01:33 PM
I personally would not play in a poolhall that used screw on tips on house cues.
Just my opinion.

Bob_Jewett
04-23-2007, 05:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote breakpoint:</font><hr> ... I am looking to buy new house cues for my poolhall and wanted some feedback on whether to switch from screw in tips to glued on tips? Also if anyone has any suggestions as to screw in tip cues to use would be more than helpful.... <hr /></blockquote>
I think there is no physical reason why screw-on tips couldn't work well, but I've never seen one that did. To the best of my knowledge, there is not now nor has there ever been a professional player who willing used a screw-on tip.

It depends on whether you feel it is important to offer your customers good equipment. I assume that you find screw-on tips to be less expensive because there is almost no cost of installation.

DeadCrab
04-23-2007, 06:29 PM
I carry my own cue, but look for a house cue to break with. Usually, it is not possible to find one with a tip that isn't destroyed. A screw on is a lot better than many house tips, and if you think they are better than what you will have with glue-ons, then by all means use them.

Hardly anyone buys graphite or fiberglass cues with screw-ons for their own cue, but their durability and warp resistance may make them a reasonable choice for a house stick. You can always get some low-end sneaky petes to rent for a nominal charge(like $1/hour) for those who want a house cue with a little feel.

breakpoint
04-23-2007, 09:09 PM
We currently have glue on tips but the re-glue process isn't top notch. I'm finding that I have to replace a lot of tips and since neither my staff nor i feel completely confident in the re-attachment process I was hoping that screw-in tips would be a better alternative.

Also my poolhall is on a school campus. We have a lot of students who are not serious players who tend to rack up the damage to our current cues... So I'm just trying to find a best alternative to satisfy students but have something that can withstand wear and tear

Bob_Jewett
04-23-2007, 10:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote breakpoint:</font><hr> We currently have glue on tips but the re-glue process isn't top notch. I'm finding that I have to replace a lot of tips and since neither my staff nor i feel completely confident in the re-attachment process I was hoping that screw-in tips would be a better alternative.... on a school campus ... <hr /></blockquote>
I'll try to summarize retipping recommendations.

Get a good quality tip like Triangle or Le Pro. The tip needs to be slightly larger than the ferrule of the cue. Clean off the old tip and the glue from the ferrule. There are little machines that do this but you can also do it with sandpaper if you're careful. Don't round the end of the stick. Sand the back of the tip with about #120 sandpaper so the glue will take. There are epoxies that will work but most cue repairmen seem to use super-glue gel. The gel has the advantage over regular super-glue of a little more working time and it can fill voids some. Apply glue to both surfaces and hold tightly in place for a minute or so. A good arrangement is to jam the cue gently under an overhang of the right height to keep the tip pressed against the ferrule. There are also retipping tools that will keep pressure on the tip, but they tend to dent the wood of the shaft. A rubber band can also be used for this.

After the glue has set, carefully trim the tip so that it is not hanging over the edge of the ferrule. This requires careful work with a very sharp knife or razor blade, or the use of a special tip trimming tool. You can do some of the tip trimming with sand paper, but you have to be very careful not to sand the side of the ferrule. In the end, you want the tip to be a smooth extension of the cylindrical shape of the ferrule. Finally, shape the top of the tip so it is curved like the edge of a penny.

If you are paying an outside person or billiard supply place to retip your cues, they should be willing to reglue popped-off tips at no charge. It was not clear from your note above who was doing the work. If you are doing your own work now, and such a service is available, you might consider having them retip a batch of cues and see how it works out. At least you should be able to see how the result should look (assuming they know what they're doing).

I used to be in charge of the retipping for a rec room. When I arrived, most or all of the cues had no tips and people were playing right on the wood. I learned by doing. Experiment. Find out what works.

Stretch
04-24-2007, 10:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote breakpoint:</font><hr> Hello all!

I am looking to buy new house cues for my poolhall and wanted some feedback on whether to switch from screw in tips to glued on tips? Also if anyone has any suggestions as to screw in tip cues to use would be more than helpful.

Thanks!
-
Claire <hr /></blockquote>

Hi Claire, as you can tell the meer mention of the word screwontip touches a nerve with pool players lol. Most of the Cue company;s make the low end one peice cues with the glue on tips. For Bulk orders you can get a great deal on them, just shop around. If you are not into tip repair you'll need to know someone who is and have them keep your cues with good tips on. Your patrons will love you for it. St.

breakpoint
04-24-2007, 10:42 AM
thank you for this very detailed help. I really appreciate it, I am not sure that my prescribed budget will allow for someone from the outside to do this (also there are university rules) currently my student assistants are responsible for replacing broken cues (which also are the source for tips that pop off) that's why I was thinking more of a screw on tip, since my student assistants are inconsistent in their tip applying

Thanks!
-
Claire

breakpoint
04-24-2007, 10:45 AM
The reason I am looking into this is because we are a school facility, with the few that are really dedicated to pool brining in their own cues. Mostly we have just students just to come in and play around (which is great, and why we are here) I am just trying to figure out if there's a better way than what we or if what we have is best. We currently fix all our cues, but we tend to have to repair cues on a daily basis (My staff, including myself are all students with a limited knowledge about cue repair)

Soo what to do I am not sure yet but there's a large majority on here saying to stick with what we have.

ras314
04-24-2007, 11:11 AM
Tips like Triangle and Le Pro should run around 50 cents or less bought in quantity. Super Glue Gel is relatively cheap if you can do a batch of cues at the time. it doesn't last long after being opened.

Personally I rate the slip over tips you find in bars right down there with screw in tips, although they are easy to replace. I re-tipped bar cues using super glue gel for a while, though few bangers seemed to noticed the difference. Might take me a several hours to work over a dozen cues, but I spent some time with each cue shaping the tip and hitting with them for a bit to make sure the tip would stay on.

I did decide that many of the bar tips, and ferrules, were getting damaged by people slamming the butts on the floor. It seemed to help if the rubber bumpers on the butt were kept on.

There are some one piece artificial cues showing up in bars that are tan colored and actually play better than a lot of the wood cues. All I've seen use glue on tips with something close to a "pro" taper and don't seem to break or warp either.

SPetty
04-25-2007, 10:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr>I did decide that many of the bar tips, and ferrules, were getting damaged by people slamming the butts on the floor. It seemed to help if the rubber bumpers on the butt were kept on.

There are some one piece artificial cues showing up in bars that are tan colored and actually play better than a lot of the wood cues.<hr /></blockquote>Maybe I'm having a bad day today, but I can't seem to figure out how a tip or ferrule can get damaged by slamming the butt on the floor... And what do you mean by "artificial" cue?

ras314
04-25-2007, 01:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> Maybe I'm having a bad day today, but I can't seem to figure out how a tip or ferrule can get damaged by slamming the butt on the floor... And what do you mean by "artificial" cue? <hr /></blockquote>
"Artifical" cue means I was too lazy to type fiberglass, graphite, aluminum, titainum, or made from any other non natural growing plant material. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

By slamming a bare butt on a hard floor it drives the ferrule and tip down on the wood. Sort of like setting the head of a hammer or axe on the handle by wacking the end of the handle down on something hard. While the tip and ferrule are not as heavy, I think the effect is still there. I have seen some ferrules actually split by doing this on a concerte floor. These ferrules had a tapered hole with the cue's tenon having a mating conical shape and could be installed by hand. I suspect slaming a cue on the floor would be hard on joints also.

Saw a jerk miss the floor and hit the top of his foot once. Wore a cast for a while. He was careful to hit the floor after that, kinda funny to watch. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

Place I'm heading for tonight has two different versions of fiberglass house cues, the kind where you can see the fiberglass cloth weave thru the colored resin. I don't expect to see many people using them, they are stiffer than my break cue. And this place is a up scale sports bar compared to the questionable joints I usually wind up in.

Next time I run across the good ones I'll try to find where they are avaliable from, they may be of interest to the op and I'd like to have a couple for visitors.

Roy

Deeman3
04-25-2007, 02:17 PM
ras,

I believe the ferrule split from vibration rather than the weight of the tip/ferrule combination. I just don't think there is enough mass in those two items to cause the shock to split it or even separate the tip and ferrule. However, you have heard what the technical experts think of my physics knowledge... /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

ras314
04-26-2007, 02:28 PM
Deeman'

You could be right, of course. Those cues had hit the concrete so many times they were split up and mushruomed out like a wooden tent stake at the circus. Hopefully the clients at a rec room are not as bad.

Don't know about physics, but school obiously didn't teach me much about spelling.... /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Roy

Jal
04-26-2007, 02:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote breakpoint:</font><hr>...We currently fix all our cues, but we tend to have to repair cues on a daily basis (My staff, including myself are all students with a limited knowledge about cue repair)

Soo what to do I am not sure yet but there's a large majority on here saying to stick with what we have. <hr /></blockquote>Trimming and shaping the tip would go much faster if you could get an electric drill to turn the cue as on a lathe. You could also burnish the shafts with a piece of leather or paper if you like too. Maybe some of the tip tools do just as good a job.

Jim

mr_griff
04-30-2007, 03:27 PM
dont go with screw on tips, I would never play with one. Pay the $15 dollars for a tip clamp and the $15 dollars for a tip trimming tool. If you have the right tools just laminate the instructions, theres no expertise a 5 mintue lesson cant solve. Get some triangle or Le Pro tips. If the tips are put on right you wont have to monkey with them on a daily basis.

Drop a few bucks on a shaft slicker. Tiger makes a good one, that is basically a pad and light grit sand paper. Clean the shafts up and you should be in business.

Snapshot9
04-30-2007, 04:33 PM
For less than $50, you can get everything you need to maintain or replace tips.

For house cues, Pooldawg has from $8 to about $33 a stick, including Valley Supremes, Dufferin, etc..
go to: Pooldawg's one piece house cues (http://www.pooldawg.com/category/one-piece-pool-cues)

and they have free shipping over $50.