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tjlmbklr
04-26-2007, 09:43 AM
When you watch some matches on TV like the Mosconi cup for instance they have a white marker for the placement of the rack and the headstring. What do they use for this?

I finally purchased a Kim Steel rack (still awaiting delivery) and want to start getting the best rack possible. However the black spot being used is not adhering the best it should, and I don't think a different brand will help, I believe it is enviromental. This is leaving little microscopic high/low spots and causing the front ball to always roll the little bit leaving what I and many others would call a "loose rack" Therefore I want eliminate it all together and have the white marker as my rack placement point.

Anyone else do this? I do have Simonis camel colored cloth, so I could always use black perminate marker too.


Thanks

TJ

Derek
04-27-2007, 08:15 AM
Don't use the permanent marker, as it bleeds into the cloth and you won't get a nice little uniform circle. I did this on my Simonis and watched it bleed into a melanoma-type mole. Fortunately, I was able to cover it up with an actual sticker spot.

I think the big spots are gaudy, IMO, but I do like having a spot so the balls can be racked consistently. I purchased some small 1/4" black spots from Mueller for cheap and it was like 50 spots (more than I'll use in my lifetime).

DeadCrab
04-27-2007, 08:35 AM
I would neither mark or sticker my cloth.

If you want it perfect, I would find a stable point in the room or overhead light and firmly attach a bright LED or laser pointer so that it shines on the correct spot on the head ball. Turn it off when not racking, and watch the reflections if using a laser.

JimS
04-28-2007, 06:53 AM
I don't use a spot. My Simonis is marked w/a Sharpie. No bleeding ever. In fact the head and center spots are also marked and I have a line drawn on the under side of the foot cushion, in the center, for practice drills. No bleeding. Different marker type?

Derek
04-28-2007, 10:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr> I don't use a spot. My Simonis is marked w/a Sharpie. No bleeding ever. In fact the head and center spots are also marked and I have a line drawn on the under side of the foot cushion, in the center, for practice drills. No bleeding. Different marker type? <hr /></blockquote>

Interesting. Mine bled, so that's what prevented me from doing it again. Maybe I didn't use a Sharpie and some cheapo brand instead. If I remember right, it was probably a fat tip versus the thin tip Sharpies you can buy now.

slipstroke
04-28-2007, 11:34 AM
Interesting subject. I have heard if you don't use a spot and play games, such as 8 ball or 9 ball, where you are breaking the balls using the head ball you could create a hole in the cloth under the head ball. True or False?

tjlmbklr
04-30-2007, 03:39 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote slipstroke:</font><hr> Interesting subject. I have heard if you don't use a spot and play games, such as 8 ball or 9 ball, where you are breaking the balls using the head ball you could create a hole in the cloth under the head ball. True or False? <hr /></blockquote>


TRUE TRUE TRUE;


I just found this out after 5 or so racks the front ball would move on it's own. The force of hitting that front ball all the time was indeed putting a divet in the clothe. I took BigRigTom's advise from HERE (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showflat.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=250230&amp;page=0&amp;v iew=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;fpart=1) and bought some good double gummed spots.

Paul_Mon
05-01-2007, 05:28 AM
I marked my table with a 2H lead pencil and use Masters spots, never had one lift up. I outline the rack, put down a head string line and a long string line from the foot spot to foot rail. Additionally, I have a mark in the exact center of the back leg of the rack marking where it intersects the long string. My rack has been notched in the center of each leg. I stole this from the Diamond rack.

These pencil markings take a long time to wear off so make sure to get it right.

Paul Mon