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View Full Version : Help in Buying A Pool Table



DeVante
05-24-2007, 12:44 PM
I am pleading for some expert advice from all you guys and gals. I am planning on purchasing a pool table for my basement. I can fit a 9', but will probably end up buying an 8'. Locally, an Olhausen distributor has quoted me $2900 for an 8' Olhausen Monarch table. He is throwing in leather pockets for free. Also, the shipping and setup are free, since he is so close to my home. Is this a good price for a table of this brand? He quoted me $3300 on the 9' with the same things thrown in. If this is out of line, can someone give me some ideas of a less expensive, but good quality brand I can look at. The thing that seems to set Olhausen apart is that they have a warranty on the cushions too. Do cushions wear out that easily and need to be replaced during the life of the table? Thanks for all and any help that can be given.

Bob_Jewett
05-24-2007, 03:29 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeVante:</font><hr> ... Do cushions wear out that easily and need to be replaced during the life of the table? ... <hr /></blockquote>
Cushions go dead. I've seen cushion sections as hard as pottery. Really. This can happen in less than five years.

They can also come loose. I've heard of one local retailer who removes and re-glues all the cushions on one brand of table they sell so they don't have to make return calls.

DeVante
05-24-2007, 04:21 PM
Thanks Bob. So in your opinion, an Olhausen with cushion replacement in the warranty would make it worth it? Do you know how much it would cost to replace cushions?

Bob_Jewett
05-24-2007, 05:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeVante:</font><hr> Thanks Bob. So in your opinion, an Olhausen with cushion replacement in the warranty would make it worth it? Do you know how much it would cost to replace cushions? <hr /></blockquote>The cushion material costs between $20/set and $150/set depending on type and whether retail or wholesale. Then there is the labor of installing them. I'd guess a couple or three hundred dollars for cushion replacement but I've never paid for one.

My experience is that Olhausen in a solid table, but I probably haven't played on the specific model you're considering.

bradb
05-24-2007, 05:11 PM
The cushions on a quality table like the one you are buying will last a lifetime of use in home play. It's the tables in poolhalls that get banged from constant play and abuse that need resurfacing all the time.

Get Simonis cloth (860) and 1" slate. Get real wood on your rails, but real wood underneath is not needed, the plyed laminate wood underneath is just as strong if not stronger for the frame and will save you money.

Make sure your dealer has an experienced installer so that the table is level and the cloth is stretched evenly.

If the cushion replacement warranty is expensive I don't think you will need it. But if its part of it why not.

PS... stay away from the chinese built tables, they look great but they are poor quality. make sure the one you are buying has the Olhausen name on it. And is made by them here.

BigRigTom
05-24-2007, 05:20 PM
All the advise you get is geographically specific. If you want meaningful response you need to indicate where you are. The price and service in Chicago is not anything near the price and service in LA or New York, or Canada or Jamaica and Austrailia for that matter.

I have a 33 year old Brunswick and it has the ORIGINAL RAILS STILL. Plays great too.
Sounds like rail replacement is not likely if it is made right in the 1st place.
Just the fact the dealer feels the need to mention them would make me suspicious.
Good luck to you and...... Olhausen IS a GREAT table from my experience so you just have to be careful of the dealer and installer.

DeVante
05-24-2007, 05:22 PM
Brad, thanks for the reply. The part that you said about the laminate wood underneath puts my mind at ease. To cut down on the cost, the dealer told me the exact same thing. I wasn't sure if he was feeding me some bs, or being truthful. Hearing that from someone who knows about tables, makes me realize he was being honest. I am definitely going all American, no chinese table or parts here. It just comes down to the price being realistic for the table I am buying. The only bad thing about Olhausen is that you can't buy a table out of your area if you have an Olhausen distributor locally. I tried to do that and when a dealer out of state checked that I had one locally, they wouldn't give me a price. I know they do it to keep from getting in a price war, but I am frustrated because I don't know if it is a good price or not.

bradb
05-24-2007, 05:32 PM
Check out the internet on your particular table there will be a good range of prices there. Most top name dealers are competitive. Don't hesitate to see what else you can get thrown in, You should also get 4 cues, balls (ask if he will include Aramis premium), a rest, table cover and a decent triangle. Good luck.

DeVante
05-24-2007, 06:33 PM
Thanks Tom. I am in Toledo, Ohio. Hope that helps on the price I mentioned.

bsmutz
05-25-2007, 10:44 AM
Buying a table is a bit of a crap shoot. You've undoubtedly chosen a good quality table. That is the first important step. As long as the construction quality is there, tables should last several lifetimes if taken care of. It is usually quite a bit cheaper to find a used table in good condition as you can usually get all the paraphenalia with it that you will end up buying anyway. With the money you save, you could upgrade the cushions and cloth if needed.
The second most important part of buying a table is getting it installed correctly. It seems that most table installers are in a hurry and don't take the time to seal the seams the right way and make sure that the playing surface is completely level over its entire area. Unfortunately, it's rather difficult to tell the difference between a good installer and a bad one until it is too late (unless you don't have any compunctions about telling someone they aren't doing a job to your standards, you want them to leave now, and no, they are not getting paid). No amount of reiterating how you want a perfect installation is going to make someone who doesn't really care change how they work. The best gamble is to find someone who says that they will fix anything not to your liking for free. Of course, you are then depending on them keeping their word. Hopefully you will have a good experience. I've had two different installers set up tables for me and got unacceptable results from both. In the future, I would ask them up front if they use a machinist's level to set the table up with. If they say no and start talking about rolling balls, I'd go find someone else. You just can't judge the whole table by rolling a few balls around. Ideally, I'd try to find someone local that had a great installation experience.

DeVante
05-25-2007, 10:52 AM
Thanks, I will ask the installer about the levelling of the tables.

jacklenenberg
05-26-2007, 01:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DeVante:</font><hr> Brad, thanks for the reply. The part that you said about the laminate wood underneath puts my mind at ease. To cut down on the cost, the dealer told me the exact same thing. I wasn't sure if he was feeding me some bs, or being truthful. Hearing that from someone who knows about tables, makes me realize he was being honest. I am definitely going all American, no chinese table or parts here. It just comes down to the price being realistic for the table I am buying. The only bad thing about Olhausen is that you can't buy a table out of your area if you have an Olhausen distributor locally. I tried to do that and when a dealer out of state checked that I had one locally, they wouldn't give me a price. I know they do it to keep from getting in a price war, but I am frustrated because I don't know if it is a good price or not. <hr /></blockquote>

I got a quote from a non-local dealer.

wolfdancer
05-26-2007, 05:28 PM
Bill, I just thought that you had the tables tricked up on purpose...so's you could beat me....
Hey, they played ok, but your installer was more impressed with himself, and his "expertise" than I was.....but I've seen the two best mechanics in action...Ernesto Dominguez, and Bob Bebb, and worked for Bob, doing several rooms (I had the hi-tech job of pulling staples)
By the way the Starrett machinists level seems to be the best...it's then a question of individual preferences as to the size.
Another good idea that I saw used by another mechanic was a "chute" with guides where the ball could be placed on top and just rolled down.....a plastic pipe cut lengthwise, could accomplish the same thing.....