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KellyStick
06-12-2007, 08:46 PM
Can anyone give me some tips on breaking. I can break relatively hard and with decent aim but my CB control is very poor. TO be honest I am not even sure where to hit the cb to get a good break that stops the cb. Seems you would want to hit center ball and basically slide the cb into the rack w/o rolling so when it hits, if square it would just die in the middle of the table. I can't seem to make that work AND I have never really read anything that describes how you should break. Anyone have any tips? Stroke control tips might be good since I seem to lose control at times getting follow or draw possibly right or left but might not recogize that. This is probably relatively simple and I suspect I just have some bad habits.

underdog
06-12-2007, 09:11 PM
My best advice is to get an instructor or at least a very good player to watch you break. I usually hit just a little below center and kind of lean my whole body into it. Kind of like the phillipinos do but not so flamboyant.

Koenig
06-12-2007, 09:18 PM
well, you have to aim so that you get control. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif What I mean is, if you break with the follow-through going slightly down, (back arm up) you will have to aim a tad above center. But donīt forget to lift that arm then. If you go through straight, aim dead center. If your body goes up, your back hand will have to go down. Knuckles almost hitting wood.

If you want to use your body in a forward, and/or upward motion - be sure to lead with it. At least together with the arm, but rather slightly before the blast.

Timing I think itīs called. Try it 2000 times.

Jal
06-12-2007, 11:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr>...TO be honest I am not even sure where to hit the cb to get a good break that stops the cb. Seems you would want to hit center ball and basically slide the cb into the rack w/o rolling so when it hits, if square it would just die in the middle of the table. I can't seem to make that work AND I have never really read anything that describes how you should break. Anyone have any tips? ...<hr /></blockquote>You want the cueball to have some topspin when it meets the rack. This will act like a brake and stop it from rebounding back too far.

It doesn't necessarily mean hitting above center. The cueball will tend to pick up some topspin after it leaves your tip, even if it sails all the way to the rack. It gets it from the first bounce off the bed just after tip/ball impact, and of course, any subsequent bounces. (In fact, to my understanding, if it is airborn all the way, it should pick up more topspin from the one bounce than if it slid along the surface the entire way.)

Exactly where to strike to get the right amount of topspin depends on ball speed, cue elevation and cloth/ball conditions. But, it's going to be near centerball.

The adjustment, in theory, is very simple. If the cueball is following too far forward, hit lower; if it's rebounding back too far, hit higher. If it's badly inconsistent, shorten your bridge length and/or slow down some until you get better control.

Jim

Cornerman
06-13-2007, 07:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> Can anyone give me some tips on breaking. I can break relatively hard and with decent aim but my CB control is very poor. TO be honest I am not even sure where to hit the cb to get a good break that stops the cb. Seems you would want to hit center ball and basically slide the cb into the rack w/o rolling so when it hits, if square it would just die in the middle of the table. I can't seem to make that work AND I have never really read anything that describes how you should break. Anyone have any tips? Stroke control tips might be good since I seem to lose control at times getting follow or draw possibly right or left but might not recogize that. This is probably relatively simple and I suspect I just have some bad habits. <hr /></blockquote>Which way does your ball normally go after you strike the rack?

From a baseball or golf approach to these type of problems, I normally suggest that if your ball is flying forward, then aim slightly lower. Same deal if your ball is drawing back. The human body is an amazing machine that will repeat its natural motion, so just adjust your initial aim, even if that's really not where you end up hitting it. If you watch top players, they aim at impossible places.

If you're going left or right, you're either not aiming at the center or you're aiming at the center, but not hitting at the center. For the former, someone else will need to watch you and tell you where you're aiming. For the latter, I find that telling my players to concentrate on a follow through to a point on the table (Point A on the CUETABLE.COM table below. I find that many player are a bit loose on where their cuestick is going.

http://CueTable.com/P/?@3AALW4BCYB3CCpA4DCYe4EFCe3FCxe4GBKP3HAMB3IAUe3JF bd4KDnP3LBjP3MEMO4NBJl3OBal1POPV1QJwJ@

Aside from this quick athletic coaching style of suggestion, working one-on-one with a qualified breaking instructor works wonders since your mechanics can't be seen online.

Fred

dr_dave
06-13-2007, 08:53 AM
FYI, there are links to lots of break advice and resources under "break" here (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/threads.html).

Regards,
Dave
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> Can anyone give me some tips on breaking. I can break relatively hard and with decent aim but my CB control is very poor. TO be honest I am not even sure where to hit the cb to get a good break that stops the cb. Seems you would want to hit center ball and basically slide the cb into the rack w/o rolling so when it hits, if square it would just die in the middle of the table. I can't seem to make that work AND I have never really read anything that describes how you should break. Anyone have any tips? Stroke control tips might be good since I seem to lose control at times getting follow or draw possibly right or left but might not recogize that. This is probably relatively simple and I suspect I just have some bad habits. <hr /></blockquote>

TennesseeJoe
06-13-2007, 10:01 AM
If you're going left or right, you're either not aiming at the center or you're aiming at the center, but not hitting at the center.

Fred,
Is your statement correct if the One ball is not touching either one of the two balls behind the One ball? I have found that by racking 3 balls and leaving the One ball touching only one of the other balls, there is a different reaction by the Cue ball. (My study has not been very scientific.)

Cornerman
06-13-2007, 10:18 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TennesseeJoe:</font><hr> If you're going left or right, you're either not aiming at the center or you're aiming at the center, but not hitting at the center.

Fred,
Is your statement correct if the One ball is not touching either one of the two balls behind the One ball? I have found that by racking 3 balls and leaving the One ball touching only one of the other balls, there is a different reaction by the Cue ball. (My study has not been very scientific.)
<hr /></blockquote>Actually, I think this would be a good study. I'm sure a quick physics calculation will would tell us the magnitude of the lateral force would be be seen if one of the balls wasn't touching the pack.

Fred

bsmutz
06-13-2007, 10:52 AM
Slow down your break speed, concentrating on hitting the head ball full and controlling the cue ball. As you get better at these two things, start adding additional speed.

BigRigTom
06-13-2007, 11:04 AM
I recently read and article about developing a good consistent "Power Break" and I tried to find it with out success so I will paraphrase best I can and maybe someone will recognize the description and chime in with the actual source of the article itself.....it goes something like this.

Put an object ball on the foot spot, the cue ball on the head spot. Line up on the shot and hit the object ball head on and straignt into the foot rail stopping the cue ball on the foot spot while trying to cause the object ball to rebound straight off the foot rail back into the frozen cue ball. You want to then watch where the cue ball goes when the object ball bounces back into it. Adjust what ever you think needs it and shoot the same shot over and over.....This is great break practice with out the druggery of racking over and over.....and with out spending a bundle on gimmicks.


You may need to start out slow to medium speed then as your accuracy increases you should increase the speed and force with which you are shooting.
Once you get where you can hit the ball with "Power Break" speed while causing all that force to be transferred to the object ball, the rail and back into the cue ball and at the same time make the object ball send the cue ball back to your cue tip....you have developed the consistent stroke and power delivery your need for a pretty damn good break shot.

Feed back is instant and you can immediately see the problems if you are not stroking straight, not stoping the cue ball on the spot, not hitting the object ball squarely or what ever.
It works for me! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Koenig
06-13-2007, 03:00 PM
This may sound strange - and it is. But I often get better control when gripping far back, using a long bridge and breaking at a moderate speed. Working at precise hit on cue/object- ball.

Rather than shortening, that is.

Cornerman
06-13-2007, 04:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Koenig:</font><hr> This may sound strange - and it is. But I often get better control when gripping far back, using a long bridge and breaking at a moderate speed. Working at precise hit on cue/object- ball.

Rather than shortening, that is.

<hr /></blockquote>I think this is important to discuss. Everyone's body is different. I notice that players that are stronger in the arm can break big with a short bridge. Others get great control with a super long bridge. Anyone who discourages the long bridge needs to step back and really really really make sure they understand the mechanic and why some players can indeed get better control with a longer bridge.

The longer bridge allows you to get to a higher speed while maintaining a lower acceleration. THat is, you might be under more control with a longer bridge in getting the final desired stick speed. THe shorter bridge, you'll need to have a higher acceleration for the same final stick speed. And that will need more arm strength to keep under control.

Fred &lt;~~~ everybody's body is different

Koenig
06-13-2007, 04:54 PM
yeah, what he said!

This is not to say I dont like to shorten a little when blasting away. But control for me is longer, slower. And maybe lift the back hand a bit letting the cb jump some inches.

ceebee
06-13-2007, 05:00 PM
The "long bridge" allows the player to accelerate to a higher stroking speed, just because of the distance &amp; time allowance. The longer bridge allows for a smooth rhythm vs the short bridge &amp; the "lunging effect". JMHO

Hardly anything beats a square hit on a solid rack.

Good Luck to all...

TennesseeJoe
06-17-2007, 09:09 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cornerman:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote TennesseeJoe:</font><hr> If you're going left or right, you're either not aiming at the center or you're aiming at the center, but not hitting at the center.

Fred,
Is your statement correct if the One ball is not touching either one of the two balls behind the One ball? I have found that by racking 3 balls and leaving the One ball touching only one of the other balls, there is a different reaction by the Cue ball. (My study has not been very scientific.)
<hr /></blockquote>Actually, I think this would be a good study. I'm sure a quick physics calculation will would tell us the magnitude of the lateral force would be be seen if one of the balls wasn't touching the pack.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

Fred, I'm very interested in the results of your calculation. Some of us old timers who played by instinct do not have the benefits of your scientific background but still have a keen interest in learning. That translates to I'm interested, but keep it simple. Thanks,
Tennessee Joe

BigRigTom
06-19-2007, 04:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr> I recently read and article about developing a good consistent "Power Break" and I tried to find it with out success so I will paraphrase best I can and maybe someone will recognize the description and chime in with the actual source of the article itself.....it goes something like this.

Put an object ball on the foot spot, the cue ball on the head spot. Line up on the shot and hit the object ball head on and straignt into the foot rail stopping the cue ball on the foot spot while trying to cause the object ball to rebound straight off the foot rail back into the frozen cue ball. You want to then watch where the cue ball goes when the object ball bounces back into it. Adjust what ever you think needs it and shoot the same shot over and over.....This is great break practice with out the druggery of racking over and over.....and with out spending a bundle on gimmicks.


You may need to start out slow to medium speed then as your accuracy increases you should increase the speed and force with which you are shooting.
Once you get where you can hit the ball with "Power Break" speed while causing all that force to be transferred to the object ball, the rail and back into the cue ball and at the same time make the object ball send the cue ball back to your cue tip....you have developed the consistent stroke and power delivery your need for a pretty damn good break shot.

Feed back is instant and you can immediately see the problems if you are not stroking straight, not stoping the cue ball on the spot, not hitting the object ball squarely or what ever.
It works for me! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif <hr /></blockquote>

I finally found the article myself!
It is by Tom Ross in the April Issue of Billiards Digest...titled " Break it Down "

bradb
06-19-2007, 04:18 PM
I've been working with all kinds of breaks including a power break, but i've found more power means nothing if you are not making good contact. I've gone to a way that has better results.

I'm using Johnny Archers break as its a good way of keeping the Qball under control. Its from the left side (as most are these days) but he does'nt use much power. He hits the Qball dead center and contacts the 1 ball about 1/2 tip to the right so it sits right there. This results in a wing ball in and a nice spread. The key is you must excecute with straight thru stroke and contact right at the point. It takes a lot of practice, but if you master it you will have consistant results. Keeping the power down will help you to keep your arm under control.- Brad