PDA

View Full Version : The importance of safety play



bradb
06-19-2007, 05:16 PM
I've been playing well lately... been practising and getting a lot of play in. My game has got to the point where I'm running out consistently when given an open shot and a good spread.

I was getting pretty cocky so I took on the local pro for a set of 8 ball. I figured with my game improvement I should win at least a few games and give him some competition. God was I wrong!... I never got a shot... all I saw was hooks and safetys.

When I hooked him, he got out easily and always managed to keep it safe! If I tried a hook and missed it, he ran out. By the end of the set I was so off my game I was wondering if I could play at all even if I got a shot.

The pro had made it painfully obvious that I was not a complete player. I had not been practicing safety play because I did'nt need too with the level i was playing at.. Working on that now for sure.

There are a lot of videos, books, etc. on making the ball, but very little on good safety play. It requires knowledge of the rails and the diamonds, but most import it's touch! Getting the Qball to nestle up on a freeze takes hours of practice. Also you must know exactly how far the Qball will roll in relation to the object ball. Its boring practice, but if anyone is moving into the upper leagues its execute it, or go home. -Brad

Dagwood
06-19-2007, 06:36 PM
Don't forget that when you are playing someone at that level, you have to not only put him into safeties, but get out of his safeties with a high degree of success as well without selling out. that is the other side of safety play which many pool players who are trying to improve fail to work on. You should be working on this as much as your actual safety play.

Dags

pooltchr
06-19-2007, 06:46 PM
Find someone who plays at about your level. Play 9-ball with the understanding that the only winner is the one who can 3-foul the other player. Your ability to play safe, and to get out of jail will improve with time.
Steve

bradb
06-19-2007, 07:00 PM
Yes thats important. As I mentioned when i was successful in hooking him he escaped everytime, but when the tables were turned I did'nt have his success. He was able to not only kick the OB, but hit it in the direction he intended.

In practising this shot it is very difficult to stay away from side spin, as that screws everything up. It requires precise queing. I think the best way to practise it is to try an even distance kick then varying the distance to get a feel for the rebound.

Would be interested in other vartiations, as I'm still struggling with it. I use the diamonds in bank shots, but they don't seem to help here. There's nothing more frustrating then missing the kick altogether.

ceebee
06-20-2007, 11:32 AM
I would advise you to learn some parts of the "Diamond System", the "Sids" System, the "Two Plus System" & others. Dr. Cue has a great video on learning to kick at hidden object balls, with one, two & 3 or more rails.

One very important thing to remember, about kicking to hit the object ball, is the speed to use for cue ball & object ball control, after the hit.

Good Luck...

Dagwood
06-20-2007, 05:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bradb:</font><hr> As I mentioned when i was successful in hooking him he escaped everytime, but when the tables were turned I did'nt have his success. He was able to not only kick the OB, but hit it in the direction he intended.
<hr /></blockquote>

Many times just "hooking" your opponent is not nearly good enough. You have to put them in a position where they have to kick more than one rail, and preferably lenthwise on the table. Also of high importance is to get him snuggled on another ball, taking away avenues to kick at his object balls. As you get better at these thigns, you'll also start to notice where the traffic on the table is and be able to force your opponent to kick in that direction by where you put your cue ball.

As far as kicking goes, and the use of spin...my feelings are that it's all situationally dependant. Learning how much spin, and speed to hit the ball to get the desired effect will come with experience. Good luck!

BTW, that safety game, trying to get your opponent on 3 fouls is a great game for improving your safety play. But don't just do this against someone at your skill level only. Doing this against a much stronger opponent will give you the chance to see what he's doing to put you in lock-down, as well as showing you what the weaknesses in your kicking and safety game are, as stronger players will usually try to exploit them.

Dags

Deeman3
06-21-2007, 07:24 AM
Many very good points Dags, as usual. I remember that Byrne used to refer to seven levels of safe. While I never broke them down into the exact descriptions he used, I do think of them on several levels and I think Efren and a couple of others redefiined our view on safety play. I remember being a pretty good player and still not thinking of playing a kick to a certain side. Now, thirty years later, most of us hit for a very specific side or ball portion to send the kicked ball to an exact spot. Many years ago we were just thrilled to hit the friggin' ball if we could not see it and this was not just the ametuer players....

DickLeonard
06-21-2007, 08:02 AM
bradb my all time favorite safety story is. An Albany NY safety giant before his game with the Great Ralph Greenleaf inquired if it would be alright if he played him his tight safety play. Ralph told him play your game. They lagged for for the break and Ralph's ball just reached the sidepocket. The Albany player had Ralph break, he gave him a rotation break,the safety Giant ran 7 balls and missed, Ralph ran 125 and out.

The moral of the story a Great Offense beats a Great defence.####

Cydpkt
06-21-2007, 09:36 AM
I bet those people who have a great offense also have a great defense to back it up. There are times when you hit the throttle and times when you slow things down a bit. The game you are playing and the table layout will determine which offense or defense you bring to the table. I think that Efren is a great example of a good mix.

canadan
06-21-2007, 10:50 AM
I like to look for a 2 way shot before a safety. unless I know its a tough run out for them. the bad thing about safetys is when you miss them and leave a open table. most top player find a way out. if your playn some one way above your skill. more then likely they will win the safety battle. I won a couple safety battles against top locals,( it was a non jump cue tourny and they were great jumpers so knowing that left them kicks all night ended up beating some of the top player around here. But insted of saying good game they cryed and complaind so much about my handi I had to split insted of taking first. It was sad the lack of sportsman ship and these guys alway having to prove they are the best. but that a dif story all together) but my bag of tricks is not a big sack of triks like some real good player out there. Just another thing to work on on the practice table. And knowing if you opp. is a good jumper or kicker helps too. If they are week at one try to leave them that shot. nothing like leaving a hard kick shot and he runs away to his case and pulls out a jumper. or viceversa and makes a nice 3 rail kick to a safe (ouch)

Jager85
06-21-2007, 11:01 AM
I realized recently that I am too aggressive when I play 8-ball and have been working on my defensive play. 1st of all this is really hard for me because I have little patience to be playing safe when there is a break-out ball lined up. It is just risky to break out some balls. Secondly I was playing very conservative at league last night. I shoot APA League and am a SL6. I played another SL6. Within the 1st 2 games I played 6 safeties. He kicked in 4 of the 6 shots, and 3 were entirely slop. after losing the 1st 2 games to his sloppy kicks, I lost alot of patience and played like normal. Ended up losing on hill-hill in a very well played match.

I also do not like playing defense sometimes because I do not like to let him in control of the table. And also for that chance of hitting the ball 1" too far and leaving an open table. I am still working on my defense, but do not prefer it.

Curtis

KellyStick
06-21-2007, 11:40 AM
I have what I call the perfect shot theory. Maybe I stole it I dunno. But if you look for the perfect shot everytime you will find them all over the place. The perfect shot is one you can make, one that gives you position on your next shot, and one that leaves your opponent with nothing if you miss. I beleive that always looking for these shots will improve your overall play, awareness of the table, strategy and so on. IT's what I see many players missing. They know how to shoot but they don't read the table well and they don't think ahead and when they miss they often just give the game away. I guess that is what is called a Banger?

Deeman3
06-21-2007, 12:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> I have what I call the perfect shot theory. Maybe I stole it I dunno. But if you look for the perfect shot everytime you will find them all over the place. The perfect shot is one you can make, one that gives you position on your next shot, and one that leaves your opponent with nothing if you miss. I beleive that always looking for these shots will improve your overall play, awareness of the table, strategy and so on. IT's what I see many players missing. They know how to shoot but they don't read the table well and they don't think ahead and when they miss they often just give the game away. I guess that is what is called a Banger? <hr /></blockquote> <font color="blue"> Maybe they are just putting the chalk upside down on the table. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif </font color>

Cydpkt
06-21-2007, 01:05 PM
Offense or defense a person needs to decide what they are going to do before they get set for the shot. Give it 100% on what ever you decide to do. If you play safe and a person makes a great shot then give them their due. I would rather someone make a great shot to beat me than it being a mistake I made that cost me the game/match. One of the biggest mistakes people make when trying to break out a ball is to blast them open. This moves several balls around and can cause a "problem" ball somewhere else. Try breaking the ball out by nudging the balls. It is important to have a "safety valve" for the follow up shot after the nudge to get back in line and continue the run.

canadan
06-21-2007, 01:22 PM
a good safety should give you more then just a place to hide. also look for ways to play safe and breakout a cluster or set up a break out ball or even try to get other balls custered. the whole reason to play safe is cuz you have a prob.so try to fix any probs when playn safe. Some time at the start of a rack I'll look how to get good possition on a safety that will able me to free up some balls. Not just thinking what ball will go in what pocket

MrLucky
06-22-2007, 06:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote canadan:</font><hr> a good safety should give you more then just a place to hide. also look for ways to play safe and breakout a cluster or set up a break out ball or even try to get other balls custered. the whole reason to play safe is cuz you have a prob.so try to fix any probs when playn safe. Some time at the start of a rack I'll look how to get good possition on a safety that will able me to free up some balls. Not just thinking what ball will go in what pocket <hr /></blockquote> <font color="green"> this is what I was taught also and it will win way more games or close matches than lose them! </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

jjinfla
06-22-2007, 06:48 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman3:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote KellyStick:</font><hr> I have what I call the perfect shot theory. Maybe I stole it I dunno. But if you look for the perfect shot everytime you will find them all over the place. The perfect shot is one you can make, one that gives you position on your next shot, and one that leaves your opponent with nothing if you miss. I beleive that always looking for these shots will improve your overall play, awareness of the table, strategy and so on. IT's what I see many players missing. They know how to shoot but they don't read the table well and they don't think ahead and when they miss they often just give the game away. I guess that is what is called a Banger? <hr /></blockquote> <font color="blue"> Maybe they are just putting the chalk upside down on the table. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

Also known as a "two way shot"

Jake

DickLeonard
06-22-2007, 07:18 AM
Deeman not only the chalk upside down but baby powdering the complete table. Joe Canton kept coming back to the table with his cigarette floating in water. He thought his opponent was screwing with his head so he proceeded to litter the pool table in baby powder. Andrew Ponzi was screaming he turned the table into a snow storm.####

Rod
06-22-2007, 06:29 PM
Play some one pocket. Lots of safety play is standard fare. If your weak in that area you'll get creamed.

Rod

Koenig
06-23-2007, 06:20 PM
Look for ways to mess up for your opponent, solve your problems playing 8-ball. Also try thinking 2-3 steps ahead.

If I put him here he will do this, but hey then I can do this. If I put him here heŽll just hook me here. Often that kind of thinking changes some of your decisions.

I think thats almost as important as good kicking skills, and what separated Efren, Parica from the rest of us back when.

Remember a match between Bata and Babica in WPC. Efren pointed and looked at the sixball. Refused hooking Babica, played a beginners safe, (I thought he was on something) got hooked, kicked Babica behind the sixball and won the game.

Of course nine out of ten getting your opponent hooked and kicking the OB on the correct side with speed control is he *hit. The chess is just another dimension.

Playing 8-ball most players choose balls that are easiest to run out, even when they know it will be a safety- rack. Choose the best safety-balls then.

But like someone said, messing with your opponents balls may be better sometimes than kicking out. If heŽs left with 3 clusters ball in hand wonŽt automatically win the game.

9-ball is a different story.

Snapshot9
06-25-2007, 06:50 AM
A good Education lies within your brain, you just have to ask it the right questions........ Scott 'Snapshot' Fraser

Deeman3
06-25-2007, 07:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Deeman not only the chalk upside down but baby powdering the complete table. Joe Canton kept coming back to the table with his cigarette floating in water. He thought his opponent was screwing with his head so he proceeded to litter the pool table in baby powder. Andrew Ponzi was screaming he turned the table into a snow storm.#### <hr /></blockquote> <font color="blue">

Dick,

I swear that some of the tables I play on were just used to change a baby diaper before play started! Did any of these great players ever come to blows over stuff like this? I know Mosconi had a temper but how about the others? </font color>

bradb
06-27-2007, 04:05 PM
I've been away awhile and enjoyed coming back to read all the different views on safety play.

A good reply was: if the other guy is above your level then his safety play will be above you also.- However if you can lay down a good safety "first" then you have him on the defense first and it helps your confidence. A good player can run the table just like a pro given a chance, but you have to have that chance.

In the long run the better player will prevail of course, but if I had known how to lay down a good hook, I know I would have done much better.

One player said he does'nt have the patience for safety play, I guess its a gut thing, if you are confident in the shot, go for it, but if you know that you are usually 50% or less on the shot, its a crap shoot. A good safety is also an aggressive play and keeps your opponent hopefully sitting down.

One of my team mates is a pretty good jump shot player, I'm learning to shut him down with frozen ball play or touching rail ball, working on that. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Snapshot9
06-29-2007, 11:15 AM
There is a difference between playing the game well, which will win you many matches, and being able to win even when you are playing a better player.

Knowing how to win is worth it's weight in gold. Safety play is a MAIN factor in beating someone better than you are. No one's kicking ability or jumping ability is as good as them shooting a normal shot? Is it. It reduces the chances of them coming out like a rose usually quite considerable, where gives you more of an opportunity to win the game. Without going into a long diatribe of strategy, and mathematical probablities, and war-like moves, I will just tell you to read The Art of War by Sun Tzu. I wish I had read it much earlier in life.

bradb
07-03-2007, 02:59 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Snapshot9:</font><hr> There is a difference between playing the game well, which will win you many matches, and being able to win even when you are playing a better player.

Knowing how to win is worth it's weight in gold. Safety play is a MAIN factor in beating someone better than you are. No one's kicking ability or jumping ability is as good as them shooting a normal shot? Is it. It reduces the chances of them coming out like a rose usually quite considerable, where gives you more of an opportunity to win the game. Without going into a long diatribe of strategy, and mathematical probablities, and war-like moves, I will just tell you to read The Art of War by Sun Tzu. I wish I had read it much earlier in life. <hr /></blockquote>

Read that, interesting read but a long way from pool, however there is an analogy.
In snooker I've played century run players, while I've only been up there once in my whole life. If I ever won a game off them it was a concentrated effort of safety play, and careful shot planning.

The biggest factor is confidence... All the safety play in the world won't win the game it will only give you a chance. After you force the better player to make a mistake you then have to have to step out and start potting knowing that if you miss, its over. If you can play your own game without thinking of that, then you can win.

underdog
07-03-2007, 11:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bradb:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Snapshot9:</font><hr> There is a difference between playing the game well, which will win you many matches, and being able to win even when you are playing a better player.

Knowing how to win is worth it's weight in gold. Safety play is a MAIN factor in beating someone better than you are. No one's kicking ability or jumping ability is as good as them shooting a normal shot? Is it. It reduces the chances of them coming out like a rose usually quite considerable, where gives you more of an opportunity to win the game. Without going into a long diatribe of strategy, and mathematical probablities, and war-like moves, I will just tell you to read The Art of War by Sun Tzu. I wish I had read it much earlier in life. <hr /></blockquote>

Read that, interesting read but a long way from pool, however there is an analogy.
In snooker I've played century run players, while I've only been up there once in my whole life. If I ever won a game off them it was a concentrated effort of safety play, and careful shot planning.

The biggest factor is confidence... All the safety play in the world won't win the game it will only give you a chance. After you force the better player to make a mistake you then have to have to step out and start potting knowing that if you miss, its over. If you can play your own game without thinking of that, then you can win. <hr /></blockquote>



It's like they say...play the table, not your opponent.

Jager85
07-05-2007, 12:07 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote underdog:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote bradb:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Snapshot9:</font><hr> There is a difference between playing the game well, which will win you many matches, and being able to win even when you are playing a better player.

Knowing how to win is worth it's weight in gold. Safety play is a MAIN factor in beating someone better than you are. No one's kicking ability or jumping ability is as good as them shooting a normal shot? Is it. It reduces the chances of them coming out like a rose usually quite considerable, where gives you more of an opportunity to win the game. Without going into a long diatribe of strategy, and mathematical probablities, and war-like moves, I will just tell you to read The Art of War by Sun Tzu. I wish I had read it much earlier in life. <hr /></blockquote>

Read that, interesting read but a long way from pool, however there is an analogy.
In snooker I've played century run players, while I've only been up there once in my whole life. If I ever won a game off them it was a concentrated effort of safety play, and careful shot planning.

The biggest factor is confidence... All the safety play in the world won't win the game it will only give you a chance. After you force the better player to make a mistake you then have to have to step out and start potting knowing that if you miss, its over. If you can play your own game without thinking of that, then you can win. <hr /></blockquote>



It's like they say...play the table, not your opponent. <hr /></blockquote>

I don't do either of these, but I am pretty close to playing my opponent. I play against myself. I know in my head I am a really good shot, but I always care too much abaout what everyone thinks of me. Therefore, I put pressure on myself to play great and will sometimes take stupid, but fancy, shots that are missed 75% of the time. Even practicing alone I put so much pressure on myself to run out every rack I don't focus enough on the shot I am on and end up hanging an easy shot due to poor comensation or stroke.

It is when I have not shot in over a week or 2 and am so psyched to play again all I think about is how much fun it is and next thing you know the match is over with 6 games played and 7-8 innings.

Curtis

bradb
07-05-2007, 01:24 PM
<hr /></blockquote>

I don't do either of these, but I am pretty close to playing my opponent. I play against myself. I know in my head I am a really good shot, but I always care too much abaout what everyone thinks of me. Therefore, I put pressure on myself to play great and will sometimes take stupid, but fancy, shots that are missed 75% of the time. Even practicing alone I put so much pressure on myself to run out every rack I don't focus enough on the shot I am on and end up hanging an easy shot due to poor comensation or stroke.

It is when I have not shot in over a week or 2 and am so psyched to play again all I think about is how much fun it is and next thing you know the match is over with 6 games played and 7-8 innings.

Curtis <hr /></blockquote>

I have my own table so I get a lot of practice in. I would say that i play at least 30% better in practice than in actual matches. The biggest problem is someone is watching so i tense up thinking I gotta do good. So its imperitive to wipe your mind clear of outside influence, thats so hard to do, but I have found ways.
One is to talk to myself in my mind. If I'm listening to me then I can't hear or think about anyone else. When you do this you will feel the tenseness leave your arm and you feel yourself relax.

Notice that many really good players seem to be in a trance. We've all seen someone on a nice run get interupted by conversation then they miss their next shot. So being in that zone is so important

For that reason a lot of players say practise is no good, but its the only way you can improve your skills, then you can go to the table with confidence.

I believe that you have to do the drills to lock in certain shots. My weakness is drawback at distance... boring as hell to practise but I think its the only way. I know one very good player who shoots kick shots for hours to nail it in his mind.

Of course like all players there are those times when you just can't get it going, you miss shots that you normally take for granted. This just adds to the dominoe effect that leads you to total melt down in play. I've tried my damnedest to not get down on myself in these times because you can snap out of it in one game if you keep you composure.

I hear you on that sudden urge to slam at a shot in the middle of a run!
This happens to me when I'm faced with a difficult position shot... the temptation is to get it over with quickly!
Lately I've began to solve this by instantly backing away when that feeling comes! Walk around the table, collect your thoughts don't go back until you calm down that inner demon.

okinawa77
07-13-2007, 06:20 PM
"My weakness is drawback at distance"

I tend to do well with this type of shot, and I almost always get positive comments. In one case, while at Slick Willies Pool Hall in Austin, Texas (1 of 3: Burnet Rd)...I was playing a high skill level player, and I had a situation whereas my object ball was near the pocket near the long rail (foot) with the cue ball on the other end of the same long rail (head). I have over 85% of the table's length between the cue ball and object ball, and I needed to draw straight back for position on the money ball because it was frozen on the head rail. He told me, "Cowboy Up!". I smirked because I know I can shoot this shot. The problem was...I over drew the cue ball. By the way, this was a 9 foot table. I still won the match, but at the time I didn't understand why people would always be so impressed by that shot. It's just a draw shot.
It wasn't until recently that I realized what makes this type of shot so difficult and so wow'ing. In order to perform this shot successfully, the stroke must have a straight follow through, and this is very difficult with many players. The main reason is mechanics. You have to have spot on mechanics.
For practice, I would put an object ball in front of a corner pocket and the cue ball about a diamond out from the opposite corner. There are 2 different strokes for pulling this shot off successfully. One, which is my preference, is to shoot using a long, smooth follow through stroke. The second is to shoot using a snap-back draw stroke, but it requires tremendous control...and if you don't do it just right...you'll look like a dork. Because using a snap-back for table length draw will almost always cause the cue ball to jump a little off the playing surface. But if you can time the landing just right, you can actually draw the cue ball back like you have never seen before. For me this is just a fun shot to do, but in a logical sense...it is frequently an unnecessary shot. It is a rare instance when you will have a situation where this type of shot is necessary.
One other favorite draw shot of mine, for object balls near the rail....is to shoot rail first using a follow through stroke.

Snapshot9
07-15-2007, 09:24 AM
You have to practice safeties just the same as you practice making shots. One easy way is to start with 9 ball with balls spread out, and figure out how to play safe on every open shot you have. Even if you do get safe, try to resafe yourself back. Analyze what happened right and wrong with each safety. Shoot some over again if you want to get it right.

Sometimes I think one of the best safeties is the half-ball hook because an opponent is limited what can be done with the object ball and the cue ball, and will most likely leave you an open look afterwards.

Another thing, opponent specific, know what type of shots are low percentage or error prone type shots for them, so even if you can not hook them, you can leave them a shot that they, in all most likelyhood, will not make.

Another strategy is a little more chess-like, is to leave them a shot where they can not get good shape and will be out of alignment, could be the next ball, the 2nd, or even the 3rd one in the run-out. This increases there chance of error which increases your chance to win. Again, this depends on how well you judge your opponent's ability.

This is recognizing and capitalizing on their 'weaknesses' to win the game. I see all kinds of players that play an open table good, but get flustered when a 'problem' pops up, or that can not kick, or maybe can kick 1 rail, but not more than 1 rail, some can not jump a ball, or when they do they only hit the ball maybe 1 out of 10 attempts, and never make the ball. And I have only seen maybe 2 players that can use the 'dart' style jumping method that would be what I call effective, all the rest NEVER make a ball that is out in the open table. They can only make the ones sitting in the pocket. It is important to notice these things.

Sid_Vicious
07-15-2007, 03:57 PM
"And I have only seen maybe 2 players that can use the 'dart' style jumping method that would be what I call effective, all the rest NEVER make a ball that is out in the open table. They can only make the ones sitting in the pocket."

I know several, and a couple learned from me, no brag, just fact. When I am in form, gamblers I head-up with want to adjust a spot so I'm not allowed to jump, and I always use the dart. If practiced intensely, the dart is more deadly than the conventional stroke, JMHO but I'm sticking to it. sid~~~way out of stroke today but the darty talent is still there, practice, practice, practice

bradb
07-15-2007, 05:01 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote okinawa77:</font><hr> "My weakness is drawback at distance"

I tend to do well with this type of shot, and I almost always get positive comments. In one case, while at Slick Willies Pool Hall in Austin, Texas (1 of 3: Burnet Rd)...I was playing a high skill level player, and I had a situation whereas my object ball was near the pocket near the long rail (foot) with the cue ball on the other end of the same long rail (head). I have over 85% of the table's length between the cue ball and object ball, and I needed to draw straight back for position on the money ball because it was frozen on the head rail. He told me, "Cowboy Up!". I smirked because I know I can shoot this shot. The problem was...I over drew the cue ball. By the way, this was a 9 foot table. I still won the match, but at the time I didn't understand why people would always be so impressed by that shot. It's just a draw shot.
It wasn't until recently that I realized what makes this type of shot so difficult and so wow'ing. In order to perform this shot successfully, the stroke must have a straight follow through, and this is very difficult with many players. The main reason is mechanics. You have to have spot on mechanics.
For practice, I would put an object ball in front of a corner pocket and the cue ball about a diamond out from the opposite corner. There are 2 different strokes for pulling this shot off successfully. One, which is my preference, is to shoot using a long, smooth follow through stroke. The second is to shoot using a snap-back draw stroke, but it requires tremendous control...and if you don't do it just right...you'll look like a dork. Because using a snap-back for table length draw will almost always cause the cue ball to jump a little off the playing surface. But if you can time the landing just right, you can actually draw the cue ball back like you have never seen before. For me this is just a fun shot to do, but in a logical sense...it is frequently an unnecessary shot. It is a rare instance when you will have a situation where this type of shot is necessary.
One other favorite draw shot of mine, for object balls near the rail....is to shoot rail first using a follow through stroke. <hr /></blockquote>

I can draw back fairly well from 1/2 table length up to close, but that long drawback still eludes me. I tend to hold my cue a little tight in my hand, I notice some players good at drawback hold the cue loose. Maybe thats part of it.

I usually make the OB on the long drawback attempt but the QB may only come back slightly, so that tells me I'm stroking straight just not getting low enough on initial contact. Anytime I try and get lower at distance its a miscue.

Theres another way and thats to hold the cue parallel to the table and hit the QB low, I have manged to pull the ball back this way but its not my usual stroke and requires a lot of follow through and sets up a miss.

1Time
07-17-2007, 03:43 AM
Lots of real good info and experience shown in this thread.

Most players aren't very good at all and routinely run 3 or fewer balls. What's worse they play as if defense is not even a part of the sport. I like to begin discussions of safety play with the offense/defense aspects of a more familiar sport like football and state it is the same for pool. It seems to make it easier for folks to accept their previous blindness to the defensive aspect of pool.